Barriers & Opportunities

For businesses that want to compete in the global marketplace, the development of a culturally and internationally competent work force is fundamental to success. Business professionals increasingly seek out international experience as a key to professional development and advancement. The stakes are high, therefore, to ensure that global assignments are both readily available and successful. Yet women lag behind men in taking on international transfers, and the hurdles they face – “trailing” spouses, competing family and community responsibilities, inadequate training, challenging timetables and disadvantages on repatriation – are generally more numerous for women than for men. Through NCRW’s network, professionals and HR leaders are provided with the information they need to develop a business case for change as well as best practices for developing a more diversified talent pool.

New York Women's Foundation

At The New York Women’s Foundation®, we work together to transform the conditions of poverty and provide for economic security, advocate for anti-violence and safety issues, as well as health, sexual rights and reproductive justice all helping to build a city where women, families and communities thrive through shared power and sustained justice and security.

Our work is rooted in a tradition of educating and engaging women of all means about the power of our collective action as activist philanthropists. We know that we can have a greater impact when we work together, leveraging our financial and intellectual resources for individuals and families to empower themselves to affect long-term systemic change. It is this singular commitment of women helping women that sets The New York Women’s Foundation apart from more traditional philanthropic organizations locally and nationally.

Contact

39 Broadway
New York, NY 10006
Ph. 212-514-6993

http://www.nywf.org/
info@nywf.org


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Principal Staff

Ana L. Oliveira, President & Chief Executive Officer
Ph. (646) 564-5960
E-mail: aoliveira@nywf.org

Talatha Kiazolu-Reeves, Vice President of Operations and Strategic Learning
Ph. (646) 564-5962
E-mail: treeves@nywf.org

Jacqueline Ebanks, Vice President of Programs
Ph. (646) 564-5970
E-mail: jebanks@nywf.org

Ruth Sarlin, Vice President of Communications
Ph. (646) 564-5988
E-mail: rsarlin@nywf.org

Susan Fulwiler, Vice President of Development
Ph. (646) 564-5980
E-mail: sfulwiler@nywf.org
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

 
The Foundation supports organizations and programs that are working to eradicate gender–based violence and create safe communities.

 
The Foundation supports organizations and programs that enable women and girls living at or below the poverty level to achieve and sustain economic security and advance economic justice through: Education, Employment, Work Supports, Training, and Asset Building.
 
 
The Foundation supports organizations and programs that recognize and promote health as a fundamental right and necessity for achieving and sustaining individuals’ complete mental, spiritual, political, economic, and social well–being.

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Reports & Resources

 
 
Provides an in-depth analysis of the economic security, health and safety, and well-being of women in the 59 community districts. It analyzes issues that shape the lives of women and girls, including poverty, income and employment; violence and safety; and education and health.
 
 
 
Gender Budget Analysis Reports
 
 
 


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Center News

Women's Studies Program

The Program in Women's Studies at Duke University is dedicated to exploring gender identities, relations, practices, theories and institutions. In the field's first decades, feminist scholarship reoriented traditional disciplines toward the study of women and gender and developed new methodologies and critical vocabularies that have made interdisciplinarity a key feature of Women's Studies as an autonomous field. Today, scholars continue to explore the meaning and impact of identity as a primary though by no means transhistorical or universal way of organizing social life by pursuing an intersectional analysis of gender, race, sexuality, class, and nationality. In the classroom, as in our research, our goal is to transform the university's organization of knowledge by reaching across the epistemological and methodological divisions of historical, political, philosophical, economic, representational, technological and scientific analysis.

Contact

210 East Duke Building
Durham , NC 27708
Ph. (919) 668-2548
Fx. (919) 684-4871
http://womenstudies.duke.edu
cfhharri@duke.edu


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Principal Staff

Ranjana Khanna, Program Director
Ph. (919) 668-2548
E-mail: rkhanna@duke.edu
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

 
For the past few years, Duke Women's Studies has had a programming theme which has attached to it a fall grad and post grad seminar, a film series, and other events throughout the year. Last year the theme was "Future of the Feminist '70s" and the year before it was "The Question of Species" (focused on human/non-human connections). The theme for 2012-13 is Feminism and Freedom. Professor Frances Hasso will be teaching a graduate/post-graduate seminar on Feminism and Freedom that will be offered in Fall 2012.
 
We are interested to understand how some of the major interventions of the 1970's--for example, feminist art and film practices, marxist and radical feminism, eco-feminism, lesbian separatism, human and civil rights discourse, cold war divisions and non-aligned movements, and postcolonial internationalism---continue to have an impact on feminist thought, offer important interventions into contemporary questions, or map the futures of feminism. Throughout the year we will engage the The Future of the Feminist 1970s with a variety of events, projects and courses.
 
 
The 2010-11 annual theme is Animals and the Question of Species and will revolve around three major points: new theoretical formulations in continental philosophy around the question of human exceptionalism; the human/animal boundary and connection, and the ethics, politics, and advocacy that flow from those; and the role of gender in developing a greater understanding of nonhuman animals.
 
 
As many may know, a discourse emerged in the mid-1970's that aimed to investigate the connection between feminism and earth and animals. These women called themselves Eco-Feminists and generated many ideas about the nature of women, the plight of animals, and the need for conservation. Due to a whole host of theoretical and practical conflicts, this project was never seriously embraced by academic feminists. Duke Women's Studies New Eco-feminism project hopes to revisit these questions, and develop theories and methodologies that will resonate within academic feminism today. We learned from E2T that there is a great need for further study of conservation, land use, and animal advocacy, not just from the perspective of science but from the humanities and interpretive sciences as well. We believe that contemporary feminist theory has much to offer such an engagement. Despite the fact that our eco-feminist foremothers may have been entrenched in essentialist ideology in their formulations, we believe their questions were the right ones. What can feminist thinking offer in response to the many global crises we face today including massive development, deforestation, animal torture, extinction, habitat loss, pollution, and global warming? 

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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Graduate Employment Opportunities

Independent Study and the Moxie Project

The Moxie Project is a selective one-year experience at Duke University that combines academic, professional and applied learning experiences to foster leadership development undergraduates. Over the year, students will participate in a Course on Women and Leadership, an eight week NYC Summer Internship, and a Fall Capstone Seminar.  The Moxie Project is supported by DukeEngage. More information is available on the Moxie Project website.

 
Each fellowship carries a nine-month ~ $21,580 stipend (tuition and fees to be paid by the Graduate School). Please note that only students in years one through six are eligible for health insurance. Beginning in year seven, students are responsible for providing their own health insurance.

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