Corporations

The largest companies in the U.S. – those with gross annual revenues of at least $20 billion – report a larger representation of women and other underrepresented groups on their boards of directors. Seventy percent have at least two women and 53 percent have two or more directors from underrepresented groups. Women managers, however, are increasingly opting out of high-end careers when companies fail to meet their professional needs and goals. Fewer than 15 percent of Fortune 500 officers and directors are women, and graduate business schools (unlike law and medical schools) have far fewer women than men applicants. NCRW is supporting efforts to make the corporate environment more welcoming and the career ladder more accessible to women and people of color.

2011 UC Davis Study of California Women Business Leaders: A Census of Women Directors and Highest-Paid Executives

California’s Glass Ceiling May Take a Century to Crack.

The UC Davis Graduate School of Management in partnership with Watermark publishes the annual "UC Davis Study of California Women Business Leaders: A Census of Women Directors and Executive Officers."

Our seventh annual study details the presence of women at the very top of the 400 largest publicly held corporations headquartered in the state. Our findings paint a disappointing picture of female representation on the boards and in the executive suites of these high-profile companies, which together represent nearly $3 trillion in shareholder value.

Women still hold fewer than one in 10 of the highest-paid executive positions and board seats at the top public firms in California — a rate that has improved by just 0.2 percent annually.

Key Findings of the 2011 Study

URL: 
http://gsm.ucdavis.edu/digital-publication/2011-uc-davis-study-california-women-business-leaders

The Progress and Pitfalls of Diversity on Wall Street

More minorities and women are working on Wall Street, but white men remain very dominant when it comes to the financial rewards available there, according to a new report issued by CUNY's Center for Urban Research (CUR), which is located at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY).

URL: 
http://www.urbanresearch.org/news/new-report-progress-and-pitfalls-of-diversity-on-wall-street

Women in the Boardroom: A Global Perspective

Women in the Boardroom: A Global Perspective, examines the legislative efforts being pursued across 17(i) countries to encourage more women to serve on listed company boards.

The updated edition of the report, by the Deloitte Global Center for Corporate Governance, comes after numerous governmental developments have evolved in several countries since the January 2011 publishing of the first edition. The new research highlights a variety of approaches to support diversity on boards, including requiring more disclosure, setting targets, and implementing quotas. According to the study, strong variations exist among countries regarding the most efficient way to achieve higher levels of diversity.

URL: 
http://www.corpgov.deloitte.com/binary/com.epicentric.contentmanagement.servlet.ContentDeliveryServlet/USEng/Documents/Nominating-Corporate%20Governance%20Committee/Board%20Composition%20and%20Recruitment/Women%20in%20the%20Boardroom_Deloitte_111511.pdf

Canadian Board Diversity Council's Annual Report Card 2011

Some disconcerting findings on the lack of diversity in the boardrooms of Canada's largest corporations were released today in the Canadian Board Diversity Council's Second Annual Report Card.
 
While 73 per cent of corporate board members feel their boards are diverse, the reality is that women are significantly less likely than men to serve on corporate boards. In fact, most board members oppose the development and adoption of a formal diversity policy.
 
Pamela Jeffery, Founder of the Canadian Board Diversity Council (CBDC), says it is time for Canada's board directors to speed up the pace of change. "Directors whose boards have re-defined diversity believe they make better board decisions as a result of this diversity," Jeffery explains. "That's because important, diverse perspectives on customers, international markets and stakeholders that were once missing are now being represented.
URL: 
http://www.wxnetwork.com/content/files/final-cbdc_report2011_eng_14-2.pdf
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