Work:life Balance

Flexible work arrangements and policies that address caregiving roles result in paybacks for both employers and employees. Research shows that employees with a satisfying work/life balance are more productive, creative, innovative and motivated at work and are less likely to leave their positions. Flexibility also encourages gender diversity in the workplace by easing the way for women to stay on their chosen career tracks while providing caregiving to children and family members or pursuing other interests and responsibilities.

Tipped Over the Edge - Gender Inequity in the Restaurant Industry

 The report shows that women who work in the industry face systematic discrimination, poverty wages, a lack of sick days, and five times more harassment than the general female workforce. One major cause of poverty for these working women is that restaurant lobbyists have succeeded in keeping the federal minimum wage for servers and other tipped workers frozen at only $2.13 per hour for the past 20 years.

URL: 
http://rocunited.org/blog/tipped-over-the-edge-gender-inequity-in-the-restaurant-industry/

ACTION BRIEF: WOMEN AND MONEY

Women: Let’s Talk About Retirement The 12 th Annual Transamerica Retirement Survey

 Women of all ages share dreams of retirement that include traveling, spending time with family and friends, and pursuing hobbies, but only 8 percent strongly agree that they are building a large enough retirement nest egg, according to research released by the non-profit Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies® (“The Center”). As part of its 12th Annual Transamerica Retirement Survey, the Center surveyed over 1,800 American women workers to understand where their outlook stands today and what approaches could help them make their retirement futures brighter.

URL: 
http://www.transamericacenter.org/resources/TCRS12thAnnualSurveyWomenReport.pdf

The Female Vision: Women's Real Power at Work

At an NCRW expert panel on September 29, 2010 at American Express, authors Sally Helgesen and Julie Johnson provided compelling evidence for the view that companies with both women and men in strategic leadership positions have a competitive advantage over companies that do not. The particular strengths of women - their broad-spectrum vision, empathy
and interpersonal skills, and their value-based, collaborative style - are increasingly recognized, but still under-valued in assessing leadership potential.

Building a Pipeline to Women's Leadership

NCRW held an expert panel on February 28, 2011 at American Express with senior leaders from business, government, and academia to explore the case for, barriers to, and action steps needed to expand the number of women in leadership positions. While many overt barriers to women’s advancement have been largely dismantled, and the pipeline to leadership is filled with highly qualified women, the embedded prejudices in our institutions and culture as well as the expectations women have for their professional and personal lives, especially younger women, still pose challenges.

Syndicate content