Barriers & Opportunities

For businesses that want to compete in the global marketplace, the development of a culturally and internationally competent work force is fundamental to success. Business professionals increasingly seek out international experience as a key to professional development and advancement. The stakes are high, therefore, to ensure that global assignments are both readily available and successful. Yet women lag behind men in taking on international transfers, and the hurdles they face – “trailing” spouses, competing family and community responsibilities, inadequate training, challenging timetables and disadvantages on repatriation – are generally more numerous for women than for men. Through NCRW’s network, professionals and HR leaders are provided with the information they need to develop a business case for change as well as best practices for developing a more diversified talent pool.

Women Senior Management Appointments: CEW & Dun & Bradstreet Data: May 2012

A survey of Australian CEOs from Dun and Bradstreet and Chief Executive Women (CEW).

The data was collated from Dun and Bradstreet’s monthly Business Expectation Survey of 1,200 chief executive officers over a three-month period Q3-Q4 2011.The data reflects CEO’s answers to two key questions about women senior management
appointments.

The survey showed that:

• over 75 per cent of small firms did not intend to appoint a female to a senior management position in the next three months. Over 65 per cent of small to medium size firms were not mandating that female candidates be short listed for senior management roles.

• 22% of corporates said that in the last three months or next three months they have appointed or intend to appoint at least one female to a senior management position. This proportion is approximately the same across all industry groups.

URL: 
https://www.cew.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Media-Dun-Bradstreet-Survey-Data-Sept-Nov-2011-DunnBradstreetWomen-Senior-Management-Appointments.pdf

Marriage Structure and Resistance to the Gender Revolution in the Workplace

 In this article, we examine a heretofore neglected pocket of resistance to the gender revolution in the workplace: married male employees who have stay-at-home wives. We develop and empirically test the theoretical argument suggesting that such organizational members, compared to male employees in modern marriages, are more likely to exhibit attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors that are harmful to women in the workplace. To assess this hypothesis, we conducted four studies with a total of 718 married, male participants. We found that employed husbands in traditional marriages, compared to those in modern marriages, tend to (a) view the presence of women in the workplace unfavorably, (b) perceive that organizations with higher numbers of female employees are operating less smoothly, (c) find organizations with female leaders as relatively unattractive, and (d) deny, more frequently, qualified female employees opportunities for promotion.

URL: 
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2018259

Cultivating Fear: The Vulnerability of Immigrant Farmworkers in the US to Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment

This 95-page report describes rape, stalking, unwanted touching, exhibitionism, or vulgar and obscene language by supervisors, employers, and others in positions of power. Most farmworkers interviewed said they had experienced such treatment or knew others who had. And most said they had not reported these or other workplace abuses, fearing reprisals. Those who had filed sexual harassment claims or reported sexual assault to the police had done so with the encouragement and assistance of survivor advocates or attorneys in the face of difficult challenges.
MAY 16, 2012
READ THE REPORT
ISBN: 1-56432-886-4
URL: 
http://www.hrw.org/reports/2012/05/15/cultivating-fear

Harvey Nash CIO Survey 2012

The number of US women in Chief Information Officer (CIO) positions has decreased since 2010, according to a survey (PDF)  released by Harvey Nash USA this week.  In 2010, 12 percent of CIOs were women.  That number dropped to 11 percent in 2011 and is down to 9 percent this year.
 
The report finds that one third of US CIOs say that within their IT organizations there are no women in management level positions.  52% of US CIOs report that women are underrepresented in their IT organizations, according to the survey.
 
(from the FMF news feed)
URL: 
http://media.harveynash.com/usa/mediacenter/2012_US_CIO_Survey.pdf

Expanding Work-Life Perspectives: Talent Management in Asia

Despite increased interest, the topic of work-life effectiveness in Asia has remained relatively under-explored in the research literature, especially in terms of how to best implement work-life practices in different cultural contexts and within specific local economies.
 
Expanding Work-Life Perspectives: Talent Management in Asia contributes to our knowledge of how organizations can best implement work-life programs in the region by focusing on the experiences of 1,834 high-potential employees working in Asia for U.S.- or European-based multinational organizations.
URL: 
http://catalyst.org/publication/530/expanding-work-life-perspectives-talent-management-in-asia
Member Organization: 

Breaking the Social Security Glass Ceiling

The National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare Foundation , the National Organization for Women Foundation and the Institute for Women's Policy Research briefed Congressional staff today on their research examining the challenges facing America 's elderly women and their families. Their report, Breaking the Social Security Glass Ceiling also proposes initiatives to ensure Social Security benefits are adequate for all Americans, particularly for women and women of color.
 
Here are just some of the recommendations in this groundbreaking report:

Women and the Risk of Disability Research: Insights from a Landmark Study by The State Farm® Center for Women and Financial Services at The American College

The majority of Americans lack basic knowledge about the likelihood of a disability and are unprepared to handle this kind of life-changing event. These gaps put families and financial futures in jeopardy, according to a new study released today by The State Farm® Center for Women and Financial Services at The American College.

URL: 
http://womenscenter.theamericancollege.edu/uploads/documents/Women-and-the-Risk-of-Disability-Study-5-4-12-v1a.pdf
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