Corporations

The largest companies in the U.S. – those with gross annual revenues of at least $20 billion – report a larger representation of women and other underrepresented groups on their boards of directors. Seventy percent have at least two women and 53 percent have two or more directors from underrepresented groups. Women managers, however, are increasingly opting out of high-end careers when companies fail to meet their professional needs and goals. Fewer than 15 percent of Fortune 500 officers and directors are women, and graduate business schools (unlike law and medical schools) have far fewer women than men applicants. NCRW is supporting efforts to make the corporate environment more welcoming and the career ladder more accessible to women and people of color.

The Bottom Line: Connecting Corporate Performance and Gender Diversity

Study explores the link between gender diversity in top management teams and US corporate financial performance in the second half of the 1990s.
 

URL: 
http://www.catalyst.org/file/44/the%20bottom%20line%20connecting%20corporate%20performance%20and%20gender%20diversity.pdf

Leaders in a Global Economy: A Study of Executive Men and Women

The Leaders in a Global Economy project grew out of the concerns of a group of companies.
These companies had already identified the growing need for attracting, developing and
retaining women as a key competitive business strategy, and they had been working on doing
so for a number of years. Despite their progress, however, they felt there were still many challenges—
both subtle and overt—to overcome. They wanted to better understand these challenges
on a global basis so they could develop new approaches and strategies to address the
advancement of both women and men.

URL: 
http://familiesandwork.org/site/research/summary/globalsumm.pdf

Women in the Executive Suite Correlate to High Profits

An extensive 19-year study of 215 Fortune 500 firms shows a strong correlation between a strong record of promoting women into the executive suite and high profitability, demonstrating that Fortune 500 firms that do promote women to high positions are 18-69% more profitable.
 

URL: 
http://www.women2top.net/download/home/adler_web.pdf

Not Just the Right Thing, the Bright Thing

In May of 2002, The Conference Board of Canada published findings of their study on women and corporate governance. 

The report suggests a link between female numbers on boards and good-governance credentials.
 

URL: 
http://www.20-first.com/10-0-better-corporate-governance.html

Top Fund Managers of the Decade Nominees Reflect Scarcity of Women

December 14, 2009 Posted by Vivienne Heston-Demirel


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