Diversity & Inclusion

Recruiting and retaining a work force that is diverse in gender, race and other markers of difference provides businesses and organizations with innovative ideas and a competitive edge. Diversity provides a significant advantage in competing for clients, customers and suppliers in today’s global marketplace. NCRW is supporting diversity efforts by recommending best practices for recruiting, retaining and advancing the careers of women, particularly women of color. This research extends to examining the benefits of diversity in leadership and how women’s participation improves decision-making. NCRW is helping companies to assess their workplace environments and identify barriers to inclusion: from practices, to policies, to the informal culture of organizations. NCRW’s Corporate Circle supports companies in their efforts to strengthen and advance policies that boost diversity and inclusion.

Consortium on Race, Gender, and Ethnicity

The Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity (CRGE) at the University of Maryland is an interdisciplinary research center which promotes intersectional scholarship through original research, mentoring, and collaboration. CRGE's work explores the intersections of race, gender, ethnicity and other dimensions of inequality as they shape the construction and representation of identities, behavior and complex social relations.

Contact

1208 Cole Field House
College Park, MD 20742
Ph. (301) 405-2931
Fx. (301) 405-2868
http://www.crge.umd.edu
btdill@umd.edu
rzambran@umd.edu

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Principal Staff

Ruth E. Zambrana, Ph.D., Director
E-mail: rzambran@umd.edu

Laura A. Logie, Ph.D., Assistant Director
E-mail: lauraalogie@hotmail.com

Bonnie Thornton Dill, Ph.D., Founding Director, CRGE
E-mail: btdill@umd.edu

Wendy Hall, Program Management Specialist
E-mail: hallw@umd.edu

Beth Douthirt-Cohen, Communications Coordinator
E-mail: bdc1@umd.edu
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

Developing Research Studies include:

 
Limited research has been conducted on CVD risk factors and effective interventions among Latinos of Central and South American origin (CSA). Specific aims of this study are to: (1) assess health behaviors, social and psychosocial CVD risk factors among adult Central/South American men and women; (2) examine the associations between psychosocial, social and health behavior cardiovascular risk factors with clinical measurements among adult CSA men and women; and (3) conduct a pilot study with lay health promoters to test the effectiveness of literacy and linguistic appropriate health education using the Model for Improvement to improve CVD risk profiles among CSA adults. A cross-sectional health interview and examination survey of 400 CSA 30-64 year old adults residing in Montgomery County MD will be conducted, followed by an intervention with 30 lay community health promoters. The intervention includes 14 contact points; pre- and post-test instruments will measure effectiveness of the intervention.

Does Stress “Get Under the Skin” Differently By Social Status? Identifying Essential Bio-Social Pathways for Cardiovascular Disease Morbidity
 
 
Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) is the major cause of death in the United States and racial/ethnic minorities have high incidence and prevalence rates compared to other groups in the population. According to the American Heart Association (2009), most recent prevalence rates for CVD were highest for blacks (45%) compared to Whites (33%) and Hispanics make up the largest ethnic group with increasing rates (32%) relative to their representation in the population. Although studies have documented population differences in CVD, the underlying biological and social risk factors that work concomitantly to account for these differences are not well researched or understood. Using secondary data from the 2006 health and Retirement Study Core Data File and Biomarker Supplement, we will examine the association between social status, SES, psycho-social adversities, biomarkers of disease, health status and health behaviors to assess their relationship(s) to CVD morbidity. Our main analytic interest in examining these relationships is to identify essential bio-social pathways of disease vulnerability, the mechanisms that mediate or moderate those relationships and the risk factors that place marginalized minorities (Blacks and Hispanics) at a disadvantage for CVD morbidity at older (50+yrs) rather than younger ages (<25yrs). This project is innovative since it is one of the very few studies to examine how social risk factors “get under the skin” differently for status groups in efforts to identify the important distal mechanisms involved that disproportionately increase VCD risk f or Blacks and Hispanics. Implications and outcomes of the study are aimed to help clinicians and health policy makers reduce disparities and increase cardiovascular risk prevention strategies to improve population health.

Stress for Success: The Impact of Occupational Stressors on the African American & Latino Professoriate
 
Occupational stress manifests itself in stress-related disorders (physical, mental), poor work performance, reduced productivity and retention of qualified employees in the workforce. This project investigates the relationships between occupational stressors, organizational factors, and moderators to explain variation in the physical and mental health of under-represented minority (URM) men and women faculty. Mixed methods are proposed to test the central hypothesis- URM women faculty will report a higher reported number of physical and mental health conditions than URM men. Data is collected from four sources; 1) survey, 2) focus groups, 3) in-depth interviews, and, 4) review of Curriculum Vitae. The sample will consist of 300 (150 males & 150 females) URM tenure track assistant or tenured associate professors in Research I and II institutions. These data will serve as the baseline for a larger longitudinal study to assess career path and progression over a three year follow-up time period.

Childhood Origins of Health Disparities in Young Adulthood
 
 
The primary objective in the proposed application is to determine the independent and interacting influences of gender, race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status (SES) at the family and community level on overweight and health among adolescents and young adults. Our central hypothesis is that social/cultural factors (e.g. preferences and norms) and structural factors (e.g. differential access to resources) interact to explain the disparities in weight status observed across racial/ethnic groups. Our collective experience in research on Hispanic, African American, Asian, and majority health, childhood obesity, the analysis of health outcomes, and our experience with management and analysis of large datasets make us uniquely qualified to conduct this research project.

Differences in Risk Factors by Hypertension Status Among Postmenopausal African American and Latino Women
 
The goal of this study is to investigate how various risk factors, socioeconomic status (SES), psychosocial, and access related factors, mediated by health behaviors and medical history, can increase our understanding of race/ethnic and gender differences in hypertension status (normotensive vs. hypertensive; treated vs. untreated; controlled vs. uncontrolled) and transitions in hypertension status for African American and Latino women ages 50 to79 years. Using secondary data analyses of the Women's' Health Initiative (WHI) for the African American (n=14,618) and Latino (n=6484) subsamples of the Observational Study (OS), Clinical Trials and Extended Study (2005-2010), we will address the risk factors that place racial/ethnic women at risk for critical levels of hypertension. Our main analytic interest in comparing hypertension status at baseline and transitions of hypertension status in subsequent years is to capture how risk factors can accumulate and exacerbate health conditions over time. Specifically, this study 1) examines the association between SES, psychosocial, and access factors with hypertension status (normotensive vs. hypertensive) and transitions in status and tests whether the associations are mediated by medical history and health behaviors among African American and Latino women, 2) assesses the underlying factors contributing to differences in two indicators of hypertension status a) treated vs. untreated hypertensives and b) controlled vs. uncontrolled hypertension status and transitions in status among African American and Latino women that have been identified as having hypertension, and 3) examines the relationship between access to care and geographic availability for health care services and hypertension status (normotensive vs. hypertensive and treated vs. untreated) and transitions in status for African American and Latino women. Of significance, assessing hypertension endpoints over time periods will allow a longitudinal assessment of the effects of SES on hypertension status. More importantly, the patterns of outcomes of the study will illuminate our understanding of the underlying factors that contribute to disparities in hypertension status for racial/ethnic women. This project is innovative since it is one of the very few studies to examine incidence and prevalence of hypertension status by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status using longitudinal data in efforts to help clinicians and health policy makers reduce disparities and increase cardiovascular risk prevention strategies to improve population health.

Past Research Program Areas:

Intersections, Identities, and Inequalities (Dr. Bonnie Thornton Dill, director)

This program area focuses on the development of theoretical, methodological and pedagogical approaches to the study of intersections of race, gender, class, ethnicity and other dimensions of inequality. It is an interdisciplinary research program area that seeks to elaborate how dimensions of inequality intersect, creating new and distinct social formations. This includes promoting research that contextualizes the lives and experiences of individuals and groups, as well as develops applications of knowledge to human problems. This scholarship embraces a wide range of approaches that permit complex and nuanced explorations. Intersectional analysis is also an effort to move beyond binary or oppositional analyses and toward an understanding of the ways the ideological, political, and economic systems of power construct and reconstruct one another. An intersectional approach, grounded in lived experience, provides the intellectual foundation for the pursuit of social justice.

Health and Social Well Being of Low Income Women, Children, and Families (Dr. Ruth E. Zambrana, director)

This program area seeks to build a more comprehensive and ethnic-specific scientific knowledge base on the effects of the intersection of poverty, institutional barriers, and other non-medical factors that contribute to adverse health status. This approach takes into account the influence of race, gender, and ethnicity to promote responsiveness in the development of future health interventions.

Material Culture/Visual Culture (Drs. Mary Corbin Sies and Angel David Nieves, co-directors)

The Material Culture/Visual Culture (MC/VC) program area is engaged in research on African American material and visual culture, and more generally on the material and visual culture of marginalized subgroups of North America. The group seeks to publicize the value of material and visual evidence for understanding the cultures of everyday life of American subcultures and to foster an environment in which scholars from different backgrounds can explore and refine research and theories for working with material and visual culture.

Schooling, Ethnic Communities and International Perspectives. (Dr. Lory J. Dance, director).

This Research Program Area is in the early stages of development. Led by sociologist Dr. Lory J. Dance, this area focuses on the uses of qualitative methodologies in the study of education in ethnic communities in the United States and internationally. The group also houses the Qualitative Research Interest Group (QRIG; co-directed by Drs. Lory J. Dance and Annette Lareau), which sponsored a colloquium series in fall 2005 on funding qualitative research projects.

Other Activities:

Intersectional Research Database. CRGE is home to the world's first online database devoted exclusively to intersectional research. The Intersectional Research Database (IRD), which was launched in summer 2005, currently features over 100 annotations of articles and books on intersectional issues. The IRD is updated weekly and will soon include audio, visual images, video and sound.

CRGE Graduate Colloquium. CRGE holds a monthly colloquium for graduate students that focuses on various topics related to intersectionality and social justice. Graduate students from across the disciplines participate through attendance and by sharing their own work at the end of each semester. Recent colloquium topics have dealt with the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina; interdisciplinary job talks; intersections and sexualities; and the commodification of Black youth, which was led by Dr. Patricia Hill Collins.

Research Interest Groups (RIGS). RIGS are smaller research groups, each sponsored by a Research Program Area. RIGS are collaborative, interdisciplinary groups that conduct intersectional research. The RIGS aim to create groups that can assist their members in preparing and submitting proposals for federal, state, and private sector research grants in CRGE Research Program Areas.


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Reports & Resources

 Click here for all publications.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

CRISP Scholars

CRGE Interdisciplinary Scholars Program (CRISP) provides scholars with an opportunity to learn firsthand the processes of research, publication, and administration through a mentoring relationship with CRGE faculty. The focus of this exceptional program is two-fold: rigorous training and dedicated mentoring. CrISP scholars are first- and second-year incoming graduate students from departments affiliated with CRGE.


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Center for the Education of Women

The University of Michigan Center for the Education of Women (CEW) advances the personal, educational, career, professional and leadership potential of women. The services, programs, applied research, and action initiatives conducted by CEW promote inclusiveness and equity within the University, across the state and throughout the nation.

Founded in 1964, the Center for the Education of Women, within the University of Michigan, was one of the nation's first comprehensive, university-based centers focused on women.  Designed to serve the needs of women students as well as women returning to school or work, CEW (then known as the Center for the Continuing Education of Women) was founded with a three part mission of service, advocacy, and research. CEW maintains that mission today, serving University students, staff and faculty, community members, women and men, facing educational, employment or other life issues.

Contact

330 E. Liberty St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104-2274
Ph. (734) 764-6005
Fx. (734) 998-6203
http://www.cew.umich.edu
cew.mail@umich.edu
contactcew@umich.edu

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Principal Staff

Gloria Thomas, Executive Director
Ph. (734) 764-7640
E-mail: gthomas@umich.edu

Wanlanda Ault, Fianance Assistant

Kristina Bee, Development and Scholarship Assistant

Jacqueline Bowman, Senior Counselor and Program Specialist

Eilisha Dermont, Communications Manager
Ph. (734) 764-6277
E-mail: edermont@umich.edu

Kirsten Elling, Associate Director for Counseling, Programs and Services

Connie Hansen, Assistant to the Director
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

RESEARCH

Center researchers are currently analyzing the results of the Faculty Work-Life Study, a joint project of the Center for the Education of Women and the UM Center for Research on Learning and Teaching. The survey of UM faculty included questions about climate, workload, sources of satisfaction and stress, and incorporate AAUDI questions for comparison to similar institutions.  This project also provides comparison to the 1998 FWLS.

Contingent Faculty in a Tenure Track World - CEW researchers held focus groups with full- and part-time non-tenure track (NTT) faculty at twelve research universities across the country. In total, we conducted 24 ninety-minute focus groups with a total of 343 full- and part-time NTT faculty. A report of the project is available  and a video based on the project explores the responses of focus group members. The project was funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

The National Clearinghouse on Academic Worklife  (www.academicworklife.org) combines into a single website information resources and community discussions to support those who study or participate in academic work.  Up to date articles and policy examples are available on topics ranging from family-friendly benefits, tenure attainment, and faculty satisfaction to policy development, productivity, and demographics.  An email newsletter is also available free to subscribers. This clearinghouse was developed  through a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

The Dual Career Ladder Project, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, resulted in several publications based on the findings of our institutional survey of U.S. institutions of higher education.  highlighting the numbers, working conditions and perceived contributions of non tenure track faculty.  These are available on the CEW website.

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

CEW’s Advanced Leadership Program offers middle management University of Michigan staff, recommended by their supervisors, an eight-month skill development workshop series and accompanying change management project.  This program has been offered annually for nearly 10 years. 

 

Focus on Leadership, addresses the need for leadership development and training for staff not yet in key middle-management positions or not yet ready for the more extensive Advanced Leadership Program.  Offered to approximately 30 individuals annually, this program offers participants an introduction to leadership concepts while it assists participants in developing an identity as a potential leader.

 

Emerging Leaders Iniative  CEW is currently developing an innovative nine-month program for emerging leaders (those with less than 6 years in their career fields) over the course of two years. The program will focus on women from a specific Michigan urban region, combining those from the private and the non-profit sectors.  The program combines in-person sessions, career coaching by senior leaders, and ongoing support and learning using web 2.0 tools including social media and online learning. 

PROGRAMS

CEW offers about 50 programs each term, covering topics such as careers, career change and job searching, work-life balance, leadership development, and focused programs for graduate students and post-docs.  In addition, CEW brings special events and speakers to the campus and community. 

In addition, CEW leads three support networks for University of Michigan women: Women of Color in the Academy Project and Junior Women Faculty Network for women faculty and the Women of Color Task Force for women staff.  These networks offer support, mentoring, and learning opportunities for participants.  The Task Force delivers a campus-wide career conference annually, with about 550 participants. 

CEW provides free counseling to students, faculty and staff of the University as well as to women and men in the community.  Each year over 1,000 adults are seen by CEW’s professional counselors.


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Reports & Resources

2012
 
"Factors Contributing to Job Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction among Non-Tenure-Track Faculty" By Jean Waltman, Inger Bergom, Carol Hollenshead, Jeanne Miller, and Louise August. The Journal of Higher Education, May/June 2012 83:3.  
 
Success for Nontraditional Students at Elite Institution, On Campus with Women v.40, no 3. By Gloria D. Thomas and Carol Hollenshead
 
2010
 
 
2009
 
 
"Satisfaction and Discontent: Voices of Non-Tenure-Track Faculty," By Inger Bergom and Jean Waltman. In On Campus With Women, vol 37, #3, 2009.
 
2008
 
Women of Color Faculty at the University of Michigan: Recruitment, Retention, and Campus Climate. Aimee Cox, PhD, Research Investigator Center for the Education of Women, CEW Jean Campbell Research Scholar (Executive Summary)
 
 
 
Developing a Transparent Tenure Process (Resources for Deans and Chairs)
 
Enabling Junior Faculty Success (Resources for Deans and Chairs)
 
2007
 

Post-Apartheid South Africa: Creating Critically Leaderful Schools that Make a Difference, 
Juliet Perumal, University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa) and CEW Visting Scholar, 2007.

How American Men's Participation in Housework and Child-care Affects Wives' Careers. 
Renge Jibu, CEW Visiting Scholar

 
 
 
2006
Attrition Among Female Tenure-Track Faculty, paper presented at AIR, May 18, 2006, Louise August
 
A Commitment to Volunteerism. Louise August, Carol Hollenshead and Sally Schmall
 

The Gender Impact of the Proposed Michigan Civil Rights Initiative: Research Brief. 
Susan Kaufmann

 

It Isn't Over: The Continuing Under-Representation of Female Faculty, paper presented at AIR, 
May 18, 2006, Louise August.

 
Non Tenure Track Faculty: The Landscape at U.S. Institutions of Higher Education: Full Report. Includes the Executive Summary as well as tables and charts reporting analyses of the survey data.
 
 
 
 
 
 
2005
 
 
 
 

Tenure Clock, Modified Duties, and Sick Leave Policies: Creating 'A Network of Support and Understanding' for University of Michigan Faculty Women During Pregnancy and Childbirth, 
Jean Waltman and Louise August

"Gender, Family, and Flexibility in Academia" Jeanne E. Miller and Carol Hollenshead in ChangeNovember/December 2005, pp.58-62
 
2004
 
"Developing and Implementing Work – Family Policies for Faculty," Beth Sullivan, Carol Hollenshead and Gilia Smith in Academe: Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors. November-December 2004.
 
2003
 
The 2003 Michigan Women's Leadership Index: Executive Summary, produced jointly by CEW and the Detroit Women's Economic Club.
 
Women at the University of Michigan: A Statistical Report on the Status of Women Students, Staff and Faculty on the Ann Arbor Campus, compiled by staff from CEW, Human Resource Records and Information Services, and the Office of Budget and Planning. (Replaced by 2010 Report)
 
2002
 
 
Sexing the Single Girl. Deborah Siegel, CEW Visiting Scholar
 
“Work/family policies in higher education: Survey data and case studies of policy implementation" by Carol S. Hollenshead, Beth Sullivan, Gilia C. Smith, Louise August, and Susan Hamilton is a chapter of The Challenge of Balancing Faculty Careers and Family Work, New Directions in Higher Education no. 130, 2005, 41-65.
 
2001
 
 
2000
 
 
Women and Higher Education 2000: Michigan: a "Smart State" for Women? Susan Kaufmann, Sally Sharp, Jeanne E. Miller, and Jean Waltman

Women and the MBA: Gateway to Opportunity­ (Findings) A joint report from CEW, Catalyst, and the University of Michigan Business School 
Women and the MBA. The full report is available through Catalyst.

Before 2000
 
Former Women Faculty: Reasons for Leaving One Research University. Stacy A. Wenzel and Carol Hollenshead 1998

The Michigan Faculty Work-Life Study 1999. Executive SummaryComplete Report
.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Visiting Scholar Program

The Visiting Scholar Program is an opportunity for scholars to pursue research projects relevant to women using the vast resources available through the Center for the Education of Women (CEW) and the University of Michigan. Scholars must hold a Ph.D. or equivalent degree. A scholar's stay at the Center can range from one to twelve months, as appropriate to the scholar's research needs. Visiting Scholars prepare a working paper based upon their research, which is published as part of the Center's series of occasional papers.

Robin Wright Graduate Fellowship

The Center for the Education of Women announces the Robin Wright Graduate Fellowship with a grant of up to $3,200. The fund will support research by a graduate student from the Islamic World or Africa matriculating in the Rackham Graduate School.


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Institute for Research on Women and Gender

The Institute for Research on Women and Gender fosters collaboration and further the research of all U-M faculty members and graduate students who use the lens of women and gender to pursue their studies.
 
IRWG provides direct research funding and valuable expertise to those seeking external funding.
 
IRWG sponsors a wide variety of lectures, symposia, and other forums geared to faculty and students in all disciplines, at all levels. Many of our free programs appeal to the general public.
 
IRWG enables faculty members to design their own multidisciplinary, multiyear programs that examine significant issues related to women and gender.

Contact

204 South State Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1290
Ph. (734) 764-9537
Fx. (734) 764-9533
http://www.umich.edu/~irwg/
irwg@umich.edu


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Principal Staff

Sarah Fenstermaker, Director
E-mail: umsarah@umich.edu

Deborah Keller-Cohen, Senior Associate Director
E-mail: dkc@umich.edu

Hannah Rosen, Interim Associate Director
E-mail: hrosen@umich.edu

Debra M. Schwartz, Senior Public Relations Representative
E-mail: schwarde@umich.edu

Terrence W. Crimes, Business Administrator
E-mail: tcrimes@umich.edu

Lisa Parker, Contract and Grant Administrator
E-mail: wooliver@umich.edu
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

IRWG supports original, faculty-led programs that reach across the university, each one linking several U-M departments, interdisciplinary programs, or professional schools in a focused examination of a particular area or topic related to women and gender. IRWG Faculty Programs are usually funded for a two-year period, but some are long-standing.
 
IRWG welcomes program proposals that explore differences and commonalities among and between women and men in the multicultural United States and internationally. Typical programs involve a series of public events, workshops, and other creative activities that might inform a future research project or result in a publication or performance. Funding for as much as $10,000 is available for approved programs.

Click here for a list of Current Faculty Programs.

Click here for a list of Past Faculty Programs.


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Reports & Resources

Adolescents and Girls

Children's Time with Fathers in Intact Families, Pamela Davis-Kearn.

Gender, Puberty, and Objectification, Karin Martin.

Arts

Tharp, Feminism, and Postmodern Dance, Sally Banes.

Art/Girl: Graffiti, Femininity, and the Career of Lady Pink, Kristina Milnor.

No Place for a Woman? Critical Narratives and Erotic Graffiti from Pompeii, Kristina Milnor.

Family Stories/Family Pictures: Mothers With Cameras, Joanne Leonard.

Representation of Women in Art History: An Overview, Patricia Simons.

Censorship

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in Law, Abigail Carter.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in Sociology, Susannah Dolance.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in Literature, Leslie Dorfman Davis.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in Feminist Theory and Philosophy, Troy Gordon.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in Education, Edwina Hansbrough.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in the Mass Media, Edwina Hansbrough.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in Psychology, Zaje Harrell.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in Visual and Performing Arts, Libby Otto.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in Economics, Lucie Schmidt.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in American History, Chris Talbot.

Feminist Thought and Scholarship

Objectification Theory: Emotional Consequences of Sexual, Barbara Fredrickson.

Feminist Foundations: Practicing Feminism in the Community. A transcript of a panel at the conference, Feminists at Work: Multicultural, Feminist Influences on Practice, sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Program in Feminist Practice, The University of Michigan, October 16-17, 1998.

Giving It Up: Disrupting White 'Innocence,' Re-Educating White Feminism, Gail Griffin.

International Issues - Religion

The Home and Garden are a Small Paradise for Women: Men and Women Gendering Bosnjak Nationalism in Muslim Bosnia-Hercegovina, Elissa Helms (1997).

Health and Health Care

Dual Autobiography and AIDS Witnessing, Ross Chambers.

Improving Pregnancy Outcomes during Imprisonment

Initial Exposure to Nicotine in College-age Women smokers and Never-smokers, Cynthia Pomerlau.

Mental Illness and Substance abuse: Implications for Women's Health and Health Care Access, Beth Glover Reed and Carol Mowbray.

Representations of Women's Bodies and Birthing, Carolyn Sampselle.

Women and Stress, Elizabeth Young.

Mental Health

Rumination and Depression in Women, Susan Nolen-Hoeksema.

Serious Mental Illness: Women and Parenting, Carol Mowbray.

History

Telling An Untellable Story: White "Daughter" Black "Mother" After the Cuban Revolution, Ruth Behar.

Prison Discipline, Reform and Debate: Negotiating the Female Prisoner in Nineteenth-Century England, Susanna Calkins.

The Figure of the Adulteress in the Construction of the "Cult of True Womanhood" in the19th-Century American Moral Reform Literature, Lisa Cochran.

Remembering a Forgotten Past, or Why Have We Only Heard of Ballerinas, Lynn Garafola.

The Pasha's Prostitutes: Rethinking Women, the State, and Female Prostitution in Nineteenth Century Egypt, Mario Ruiz.

International Issues - Prostitution

Making A Spectacle: The Nightly Transformations of Egyptian Nightclub Performers in a Conservative Age, Katherine Zirbel.

Contraband Women, Immigration Tricks of the Sex Trade, and State Visions of Migrant Women Workers' Rights? The 1997 Toronto Massage Parlour Raids, Cheryl Harrison.

Politics

Institutional Gender Analysis: Running for the Russian Duma, Janet Johnson.

Visions of Citizenship: Questioning the Liberal Promise of Equality, Elizabeth Wingrove.

Reproductive Rights

Informed Consent Issues in Assisted Reproduction, Nancy Reame.

Recent Trends in Abortion Legislation in Central Europe, Eleonora Zielinska.

Rural Women - International Issues

The (Wo)man in the Cashew: Gender and Development in Rural Belize, Melissa Johnson.

Sexuality

Images of Fashion: Constructing the Visible Body, Olga Vainshtein.

Sports and Fitness

Your Hair is Caked, Your Limbs are Sore: Gender, "Roughing It," and Class in Early Yosemite Tourism, Stephanie Palmer.

Violence Against Women

Assessing Sexual Harassment among Latinas, Lilia Cortina.

Domestic Violence Against Women in Serbia, Zorica Mrsevic.

Offender Interventions to End Violence Against Women, Daniel Saunders.

Women of Color

Dis/Arming the Black Champ: Joe Louis and the Legacy of Racial Uplift in the Post-Civil Rights Movement, Marlon Ross.

Violence

Seng, Julia, and Mickey Sperlich. 2008. Survivor Moms: Women’s Stories of Birthing, Mothering, and Healing after Sexual Abuse.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

 
IRWG’s Faculty Seed Grant program was established in 1996. It enhances scholarship on women and gender at U-M by supporting disciplinary and interdisciplinary faculty projects. Support may be requested for individual activities, such as research assistance, research-related travel, or research materials--including books, microfilms, or similar items. Faculty Seed Grants also support collaborative projects, such as pilot studies or initial research efforts, study groups, or conference planning and implementation. Awards range from $500 to $10,000. The following criteria play some role in the award process:
 
 
In October, 2006, IRWG joined with the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts to launch the Sisters Fund, an innovative program to support vital projects that address global health issues related to women and gender. The idea for the fund came from women faculty and administrators, and in its early phase the fund was primarily supported by women—a first at U-M. Grants, varying in size from $500 to $10,000, are awarded to U-M faculty members engaged in scholarship or other creative activities that benefit local and global communities experiencing gender-based health disparities. We welcome applications from all academic disciplines, including the arts, humanities, and sciences. The Sisters Fund awards as many as two grants annually.
 
IRWG/Rackham Graduate Student Research Awards

The IRWG/Rackham Graduate Student Research Awards program provides $500 grants to U-M graduate students who are planning or conducting research, scholarship, and creative activities focusing on women and gender. These grants are for expenses such as books, travel, production or exhibition costs, software, data collection, or payment of subjects. Students at any stage in their graduate careers may apply. Although most awards are made to doctoral-level students, students currently in master’s degree programs, but planning research or creative careers, are invited to apply.

Boyd/Williams Fellowship for Research on Women & Work

The Boyd/Williams fellowship is awarded annually to a U-M doctoral student writing a dissertation related to women and work. Successful proposals promote knowledge and enhance understanding of the complexities of women’s roles in relation to their paid and unpaid labor (e.g. philanthropy, volunteerism, community involvement, domestic work, and political activity). The fellowship provides funding in the amount of $2,000.

IRWG/Rackham Community of Scholars

The Community of Scholars (COS) is a four-month summer fellowship program. It is intended to support U-M graduate students who are engaged in research, scholarship, or other creative activities that focus on women and/or gender.

 
The purpose of the IRWG Senior Scholar Visitor program  is to bring accomplished senior faculty presently employed in academic institutions outside the University of Michigan to  IRWG for up to a year  to engage in research that advances our understanding of women/gender and/or sexuality. Visiting Senior Scholars are expected to offer a public lecture, hold one master class meeting with dissertation students and participate in the intellectual environment of the institute. In selection decisions we consider the applicant's field of interest, scholarly achievement, plan of research, and fit with the institute’s current interests and intellectual community. Scholars from the United States and abroad who hold a PhD, as well as creative artists with a terminal degree in their field, are encouraged to apply. In addition to office space, IRWG will provide a $5000 stipend per term and $1000 for research/ professional expenses.

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Center for the Study of Women in Society

The University of Oregon's Center for the Study of Women in Society promotes research on the complexity of women’s lives and the intersecting nature of gender identities and inequalities. Faculty and graduate students affiliated with the Center generate and share this research with other scholars and educators, the public, policymakers, and activists. CSWS researchers come from a broad range of fields in arts and humanities, law and policy, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and the professional schools.

CSWS Mission
Generating, supporting and disseminating research on the complexity of women’s lives and the intersecting nature of gender identities and inequalities.

Contact

1201 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403
Ph. 541-346-5015
Fx. 541-346-5096
http://csws.uoregon.edu
csws@uoregon.edu


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Principal Staff

Carol Stabile, Director
Ph. (541) 346-5524
E-mail: cstabile@uoregon.edu

Gabriela Martínez, Associate Director, Coordinator of Women of Color Project
E-mail: Gmartine@uoregon.edu

Alice Evans, Communications
Ph. (541) 346-5077
E-mail: alicee@uoregon.edu

Peggy McConnell, Accounting and Grants
Ph. (541) 346-2262
E-mail: peggym@uoregon.edu

Pam Sutton, Office and Events Coordinator
Ph. (541) 346-5015
E-mail: csws@uoregon.edu
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Feminist Thought and Scholarship

Research Interest Groups. Research Interest Groups (RIG) organized by CSWS foster collaboration between scholars at the university. Faculty, graduate students, and community members participate in programs and events. RIGs are designed to facilitate collaborative research; create support groups for the preparation of grant proposals; build better connections between scholars and community activists; and generate opportunities for cross-disciplinary dialogue among scholars.

Women of Color Project

CSWS was awarded a Ford Foundation grant in March 2008 from the National Council for Research on Women (NCRW). “Diversifying the Leadership of Women’s Research Centers,” was meant to promote the leadership of women of color from historically underrepresented groups in the United States within NCRW and within its women’s research, policy, and advocacy member centers. CSWS and the UO Office of the Vice President for Research provided matching funds.

Charise Cheney, associate professor, UO Department of Ethnic Studies, continues as the 2012-13 coordinator of the CSWS Women of Color Project. Cheney’s research interests include African-American popular and political cultures, black nationalist ideologies and practices, and gender and sexuality. She is the author of Brothers Gonna Work It Out: Sexual Politics in the Golden Age of Rap Nationalism (New York: New York University Press, 2005) and is currently working on a book about black resistance to school desegregation in Topeka, Kansas in the decade before Brown v Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. She earned her PhD at the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana.

Fembot Project

Designed to re-imagine academic writing and research, the Fembot Project participates in the ongoing revolution in academic publishing, taking seriously the advice of scholars to democratize our publications by embracing open access, open source publications. The Fembot Project centrally includes a new journal—Ada: Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology—that will be broadly accessible, both in terms of physical access and in terms of its content. The Fembot website comprises three overlapping projects: Ada, Laundry Day, and a professional clearinghouse.

Women Writers Project

This group organized MemoirFest, the first annual CSWS Women Writers Symposium, held May 12, 2012. The second annual CSWS Women Writers Symposium: Common Ground, was held over Mother’s Day weekend 2013. The Women Writers Project seeks to foster and enhance opportunities for women writers on campus, in the community, and throughout the Pacific Northwest; to bring distinct voices of published women writers to campus; and to support the work of creative writing by bringing together writers from different disciplines.


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Reports & Resources

2012 CSWS Annual Review

CSWS Research Matters is published three times yearly. Each two-page article is written by a UO faculty member whose research has been supported by CSWS.

Feminist Thought and Scholarship

Sandra Morgen; Joan Acker; Jill Weigt. 2010.Stretched Thin: Poor Families, Welfare Work, and Welfare Reform. Cornell University Press.

Pascoe, Peggy. 2009. What Comes Naturally: Miscegenation Law and the Making of Race in America. Oxford.

Reis, Elizabeth. 2009. Bodies in Doubt: An American History of Intersex. Johns Hopkins University Press.

Lynn Fujiwara. 2008. Mothers without Citizenship: Asian Immigrant Families and the Consequences of Welfare Reform. University of Minnesota Press.

Microfinance

Lamia Karim, 2011. Microfinance and Its Discontents: Women in Debt in Bangladesh. University of Minnesota Press. Lamia Karim is the associate director of the Center for the Study of Women in Society and an associate professor in the University of Oregon Department of Anthropology.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Grants and Fellowships

The Center for the Study of Women in Society maintains a number of grant programs to support the work initiated by University of Oregon faculty, staff (with the appropriate end degrees), and graduate students. By providing these highly competitive grants and fellowships, CSWS consistently has supported many important research projects at various stages of development and enriched programs in all sectors of the university. The Center has offered research funding to faculty and graduate students at the University of Oregon for more than 25 consecutive years.


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Center for Gender in Organizations

The work of the Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO), an academic research institute, serves as a fundamental call to action. Our research and experience repeatedly demonstrate that gender equity and diversity greatly improve work practice and overall organizational effectiveness.
 
Gender is an organizational issue. Our research emphatically shows that businesses benefit when they view gender equity as a strategic imperative and a source of competitive advantage.

Contact

300 The Fenway
Boston, MA 02115
Ph. 617-521-3824
Fx. 617-521-3878
http://www.simmons.edu/som/centers/cgo/index.php
cgo@simmons.edu


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Principal Staff

Patricia Deyton, Director
Specialization: Nonprofit and general management, gender and diversity
E-mail: patricia.deyton@simmons.edu

Stacy Blake-Beard, Senior Faculty Affiliate
Specialization: Organization behavior, mentoring, diversity
E-mail: stacy.blakebeard@simmons.edu
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Employment Opportunities

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Gender, Equity, and Change

The Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO) takes a unique approach to addressing gender and diversity issues in the workplace. Rather than seeing gender as a problem that individual women and men confront at work, we believe gender is deeply embedded in an organization's culture and practices. It is at this level of analysis that the most significant research is undertaken and from which real change emerges.

Leadership

Understanding leadership similarities and differences of women and men as well as their resulting impact on organizations is a linchpin of the Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO) research. In addition to studying leadership issues, we also regularly examine the progress women have made in achieving leadership positions in varied organizations to understand the lessons learned and consider, as well, the contributions made by role models and mentors.

Diversity

CGO uses a "complexity lens" to understand gender and diversity. Through this lens, differences are seen as a simultaneous process of identity and institutional practices. The new insight gained through the use of this lens has led CGO to the development of a theory of simultaneity to strengthen diversity efforts. Simply stated, the theory works with the reality that all people have multiple identities, all of which are present "at the table" in any interaction and any of which may be more or less salient in any particular situation.

Globalization

Globalization research focuses on the growing interconnectedness of workforces, stemming from trends such as outsourcing, immigration and technological change. The Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO) seeks to understand the impact of multiple cultures and identities on work practices and global workforce productivity and to help ensure that traditional white, North American standards are not automatically applied to the rest of the world.

Entrepreneurship


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Reports & Resources

CGO Commentaries

CGO Commentaries are articles adapted from talks or papers delivered by our faculty affiliates and other distinguished scholars and practitioners. They highlight current and emerging topics in gender equity, diversity and organizational studies.

CGO Insights Briefing Notes

CGO Insights is a series of short briefing notes on topics promoting organizational effectiveness through improved gender equity and diversity. These are written for practitioners and scholars alike.

CGO Working Papers

CGO Working Papers disseminate trends and new developments in research, theory, and practice related to gender equity, diversity and organizational effectiveness.

Books

CGO faculty and affiliates have authored and edited more than a dozen books. CGO faculty affiliates have authored and edited many books.


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Center News

Ms. Foundation for Women

Forty years ago, four visionary women established the Ms. Foundation for Women to elevate women's voices and create positive change. Today, we're a dynamic and powerful entity that is leading the charge on women's issues nationwide.
 
We start with the knowledge that our fight is not yet over. It's true that women have come a long way since the 1970s, but for every woman who has reached the "top" (and who still face discrimination, by the way), there are millions of women struggling to earn a living wage, gain access to basic health care, secure affordable child care and participate in the opportunities that should be available to every person in the U.S.
 
At the Ms. Foundation, we work to bring attention to the real challenges facing women, especially women of color and low-income women, living in poverty, working paycheck to paycheck or both.

Contact

12 MetroTech Center
Brooklyn, NY 11201
Ph. 212/742-2300
Fx. 212/742-1653
http://forwomen.org/
info@ms.foundation.org


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Principal Staff

Anika Rahman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Deborah Jacobs, Vice President, Advocacy and Policy

Alesia Soltanpanah, Vice President, Development
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It's ridiculous and alarming that birth control and basic health services are still "controversial." We're leading the fight to protect women's reproductive rights, including abortion, access to contraception and health care, particularly in low-income communities and communities of color.
 
Equal Pay for Women

Forty years ago, a woman would earn only 56% of what a man would earn in an identical job. Today, the pay gap is stuck at 77%. We aren't satisfied, and we won't quit until women earn equal pay for equal work.
 
Affordable Child Care & Quality Child Care Jobs

Did you know that the full-time child care costs for an infant eat up 41% of the average single mother's income? Or that the very people we rely on to take care of our children earn some of the lowest wages in the country? Affordable child care and quality child care jobs are essential to the health and stability of U.S. families. We need policies that support working parents and providers and reflect real family values. 
 
 
Whether it's a colleague, friend or family member, it is likely that you know someone who has been affected by child sexual abuse. Each of us has a role to play in breaking the silence and supporting solutions. Preventing child sexual abuse is within our power, and we are working to provide information, education and resources to keep our children safe. 
 
Immigration Law that's Right for Women
 
The majority of immigrants are women – women who are often concentrated in low-wage jobs without access to health care and other benefits, women who have fewer protections from gender-based violence, and women who disproportionately suffer from failed immigration policies. We're advancing immigrants' rights in support of women.

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Reports & Resources

Click here for Ms. Foundation publications.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Grants

We believe that women are the engine for change in their communities. By funding game changing organizations that are successfully addressing pivotal issues of reproductive health; affordable child care with living wage jobs; and ending child sexual abuse – we are having real impact on the lives of women, children, families and paving the road toward a nation of justice for all.
 
As a national grantmaker, we support organizations at all levels, from grassroots to state and national organizations. We believe that women most directly impacted by an issue are the real experts and we select groups that are of the community they work in.
We choose our grantees carefully, informed by decades of work in the field. Our goals is to connect with emerging and established groups poised to act when and where change is needed.

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Catalyst

Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading nonprofit membership organization expanding opportunities for women and business. With offices in the United States, Canada, Europe, and India, and more than 500 preeminent corporations as members, Catalyst is the trusted resource for research, information, and advice about women at work. Catalyst annually honors exemplary organizational initiatives that promote women's advancement with the Catalyst Award.

Contact

120 Wall Street
New York, NY 10005
Ph. 212-514-7600
Fx. 212-514-8470
http://www.catalyst.org
info@catalyst.org


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Principal Staff

Ilene H. Lang, President & Chief Executive Officer
E-mail: ilenelang@catalyst.org

Nancy M. Carter, Senior Vice President, Research
E-mail: ncarter@catalyst.org

Michael J. Chamberlain, Vice President, Brand Management & Events
Email: mchamberlain@catalyst.org

Jan Combopiano, Vice President & Chief Knowledge Officer
E-mail: jcombopiano@catalyst.org

Jennifer Daniel-Davidson, Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President, Finance, HR & Administration
E-mail: jdaniel@catalyst.org

Heather Foust-Cummings, Ph.D., Vice President, Research
E-mail: hfoust-cummings@catalyst.org

Deborah Gillis, Chief Operating Officer
E-mail: dgillis@catalyst.org

Katherine Giscombe, Ph.D., Vice President, Diverse Women & Inclusion Research
E-mail: kgiscombe@catalyst.org
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A members-only benefit and approach to using workforce data and information to assess your diversity and inclusion “health” and drive change.  With tools, insights, events, and opportunities to connect with others, we help you diagnose where your organization excels and where it is stuck, taking you behind the numbers, testing assumptions that get in the way, and deepening understanding, so that you can define appropriate goals and create sustainable change.
 
 
Provides articulate and authoritative experts from Catalyst's executive staff and the experts from our Research and Global Member Services groups. Drawing on our extensive knowledge and wealth of hands-on experience, these speakers regularly enlighten, inform, and inspire corporate, professional, and academic audiences across the globe.

 
Serves Catalyst member organizations and their executives as a leader in the movement to diversify the boardroom. CBS helps the most senior women within Catalyst member organizations determine their potential to serve on public company boards, and assists them in formulating appropriate strategies to gain visibility as well as entrée into the boardroom. CBS serves as a referral service, yet works closely with search firms, and many other organizations that conduct searches for board directors.

 
Provides members with trusted advice and actionable insights to build and sustain workplace inclusion. Our strategy experts serve as thought partners, drawing on all of Catalyst knowledge and working closely with clients to diagnose strengths and issues, raise awareness of key opportunities, and develop customized solutions that advance women and meet the organization’s goals.  Catalyst can provide the insights and tools to make change because we know what works and why.

 
A way to stay on top of trends and get support for those who wish to make change through knowledge. Our highly experienced team of trained librarians creates knowledge products and provides efficient and comprehensive responses to information requests from Catalyst members, the media, and public-policy makers.

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Reports & Resources

Business Career

Advancing Women Leaders: The Connection Between Women Board Directors and Women Corporate Officers (2008). This research shows that the number of women on a company’s board of directors impacts the future of women in its senior leadership.

Advancing Women in Business: The Catalyst Guide to Best Practices from the Corporate Leaders (1998).

Women in Financial Services: The Word on the Street. This report on women in financial services shedes light on experiences, perceptions, and attitutudes of women in the industry and how they compare to those of male colleagues.

Women in Law: Making the Case. Catalyst's pioneering study of men's and women's career paths in the legal profession, Women in Law explores the obstascles to women's full integration into the legal profession. The report offers recommendations for legal employers on how to achieve strategic goals by retaining and developing women.

Child Care

Child Care Centers: Quality Indicators (1993). A guide for assessing a child care center by adult-child ratios, group sizes, staff qualifications, the work environment, cost, and utilization.

Child Care in Corporate America: Model Programs (1993). An analysis of corporate-sponsored child care, issues pertaining to quality, a discussion with experts, and six model programs.

Corporate Women -- Employment Issues 

Catalyst. June 7, 2013. Managers as Spnosors Toolkin Tool 7: Monitoring Your Progress-- A Sponsorship Tracker.

Catalyst. June 7, 2013. Managers as Sponsors Toolkit Tool 6: Consolidating Your Toolkit Responses—A Management Method.

Catalyst. June 17, 2013. Women CEOs and Heads of the Financial Post 500.

Catalyst.  2010. Making Mentoring Work. Written by Sarah Dinolfo, and Julie S. Nugent.

Catalyst. 2010. Making Mentoring Work—Business Case Framework . Writtent by Sarah Dinolfo,  and Julie S. Nugent.

Catalyst. 2010. Making Mentoring Work—Sample Mentoring Scorecard. Written by Sarah Dinolfo, and Julie S. Nugent.

Catalyst. 2010. Making Mentoring Work—Sample Mentor and Mentee Career Development Action Plan. Written by Sarah Dinolfo, and Julie S. Nugent.

Catalyst. 2010. Making Mentoring Work—Formal Mentoring ROI Spreadsheet Tool. Written by  Sarah Dinolfo, and Julie S. Nugent.

Catalyst 2009. 2009 Catalyst Census: Fortune 500 Women Board Directors. Writtent by Heather Foust-Cummings and Emily Pomeroy.

Cracking the Glass Ceiling: Strategies for Success (1999). Case studies on how major corporations remove glass ceiling barriers.

Catalyst Census of Women Directors of the Fortune 500 (1998). Published annually since 1993, it lists the women who serve on Fortune 500 boards and how many women are on each company's board.

Catalyst Census of Women Corporate Officers and Top Earners (1998). An annual census showing how women rank among the highest paid executives, which companies and industries have the most female officers, and which states have the highest concentration of women at the top.

Closing the Gap: Women's Advancement in Corporate and Professional Canada (1998). Based on a survey of more than 400 high-level women and nearly 200 chief executives in Canada's largest corporations and professional firms, this study includes the varying perspectives of senior women and chief executives on what holds women back from the top.

Women in Corporate Leadership: Progress and Prospects (1996). A survey of top women managers offering testimony from the women who have made it, as well as the views of Fortune 1000 CEOs.

Knowing the Territory: Women in Sales (1995). Sales representatives, human resources professionals, and sales managers from major American companies discuss what sales organizations can do to attract, retain, and advance women.

The CEO View: Women on Corporate Boards (1995). America's Fortune 1000 CEOs discuss what they expect from female directors and offer insight into the written and unwritten criteria for board nomination.

Women on Corporate Boards: The Challenge of Change (1993). A report about female directors' backgrounds, their expectations of and experience on corporate boards, their feelings about advocacy for women's issues, and the ways in which they relate to female employees of companies on whose boards they serve.

Mentoring: A Guide to Corporate Programs and Practices (1993). A report describing how to identify and advance high-potential women, recruit and train new employees, and avoid common problems.

Creating Successful Mentoring Programs: A Catalyst Guide. This guide teaches you how to identify and advance high-potential women, recruit and train new employees, and avoid common pitfalls of formal mentoring programs. This recently updated report takes you step-by-step through implementing a formal mentoring program.

Women in Corporate Management: Model Programs for Development and Mobility (1991). A report on 17 Fortune 500 companies with exemplary programs for women and why these initiatives are successful.

Creating Women's Networks: A How-To Guide for Women and Companies. A guide to starting and sustaining women's workplace networks based on Catalyst's work.

On The Line: Women's Career Advancement. A report outlining barriers women face and recommending strategies for overcoming them, including examples of America's newest and most creative policies for helping women advance.

Entrepreneurship

Women Entrepreneurs: Why Companies Lose Female Talent and What They Can Do About It (1998). A joint project with the National Foundation for Women Business Owners and The Committee of 200, it discusses the fact that women are starting new businesses at twice the rate of men.

Feminist Thought and Scholarship

The Catalyst Award: Setting the Standard for Women's Advancement. Details Catalyst Award winning initiatives from 1987 to 1997.

Science and Technology

Women in Engineering: An Untapped Resource (1992). Recommendations of what companies can do to attract, retain, and advance women engineers, including initiatives that address barriers, perceptions of male counterparts, and job satisfaction.

Women Scientists in Industry: A Winning Formula for Companies. A study identifying factors in the corporate culture that contribute to or impede the career advancement of women scientists.

Women of Color -- Corporate Women

Catalyst. 2009. Women of Color in U.S. Law Firms - Women of Color in Professional Services Series. Written by Deepali Bagati.

Women of Color in Corporate Management: Opportunities and Barriers (1999). The third part of the study that looks at women of color's expectations, experiences, and perceptions of corporate culture and how they affect the women's job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and intent to stay with the company.

Women of Color in Corporate Management: Dynamics of Career Advancement (1998). A discussion of what African-American, Asian-American, and Latina women perceive as barriers to advancement in corporate America. Read Catalyst's recommendations on what companies can do to retain and advance this important segment of their talent pool.

Women of Color in Corporate Management: A Statistical Picture (1997). A combination of census data and previously unpublished information from Catalyst's Women in Corporate Leadership study presents a demographic overview of women managers of color.

International

Catalyst. June 12, 2013. First Step: India Overview

Work and Family

Catalyst. 2008. Making Change-Beyond Flexibility: Work-Life Effectiveness as an Organizational Tool for High Performance. Written by Lisa D'Annolfo Levey, Aimee Horowitz, and Meryle Mahrer Kaplan. 

Two Careers, One Marriage: Making It Work in the Workplace (1998). Based on the responses of almost 1,000 dual-career earners and aimed at employers, this study describes the issues that mean the most to these couples.

A New Approach to Flexibility: Managing the Work/Time Equation (1997). An assessment of flexible work arrangements describes strategies and solutions.

Making Work Flexible: Policy to Practice (1996). A guide on helping organizations and managers implement and manage flexible work arrangements in corporations and professional firms.

Flexible Work Arrangements II: Succeeding with Part-Time Options (1993). Findings from the first longitudinal study of flexible work arrangements and their effect on employees' career growth.

The Corporate Guide to Parental Leaves (1992). A manual to help employers plan or update a cost-effective parental leave policy, created before the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 went into effect.

Weekly Blog


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Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships


 
Annually honors innovative organizational approaches with proven, measurable results that address the recruitment, development, and advancement of all women, including diverse women. Since 1987, Catalyst has recognized 82 initiatives at 76 organizations from around the world. These groundbreaking diversity and inclusion programs have changed workplaces, communities, and lives.
 
Become a member
 
Catalyst membership is a high-value partnership that gives your organization—and various stakeholders within it—access to a variety of indispensable benefits. To help you build an inclusive workplace, Catalyst will provide innovative research, the tools to make change, examples of successful initiatives, networking and knowledge-sharing events, a powerful array of services, and access to the unique Catalyst community of leaders committed to expanding opportunities for women and business.

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Barnard Center for Research on Women

Since its founding in 1971, the Barnard Center for Research on Women (BCRW) has been at the very forefront of feminist action and scholarship. BCRW promotes women’s and social justice issues in the local spheres of the Barnard College community and academic and activist networks in New York City, as well as having a voice in national and transnational feminist organizing and research. We are a well-recognized nexus of feminist thought, activism, and collaboration for scholars and activists alike.
 
BCRW’s mission, “to assure that women can live and work in dignity, autonomy, and equality,” is pursued through programming and events, production and distribution of print- and web-based publications, and collaboration with local and national activist and academic networks.

Contact

3009 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
Ph. 212/854-2067
Fx. 212/854-8294
http://www.barnard.edu/bcrw
bcrw@barnard.edu


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Principal Staff

Janet Jakobsen, Ph.D., Director
E-mail: jjakobsen@barnard.edu

Catherine Sameh, Ph.D., Associate Director
E-mail: csameh@barnard.edu

Anne Jonas, Program Manager
E-mail: ajonas@barnard.edu

Pam Phillips, Administrative Assistant
E-mail: pphillips@barnard.edu

Hope Dector, New Media Management
E-mail: hdector@barnard.edu
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S&FOnline

The Scholar & Feminist Online, a triannual, multimedia, online-only journal of feminist theories and women's movements, provides public access to the Barnard Center for Research on Women's most innovative programming by providing written transcripts, audio and visual recordings, and links to relevant intellectual and social action networks. The journal builds on these programs by publishing related scholarship and other applicable resources. A forum for scholars, activists, and artists whose work articulates the ever-evolving role of feminism in struggles for social justice, S&F Online brings you the latest in cutting-edge theory and practice.

New Feminist Solutions

Marking the newest direction in BCRW's more than thirty-five-year-old tradition of print publication, New Feminist Solutions is a series of reports geared toward informing and inspiring activists, policy-makers and others. Each report was written in collaboration with organizations and individuals who, like BCRW, have made a concerted effort to link feminist struggles to those of racial, economic, social and global justice. The reports are based on conversations and ideas emerging from conferences held at Barnard College, and are published in conjunction with websites featuring additional information from these events. Copies of the reports are free. They can be downloaded from the New Feminist Solutions website. Print copies can be requested by emailing bcrw@barnard.edu.

BCRW Newsletter

Published biannually, the BCRW newsletter provides event information and feature articles that communicate some of the broader issues engaged by the events, thus providing readers with a new way of understanding the work of the Center as a whole.

Guide to NYC Women's and Social Justice Organizations

This rich guide puts you in touch with the artists, activists and organizations whose work is most crucial to you. You'll find valuable information from nearly five hundred citywide organizations that work for sexual, racial, economic and social justice. The directory reflects our longtime commitment to building far-reaching, and sometimes unexpected coalitions.


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