Corporations

The largest companies in the U.S. – those with gross annual revenues of at least $20 billion – report a larger representation of women and other underrepresented groups on their boards of directors. Seventy percent have at least two women and 53 percent have two or more directors from underrepresented groups. Women managers, however, are increasingly opting out of high-end careers when companies fail to meet their professional needs and goals. Fewer than 15 percent of Fortune 500 officers and directors are women, and graduate business schools (unlike law and medical schools) have far fewer women than men applicants. NCRW is supporting efforts to make the corporate environment more welcoming and the career ladder more accessible to women and people of color.

The Challenge and the Charge: Strategies for Retaining and Advancing Women of Color

 In its recent report, Re:Gender features four exceptional women of color business leaders and explores the lessons learned by eight innovative companies that developed strategies for promoting the advancement of women of color.  The report outlines why this makes economic sense, and identifies ways diversity advocates can create more inclusive institutions that attract, support, and retain women of color in the corporate sector and beyond.

Download the report

 

 

 

Teaser: 

In its recent report, Re:Gender features four exceptional women of color business leaders and explores the lessons learned by eight innovative companies that developed strategies for promoting the advancement of women of color.

Diversity drives diversity: From the boardroom to the C-suite

EY

Incremental changes in gender diversity continued across boardrooms and C-suites at US companies in 2013.
The data reveals that these incremental changes may be transformative over time: putting women on the board and in leadership roles drives further diversification — across gender, tenure and age — in the boardroom and across the executive pipeline.

 

 

URL: 
http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/EY-Diversity-drives-diversity/$FILE/EY-Diversity-drives-diversity.pdf

Gender & Negotiation – Part 2

The field of negotiation and gender embodies over 35 years of research from various academic disciplines. On this page, the Council presents a small annotated collection of different perspectives on gender and negotiation.

Title: Determinants and Consequences of Salary Negotiations by Male and Female MBA Graduates
Author(s): Gerhart, Barry; Rynes, Sara
Published: 1991
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Psychology (1991), Vol. 76, No. 2, pp. 256–262
Document available online at: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/apl/76/2/256/

Job Growth Remains Steady for Both Women and Men

SeeJob Growth Remains Steady for Both Women and Men

From: Institute for Women's Policy Research

Author: Institute for Women's Policy Research

Date Published: July 2013

 

According to the IWPR analysis of the July employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), job growth for both women and men continued to improve in June compared to the previous month. Of the 195,000 total jobs added to nonfarm payrolls, women gained 113,000 jobs (58 percent) while men gained 82,000 jobs (42 percent).

Teaser: 

 According to the IWPR analysis of the July employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), job growth for both women and men continued to improve in June compared to the previous month. Of the 195,000 total jobs added to nonfarm payrolls, women gained 113,000 jobs (58 percent) while men gained 82,000 jobs (42 percent).

Associated Issues & Expertise:

Why Negotiation is Only Part of the Solution

Did you know that women are more likely to face negative social consequences for negotiating?  This seems to go against the pervasive notion that women effectively negotiating for high salaries will be a magic bullet for closing the wage gap.  According to Hannah Riley Bowles, Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, and Linda Babcock, Carnegie Mellon University, in their article How Can Women Escape the Compensation Negotiation Dilemma? Relational Accounts Are One Answer, “…women entering compensation negotiations face a dilemma: They have to weigh the benefits of negotiating against the social consequences of having negotiated.”


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Going beyond Women’s Ambition: Diversifying Corporate Leadership from All Angles

*By Áine Duggan*

In his recent  LinkedIn post, PricewaterhouseCooper’s (PwC) Bob Moritz, Chairman and Senior Partner, shares steps CEOs can take to tackle the challenge of diversifying corporate leadership and closing the gap.  Bob, one of our 2013 “Making a Difference for Women” Award recipients, highlights accountability, inclusivity, and awareness, all of which seem to be common sense. However, it is in implementation of these principles, or lack thereof, where some companies miss the mark and PwC leads.  Bob acknowledges that the solution goes beyond women’s ambition, requiring work by institutions and individuals, BOTH men and women.  We all need to work together, not just to discuss what needs to be done, but to take action.


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