Diversity & Inclusion

Recruiting and retaining a work force that is diverse in gender, race and other markers of difference provides businesses and organizations with innovative ideas and a competitive edge. Diversity provides a significant advantage in competing for clients, customers and suppliers in today’s global marketplace. NCRW is supporting diversity efforts by recommending best practices for recruiting, retaining and advancing the careers of women, particularly women of color. This research extends to examining the benefits of diversity in leadership and how women’s participation improves decision-making. NCRW is helping companies to assess their workplace environments and identify barriers to inclusion: from practices, to policies, to the informal culture of organizations. NCRW’s Corporate Circle supports companies in their efforts to strengthen and advance policies that boost diversity and inclusion.

It's a Man's (Celluloid) World: On-screen Representations of Female Characters in the Top 100 Films of 2011 (Executive Summary)

 In 2011, females remained dramatically under-represented as characters in film when compared with their representation in the U.S. population. Last year, females accounted for 33% of all characters in the top 100 domestic grossing films. This represents an increase of 5 percentage points since 2002 when females comprised 28% of characters. While the percentage of female characters has increased over the last decade, the percentage of female protagonists has declined. In 2002, female characters accounted for 16% of protagonists. In 2011, females comprised only 11% of protagonists.

URL: 
http://womenintvfilm.sdsu.edu/files/2011_Its_a_Mans_World_Exec_Summ.pdf

Is Board Diversity Important for Firm Performance and Board Independence?: An exploratory study of Singapore Listed Company

Following the 1997 Asian financial crisis and the spate of corporate frauds and accounting scandals such as Enron, WorldCom, Parmalat, Satyam and China Aviation Oil (Singapore), there has been considerable research about the effectiveness of the board of directors in the corporate governance of firms. There are strong conceptual and business propositions for greater board diversity. In the corporate world, there has been anecdotal evidence from some large corporations such as IBM, Ford Motor, Nortel, Lucent, Sara Lee, Texaco, and DuPont that diversity at every level of the work force tothe board of directors of firms have been cited as an imperative for business success.

URL: 
http://www.mas.gov.sg/resource/publications/staff_papers/Staff%20Paper%20No.52.pdf

Marriage Structure and Resistance to the Gender Revolution in the Workplace

 In this article, we examine a heretofore neglected pocket of resistance to the gender revolution in the workplace: married male employees who have stay-at-home wives. We develop and empirically test the theoretical argument suggesting that such organizational members, compared to male employees in modern marriages, are more likely to exhibit attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors that are harmful to women in the workplace. To assess this hypothesis, we conducted four studies with a total of 718 married, male participants. We found that employed husbands in traditional marriages, compared to those in modern marriages, tend to (a) view the presence of women in the workplace unfavorably, (b) perceive that organizations with higher numbers of female employees are operating less smoothly, (c) find organizations with female leaders as relatively unattractive, and (d) deny, more frequently, qualified female employees opportunities for promotion.

URL: 
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2018259
Syndicate content