Corporations

The largest companies in the U.S. – those with gross annual revenues of at least $20 billion – report a larger representation of women and other underrepresented groups on their boards of directors. Seventy percent have at least two women and 53 percent have two or more directors from underrepresented groups. Women managers, however, are increasingly opting out of high-end careers when companies fail to meet their professional needs and goals. Fewer than 15 percent of Fortune 500 officers and directors are women, and graduate business schools (unlike law and medical schools) have far fewer women than men applicants. NCRW is supporting efforts to make the corporate environment more welcoming and the career ladder more accessible to women and people of color.

Center for Women and Work

As part of its multi-faceted research and policy work, The School of Management and Labor Relations' Center for Women and Work (CWW):
  • Addresses women’s advancement in the workplace
  • Conducts cutting-edge research on successful public and workplace policies
  • Provides technical assistance and programs to educators, industry, and governments
  • Engages issues that directly affect the living standards of New Jersey’s and the nation’s working families

Contact

50 Labor Center Way
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
Ph. (848) 932-4614

http://smlr.rutgers.edu/CWW
cww@rci.rutgers.edu


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Principal Staff

Eileen Appelbaum, Co-Director
E-mail: eappelba@rci.rutgers.edu

Patricia A. Roos, Co-Director, Center for Women and Work
Ph. (732) 445-0974
E-mail: roos@rutgers.edu

Terri Boyer, Ed.D., Executive Director and Director, Education and Workforce Development Research
Ph. (732) 932-5473
E-mail: terri.boyer@rutgers.edu

Connie A. Ellis, Corporate Programs Director
Ph. (732) 932-2030
E-mail: ellisc@rci.rutgers.edu

Suzanne C. Eng, Program Coordinator, Education and Career Development Programs
Ph. (732) 932-5472
E-mail: sceng@rci.rutgers.edu
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

College Completion in the Workforce Development System

With a grant from the Lumina Foundation, CWW along with the National Association of Workforce Boards (NAWB), is working to establish a model for state and federal workforce development systems to incorporate college completion as a training option. The project primarily serves individuals who are 0 to 12 credits away from earning an associate’s or bachelor’s degree. CWW is conducting a study on this new model in three states: Colorado, Mississippi, and Pennsylvania. A fourth state participant is to be determined.

Colorado Online Energy Training Consortium (COETC)

CWW is conducting formative/process and summative/outcome evaluation on the COETC program. This initiative is being put in place in 15 community colleges throughout Colorado. These schools will develop and offer energy-related degree options and certificate programs tailored to industry specifications and job demands. The initiative aims to train workers in online and hybrid energy programs to connect workers with sustaining wages and career advancement. This grant is part of the federal Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant program.

Colorado Sector Strategy Evaluation
 
CWW is conducting formative/process and summative/outcome evaluation on the Colorado Sector Strategy Initiative. In 2009 the Colorado Department of Labor and the Colorado Workforce Development Council announced the Colorado SECTORS Planning Grants, which were awarded through a competitive process to workforce regions or sub-regions. In total, 10 grants were awarded, targeting the aerospace, health care, manufacturing, renewable energy, and water/wastewater management sectors. CWW is evaluating how this program works and its effectiveness through a summative/outcome evaluation.

Women's Leadership and Advancement

Women’s Leadership and Advancement addresses the needs of working women by studying public policies, conducting research and sponsoring educational programs for students and experienced professionals. The Center for Women and Work and the Institute for Women’s Leadership collaborate to provide programs that will develop women leaders from the college classroom to the boardroom.

WINGS (Women Investing in and Guiding Students)

A college to career program for undergraduate female students to learn about the mentoring process before they enter the workforce.

Senior Leadership Program for Professional Women

Designed for women in top leadership roles. The program illustrates how women can achieve and maintain their roles as effective leaders at the senior level.

The Corporate Forum

An invited group of member corporations that are committed to women’s leadership, workplace diversity, and organizational effectiveness. This small group of senior executives meets annually with Center faculty and staff to discuss topics of interest to the Forum members, as well as other organizational challenges and accomplishments.


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Reports & Resources

Legal Talent at the Crossroads: Why New Jersey Women Lawyers Leave Their Law Firms, and Why They Choose to Stay, 2009 Report.

New Jersey's Women in Science and Technology 2008 Summit Report.

New Jersey Women Count (1994), a compilation of social indicators regarding the status of women in New Jersey.
Women and Unions: Forging a Partnership, ed. Professor Sue Cobble (1993).

"The Role of Family Status in Explaining Race Differences in Access to Hierarchical Authority Structures among Women," CWW Working Paper, Ryan A. Smith and dt ogilvie (1990-1991).

 


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Center News

Effective_Philanthropy

Mary Ellen S. Capek is a Principal in Capek & Associates, a philanthropic and nonprofit research and consulting group based in Corrales, New Mexico, and a Visiting Scholar at the Anderson Schools of Management at the University of New Mexico.

Teaser: 

Organizational Success Through Deep Diversity & Gender Equality (by Mary Ellen Capek, Former Executive Director)

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Women in Fund Management: A Road Map for Achieving Critical Mass — and Why it Matters

For more than a quarter century, the National Council for Research on Women, now Re:Gender, has promoted the advancement of women and girls and highlighted the benefits of women’s participation, active engagement and leadership in decision-making. In this project, the Council brings this same lens to the historically male-dominated spaces of fund management and the financial services more broadly.

Our report, Women in Fund Management: A Road Map for Achieving Critical Mass – and Why it Matters, explores the under-representation of women in the field, draws on research suggesting the benefits women can bring, and lays out concrete action steps for change. Specifically, we call on the financial services industry to develop a “critical mass principle” with quantifiable benchmarks and guidelines for increasing the number of women at all leadership levels.

Teaser: 

For more than a quarter century, the National Council for Research on Women, now Re:Gender, has promoted the advancement of women and girls and highlighted the benefits of women’s participation, active engagement and leadership in decision-making. In this project, the Council brings this same lens to the historically male-dominated spaces of fund management and the financial services more broadly.

Cover Image: 
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