Corporations

The largest companies in the U.S. – those with gross annual revenues of at least $20 billion – report a larger representation of women and other underrepresented groups on their boards of directors. Seventy percent have at least two women and 53 percent have two or more directors from underrepresented groups. Women managers, however, are increasingly opting out of high-end careers when companies fail to meet their professional needs and goals. Fewer than 15 percent of Fortune 500 officers and directors are women, and graduate business schools (unlike law and medical schools) have far fewer women than men applicants. NCRW is supporting efforts to make the corporate environment more welcoming and the career ladder more accessible to women and people of color.

Unlocking the full potential of women at work

Since 2007, McKinsey has been researching intensively the advancement of women in the workplace. The business benefits are clear: a wider, deeper swath of talent to solve problems, spark innovation, and, in many cases, mirror a company’s own customer base.

URL: 
http://www.mckinsey.com/Client_Service/Organization/Latest_thinking/Women_at_work

Women and Men in Canadian Capital Markets: An Action Plan for Gender Diversity

Despite more than a decade of concerted advocacy and good intentions by the industry, women continue to struggle to break through the senior leadership ranks in Canadian Capital Markets- and into the industry. According to Women and Men in Canadian Capital Markets: An Action Plan for Gender Diversity, released at a Women in Capital Markets luncheon, Catalyst found the informality of male-dominated networks, the fact that poor managerial skills are too easily overlooked and the persistent stigma around work-life balance continue to impact women's advancement.

URL: 
http://www.wcm.ca/default.aspx?tabid=10000029

Gender diversity on Boards: the Appointment process and the role of executive search firms.

The appointment of women to FTSE 350-listed non-executive director roles is being held back by selection processes which ultimately favour candidates with similar characteristics to existing male-dominated board members, according to a new report released today by the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

The report, produced by Cranfield School of Management for the Equality and Human Rights Commission, is the first in-depth study into the appointment process to corporate boards and the role of executive search firms. It follows the recent Davies Review which called upon executive search firms to take on a more active role in increasing gender diversity on FTSE boards.

URL: 
http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/uploaded_files/research/rr85_final.pdf
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