Barriers & Opportunities

For businesses that want to compete in the global marketplace, the development of a culturally and internationally competent work force is fundamental to success. Business professionals increasingly seek out international experience as a key to professional development and advancement. The stakes are high, therefore, to ensure that global assignments are both readily available and successful. Yet women lag behind men in taking on international transfers, and the hurdles they face – “trailing” spouses, competing family and community responsibilities, inadequate training, challenging timetables and disadvantages on repatriation – are generally more numerous for women than for men. Through NCRW’s network, professionals and HR leaders are provided with the information they need to develop a business case for change as well as best practices for developing a more diversified talent pool.

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
42° 19' 0.3072" N, 71° 3' 31.2876" W

Carol Hardy-Fanta is Director of the Center for Women in Politics and Public Policy at UMass Boston's John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy Studies. She received her Ph.D. in Public Policy from Brandeis University's Heller School, an MSW from Smith College, and a B.A. from Occidental College. Dr. Hardy-Fanta is author of three books: Latina Politics, Latino Politics: Gender, Culture, and Political Participation in Boston (Temple University Press, 1993), Latino Politics in Massachusetts: Struggles, Strategies and Prospects (Routledge Press, 2002), and Intersectionality and Politics: Recent Research on Gender, Race, and Political Representation in the United States (Haworth Press, 2006) . She is a nationally recognized scholar on Latina/o politics and has published widely on the intersection of gender, race and ethnicity in politics and public policy.

Location

Boston, MA 02125
United States
42° 19' 0.3072" N, 71° 3' 31.2876" W

Women Are Business Risk-Takers Too, Study Says

Member Organization: 
Center for Gender in Organizations
 
LONDON, England (CNN) -- Even in an era in which gender equality within business corporations is an officially-acknowledged -- if by no means fully realized -- idea, it seems there are some supposed distinctions between the sexes which are still ok to make.
 
One of these involves risk: Female managers, goes the maxim still trotted out in many business schools, are less likely to bet the company on an audacious gamble, or stack millions against rec

Realize Your New Year’s Resolution—negotiate!

January 11, 2010 posted by admin

Originally posted by Ruth Schechter January 7, 2010 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Position and Nuance the Key to Effective Negotiations for Women


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Top Fund Managers of the Decade Nominees Reflect Scarcity of Women

December 14, 2009 Posted by Vivienne Heston-Demirel


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National Women’s Business Council

The Economic Impact of Women-Owned Businesses in the United States, October 2009
The Center for Women’s Business Research, with support from the National Women’s Business Council and Walmart, undertook a study to establish the economic impact of women-owned businesses on the U.S. economy. This study provides a clear picture of the value and impact of this segment to the economy and a roadmap for the future.
 

URL: 
http://www.nwbc.gov/ResearchPublications/documents/EconomicImpactReport.pdf

The Shriver Report: Executive Summary

For the first time in our nation’s history, women are half of all U.S. workers and mothers are the primary breadwinners or co-breadwinners in nearly two-thirds of American families. This is a dramatic shift from just a generation ago (in 1967 women made up only one-third of all workers).
 

URL: 
http://www.awomansnation.com/execSum.php

Motherhood penalty remains a pervasive problem in the workplace

December 1, 2009 posted by Ruth Schechter

Originally posted November 22, 2009 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Mothers looking for employment are less likely to be hired, are offered lower salaries and are perceived as being less committed to a job than fathers or women without children, according to a recent study of gender inequality in the workplace. What’s more, the pay gap between mothers and childless women is actually bigger than the pay gap between women and men.


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Women Use Science, Engineering, to Pierce Vitreous Ceiling

Office of Science and Technology Policy
It was a record-breaking year for women in science, as anyone who tracked the Nobel Prizes knows. But the struggle to attract and retain more girls and women to careers in science, math, and engineering is far from over. That’s why the Obama administration is pursuing a number of strategies aimed at getting ever more women to join the scientific ranks in the years and decades ahead.
 

URL: 
http://blog.ostp.gov/2009/10/20/women-use-science-engineering-to-pierce-vitreous-ceiling/
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