Culture & Identity

Sexism still permeates culture through the pervasiveness of gender stereotypes as well as misogynistic, negative and violent imagery in mass media. Perceptions of identity and gender roles are influenced, reflected and reinforced through myths, narratives and stories. Cultural cues about appropriate gender roles can have a negative and harmful impact by, for example, defining strength and rationalism as ”masculine” and submissiveness and emotionalism as ”feminine.” NCRW and its members are promoting awareness through research and critical analysis that uncover the tensions and assumptions involved in identity and gender roles.

Center for Research and Education on Gender and Sexuality

Our Mission: To produce and disseminate knowledge and resources that address the impact of gender on health and well-being, promote healthy sexuality, and reduce sexual and reproductive health disparities.
 
RESEARCH: We perform rigorous, innovative research with diverse populations, link findings to practice, and evaluate the impact of evidence-based interventions.
 
EDUCATION: We offer advanced educational opportunities for undergraduate- and graduate-level students and work to implement evidence-based curricula.
 
TRAINING: We provide cutting-edge continuing education and professional development programs for educators, healthcare providers, and paraprofessionals.
 
POLICY: We link research to best practices and disseminate findings to policymakers to promote healthy sexuality.

Contact

835 Market Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
Ph. (415) 817-4525

http://cregs.sfsu.edu/



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Principal Staff

Dr. Colleen Hoff, Director
E-mail: choff@sfsu.edu

Dr. Andreana Clay, Research Faculty

Dr. Jessica Fields, Research Faculty
E-mail: jfields@sfsu.edu

Dr. Anu Manchikanti, Research Faculty

Dr. Alexis Martinez, Research Faculty

Dr. Rita Melendez, Research Faculty
E-mail: rmelende@sfsu.edu
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Employment Opportunities

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Summer Institute on Sexuality

Research Projects

Researchers at CREGS conduct projects examining a wide range of subjects, including sexual health, gender equality, health disparities and HIV prevention. The impact of CREGS’ work is far reaching. Our researchers consistently garner professional recognition and our work has contributed significantly to the national and international sexual research agenda.

Gender & Sexuality Seminar Series


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Reports & Resources

Click here for all articles.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

 
Our student internship opportunities offer academic credit for SFSU students, and position availability depends on the semester. Graduate and undergraduate students from San Francisco State University interested in involvement with CREGS should contact the Principle Investigator of the specific study the student is interested in. Visit our research projects page for a list of current CREGS research faculty and projects.
 
Volunteer Opportunities
 
CREGS is always looking for help from people interested in contributing to our work. Volunteers are always welcome. If you have an idea how you would like to work with us, feel free to send us an email.
 
 
The Center for Research and Education on Gender and Sexuality (CREGS) is seeking thoughtful, provocative articles to feature on the front page of the CREGS website. CREGS is dedicated to producing knowledge and resources that address the impact gender on health and well-being, promote healthy sexuality, and reduce sexual and reproductive health disparities.

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Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
33° 44' 56.382" N, 84° 23' 16.7352" W
Member Organizations: 

Beverly Guy Sheftall, Ph.D., is the founding director of the Women's Research and Resource Center and the Anna Julia Cooper Professor of Women's Studies at Spelman College.  She is also adjunct professor at Emory University's Institute for Women's Studies where she teaches graduate courses. At the age of sixteen, she entered Spelman College where she majored in English and minored in secondary education.  After graduation with honors, she attended Wellesley College for a fifth year of study in English.  In 1968, she entered Atlanta to pursue a master's degree in English; her thesis was entitled, "Faulkner's Treatment of Women in His Major Novels."  A year later she began her first teaching job in the Department of English at Alabama State University in Montgomery, Alabama.

Location

Atlanta, GA
United States
33° 44' 56.382" N, 84° 23' 16.7352" W

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WOMEN’S EQUALITY DAY: A Little Less Conversation, A Little More Action

By Karen O’Connor*

One need only look to the Declaration of Sentiments adopted by the women in attendance at the Seneca Falls Convention in August 1848 to begin to appreciate how far women in the United States still are from reaching equality in a host of arenas, many of which are dependent on political or legal equality. Although women were granted the franchise in 1920 after decades of struggle, it is only in the past few decades that women have become a political force – at least at the ballot box. Women not only vote more than men, but unmarried women and women of color are much more likely to vote for Democratic candidates. In fact, women were key voters in the successful elections of Presidents Clinton and Obama.


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WOMEN’S EQUALITY FORUM: Achieving Political Equality by Living It

By Tonni Brodber*

Linda Basch: From your perspective, what is the unfinished work of women’s political equality?

Tonni Brodber: In the English-speaking Caribbean women’s participation in political leadership ranges from a high of 13% in Jamaica to a low of 0% in Belize, with many countries like St. Kitts and Nevis and St Lucia hovering at 6.7% and at 5.6% respectively. In the face of such paltry numbers, it almost pains me to say that it is my belief that the unfuinished work of women’s political equality is the lack of quality and diversity.


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WOMEN’S EQUALITY FORUM: Steps to Political Equality from Gloria Thomas

By Gloria Thomas*

Women will not have achieved political equality until critical societal changes have taken place. First, women’s successes in being elected and appointed to political positions, corporate and non-profit executive leadership roles, as well as significant public and private boards must no longer be an anomaly to demonstrate equality has been accomplished. When we reach this point, there will no longer be a need for organizations like The White House Project to inspire women to run for public office. Nor will there be a need for other leadership programs designed to provide women with the skills and networks necessary to pursue various executive level positions and to provide the staying power to succeed once they are in these roles.


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Consortium on Race, Gender, and Ethnicity

The Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity (CRGE) at the University of Maryland is an interdisciplinary research center which promotes intersectional scholarship through original research, mentoring, and collaboration. CRGE's work explores the intersections of race, gender, ethnicity and other dimensions of inequality as they shape the construction and representation of identities, behavior and complex social relations.

Contact

1208 Cole Field House
College Park, MD 20742
Ph. (301) 405-2931
Fx. (301) 405-2868
http://www.crge.umd.edu
btdill@umd.edu
rzambran@umd.edu

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Principal Staff

Ruth E. Zambrana, Ph.D., Director
E-mail: rzambran@umd.edu

Laura A. Logie, Ph.D., Assistant Director
E-mail: lauraalogie@hotmail.com

Bonnie Thornton Dill, Ph.D., Founding Director, CRGE
E-mail: btdill@umd.edu

Wendy Hall, Program Management Specialist
E-mail: hallw@umd.edu

Beth Douthirt-Cohen, Communications Coordinator
E-mail: bdc1@umd.edu
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Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

Developing Research Studies include:

 
Limited research has been conducted on CVD risk factors and effective interventions among Latinos of Central and South American origin (CSA). Specific aims of this study are to: (1) assess health behaviors, social and psychosocial CVD risk factors among adult Central/South American men and women; (2) examine the associations between psychosocial, social and health behavior cardiovascular risk factors with clinical measurements among adult CSA men and women; and (3) conduct a pilot study with lay health promoters to test the effectiveness of literacy and linguistic appropriate health education using the Model for Improvement to improve CVD risk profiles among CSA adults. A cross-sectional health interview and examination survey of 400 CSA 30-64 year old adults residing in Montgomery County MD will be conducted, followed by an intervention with 30 lay community health promoters. The intervention includes 14 contact points; pre- and post-test instruments will measure effectiveness of the intervention.

Does Stress “Get Under the Skin” Differently By Social Status? Identifying Essential Bio-Social Pathways for Cardiovascular Disease Morbidity
 
 
Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) is the major cause of death in the United States and racial/ethnic minorities have high incidence and prevalence rates compared to other groups in the population. According to the American Heart Association (2009), most recent prevalence rates for CVD were highest for blacks (45%) compared to Whites (33%) and Hispanics make up the largest ethnic group with increasing rates (32%) relative to their representation in the population. Although studies have documented population differences in CVD, the underlying biological and social risk factors that work concomitantly to account for these differences are not well researched or understood. Using secondary data from the 2006 health and Retirement Study Core Data File and Biomarker Supplement, we will examine the association between social status, SES, psycho-social adversities, biomarkers of disease, health status and health behaviors to assess their relationship(s) to CVD morbidity. Our main analytic interest in examining these relationships is to identify essential bio-social pathways of disease vulnerability, the mechanisms that mediate or moderate those relationships and the risk factors that place marginalized minorities (Blacks and Hispanics) at a disadvantage for CVD morbidity at older (50+yrs) rather than younger ages (<25yrs). This project is innovative since it is one of the very few studies to examine how social risk factors “get under the skin” differently for status groups in efforts to identify the important distal mechanisms involved that disproportionately increase VCD risk f or Blacks and Hispanics. Implications and outcomes of the study are aimed to help clinicians and health policy makers reduce disparities and increase cardiovascular risk prevention strategies to improve population health.

Stress for Success: The Impact of Occupational Stressors on the African American & Latino Professoriate
 
Occupational stress manifests itself in stress-related disorders (physical, mental), poor work performance, reduced productivity and retention of qualified employees in the workforce. This project investigates the relationships between occupational stressors, organizational factors, and moderators to explain variation in the physical and mental health of under-represented minority (URM) men and women faculty. Mixed methods are proposed to test the central hypothesis- URM women faculty will report a higher reported number of physical and mental health conditions than URM men. Data is collected from four sources; 1) survey, 2) focus groups, 3) in-depth interviews, and, 4) review of Curriculum Vitae. The sample will consist of 300 (150 males & 150 females) URM tenure track assistant or tenured associate professors in Research I and II institutions. These data will serve as the baseline for a larger longitudinal study to assess career path and progression over a three year follow-up time period.

Childhood Origins of Health Disparities in Young Adulthood
 
 
The primary objective in the proposed application is to determine the independent and interacting influences of gender, race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status (SES) at the family and community level on overweight and health among adolescents and young adults. Our central hypothesis is that social/cultural factors (e.g. preferences and norms) and structural factors (e.g. differential access to resources) interact to explain the disparities in weight status observed across racial/ethnic groups. Our collective experience in research on Hispanic, African American, Asian, and majority health, childhood obesity, the analysis of health outcomes, and our experience with management and analysis of large datasets make us uniquely qualified to conduct this research project.

Differences in Risk Factors by Hypertension Status Among Postmenopausal African American and Latino Women
 
The goal of this study is to investigate how various risk factors, socioeconomic status (SES), psychosocial, and access related factors, mediated by health behaviors and medical history, can increase our understanding of race/ethnic and gender differences in hypertension status (normotensive vs. hypertensive; treated vs. untreated; controlled vs. uncontrolled) and transitions in hypertension status for African American and Latino women ages 50 to79 years. Using secondary data analyses of the Women's' Health Initiative (WHI) for the African American (n=14,618) and Latino (n=6484) subsamples of the Observational Study (OS), Clinical Trials and Extended Study (2005-2010), we will address the risk factors that place racial/ethnic women at risk for critical levels of hypertension. Our main analytic interest in comparing hypertension status at baseline and transitions of hypertension status in subsequent years is to capture how risk factors can accumulate and exacerbate health conditions over time. Specifically, this study 1) examines the association between SES, psychosocial, and access factors with hypertension status (normotensive vs. hypertensive) and transitions in status and tests whether the associations are mediated by medical history and health behaviors among African American and Latino women, 2) assesses the underlying factors contributing to differences in two indicators of hypertension status a) treated vs. untreated hypertensives and b) controlled vs. uncontrolled hypertension status and transitions in status among African American and Latino women that have been identified as having hypertension, and 3) examines the relationship between access to care and geographic availability for health care services and hypertension status (normotensive vs. hypertensive and treated vs. untreated) and transitions in status for African American and Latino women. Of significance, assessing hypertension endpoints over time periods will allow a longitudinal assessment of the effects of SES on hypertension status. More importantly, the patterns of outcomes of the study will illuminate our understanding of the underlying factors that contribute to disparities in hypertension status for racial/ethnic women. This project is innovative since it is one of the very few studies to examine incidence and prevalence of hypertension status by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status using longitudinal data in efforts to help clinicians and health policy makers reduce disparities and increase cardiovascular risk prevention strategies to improve population health.

Past Research Program Areas:

Intersections, Identities, and Inequalities (Dr. Bonnie Thornton Dill, director)

This program area focuses on the development of theoretical, methodological and pedagogical approaches to the study of intersections of race, gender, class, ethnicity and other dimensions of inequality. It is an interdisciplinary research program area that seeks to elaborate how dimensions of inequality intersect, creating new and distinct social formations. This includes promoting research that contextualizes the lives and experiences of individuals and groups, as well as develops applications of knowledge to human problems. This scholarship embraces a wide range of approaches that permit complex and nuanced explorations. Intersectional analysis is also an effort to move beyond binary or oppositional analyses and toward an understanding of the ways the ideological, political, and economic systems of power construct and reconstruct one another. An intersectional approach, grounded in lived experience, provides the intellectual foundation for the pursuit of social justice.

Health and Social Well Being of Low Income Women, Children, and Families (Dr. Ruth E. Zambrana, director)

This program area seeks to build a more comprehensive and ethnic-specific scientific knowledge base on the effects of the intersection of poverty, institutional barriers, and other non-medical factors that contribute to adverse health status. This approach takes into account the influence of race, gender, and ethnicity to promote responsiveness in the development of future health interventions.

Material Culture/Visual Culture (Drs. Mary Corbin Sies and Angel David Nieves, co-directors)

The Material Culture/Visual Culture (MC/VC) program area is engaged in research on African American material and visual culture, and more generally on the material and visual culture of marginalized subgroups of North America. The group seeks to publicize the value of material and visual evidence for understanding the cultures of everyday life of American subcultures and to foster an environment in which scholars from different backgrounds can explore and refine research and theories for working with material and visual culture.

Schooling, Ethnic Communities and International Perspectives. (Dr. Lory J. Dance, director).

This Research Program Area is in the early stages of development. Led by sociologist Dr. Lory J. Dance, this area focuses on the uses of qualitative methodologies in the study of education in ethnic communities in the United States and internationally. The group also houses the Qualitative Research Interest Group (QRIG; co-directed by Drs. Lory J. Dance and Annette Lareau), which sponsored a colloquium series in fall 2005 on funding qualitative research projects.

Other Activities:

Intersectional Research Database. CRGE is home to the world's first online database devoted exclusively to intersectional research. The Intersectional Research Database (IRD), which was launched in summer 2005, currently features over 100 annotations of articles and books on intersectional issues. The IRD is updated weekly and will soon include audio, visual images, video and sound.

CRGE Graduate Colloquium. CRGE holds a monthly colloquium for graduate students that focuses on various topics related to intersectionality and social justice. Graduate students from across the disciplines participate through attendance and by sharing their own work at the end of each semester. Recent colloquium topics have dealt with the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina; interdisciplinary job talks; intersections and sexualities; and the commodification of Black youth, which was led by Dr. Patricia Hill Collins.

Research Interest Groups (RIGS). RIGS are smaller research groups, each sponsored by a Research Program Area. RIGS are collaborative, interdisciplinary groups that conduct intersectional research. The RIGS aim to create groups that can assist their members in preparing and submitting proposals for federal, state, and private sector research grants in CRGE Research Program Areas.


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Reports & Resources

 Click here for all publications.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

CRISP Scholars

CRGE Interdisciplinary Scholars Program (CRISP) provides scholars with an opportunity to learn firsthand the processes of research, publication, and administration through a mentoring relationship with CRGE faculty. The focus of this exceptional program is two-fold: rigorous training and dedicated mentoring. CrISP scholars are first- and second-year incoming graduate students from departments affiliated with CRGE.


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Institute for Research on Women and Gender

The Institute for Research on Women and Gender fosters collaboration and further the research of all U-M faculty members and graduate students who use the lens of women and gender to pursue their studies.
 
IRWG provides direct research funding and valuable expertise to those seeking external funding.
 
IRWG sponsors a wide variety of lectures, symposia, and other forums geared to faculty and students in all disciplines, at all levels. Many of our free programs appeal to the general public.
 
IRWG enables faculty members to design their own multidisciplinary, multiyear programs that examine significant issues related to women and gender.

Contact

204 South State Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1290
Ph. (734) 764-9537
Fx. (734) 764-9533
http://www.umich.edu/~irwg/
irwg@umich.edu


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Principal Staff

Sarah Fenstermaker, Director
E-mail: umsarah@umich.edu

Deborah Keller-Cohen, Senior Associate Director
E-mail: dkc@umich.edu

Hannah Rosen, Interim Associate Director
E-mail: hrosen@umich.edu

Debra M. Schwartz, Senior Public Relations Representative
E-mail: schwarde@umich.edu

Terrence W. Crimes, Business Administrator
E-mail: tcrimes@umich.edu

Lisa Parker, Contract and Grant Administrator
E-mail: wooliver@umich.edu
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Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

IRWG supports original, faculty-led programs that reach across the university, each one linking several U-M departments, interdisciplinary programs, or professional schools in a focused examination of a particular area or topic related to women and gender. IRWG Faculty Programs are usually funded for a two-year period, but some are long-standing.
 
IRWG welcomes program proposals that explore differences and commonalities among and between women and men in the multicultural United States and internationally. Typical programs involve a series of public events, workshops, and other creative activities that might inform a future research project or result in a publication or performance. Funding for as much as $10,000 is available for approved programs.

Click here for a list of Current Faculty Programs.

Click here for a list of Past Faculty Programs.


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Reports & Resources

Adolescents and Girls

Children's Time with Fathers in Intact Families, Pamela Davis-Kearn.

Gender, Puberty, and Objectification, Karin Martin.

Arts

Tharp, Feminism, and Postmodern Dance, Sally Banes.

Art/Girl: Graffiti, Femininity, and the Career of Lady Pink, Kristina Milnor.

No Place for a Woman? Critical Narratives and Erotic Graffiti from Pompeii, Kristina Milnor.

Family Stories/Family Pictures: Mothers With Cameras, Joanne Leonard.

Representation of Women in Art History: An Overview, Patricia Simons.

Censorship

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in Law, Abigail Carter.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in Sociology, Susannah Dolance.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in Literature, Leslie Dorfman Davis.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in Feminist Theory and Philosophy, Troy Gordon.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in Education, Edwina Hansbrough.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in the Mass Media, Edwina Hansbrough.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in Psychology, Zaje Harrell.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in Visual and Performing Arts, Libby Otto.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in Economics, Lucie Schmidt.

Studies in Gender Based Censorship: An Annotated Bibliography in American History, Chris Talbot.

Feminist Thought and Scholarship

Objectification Theory: Emotional Consequences of Sexual, Barbara Fredrickson.

Feminist Foundations: Practicing Feminism in the Community. A transcript of a panel at the conference, Feminists at Work: Multicultural, Feminist Influences on Practice, sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Program in Feminist Practice, The University of Michigan, October 16-17, 1998.

Giving It Up: Disrupting White 'Innocence,' Re-Educating White Feminism, Gail Griffin.

International Issues - Religion

The Home and Garden are a Small Paradise for Women: Men and Women Gendering Bosnjak Nationalism in Muslim Bosnia-Hercegovina, Elissa Helms (1997).

Health and Health Care

Dual Autobiography and AIDS Witnessing, Ross Chambers.

Improving Pregnancy Outcomes during Imprisonment

Initial Exposure to Nicotine in College-age Women smokers and Never-smokers, Cynthia Pomerlau.

Mental Illness and Substance abuse: Implications for Women's Health and Health Care Access, Beth Glover Reed and Carol Mowbray.

Representations of Women's Bodies and Birthing, Carolyn Sampselle.

Women and Stress, Elizabeth Young.

Mental Health

Rumination and Depression in Women, Susan Nolen-Hoeksema.

Serious Mental Illness: Women and Parenting, Carol Mowbray.

History

Telling An Untellable Story: White "Daughter" Black "Mother" After the Cuban Revolution, Ruth Behar.

Prison Discipline, Reform and Debate: Negotiating the Female Prisoner in Nineteenth-Century England, Susanna Calkins.

The Figure of the Adulteress in the Construction of the "Cult of True Womanhood" in the19th-Century American Moral Reform Literature, Lisa Cochran.

Remembering a Forgotten Past, or Why Have We Only Heard of Ballerinas, Lynn Garafola.

The Pasha's Prostitutes: Rethinking Women, the State, and Female Prostitution in Nineteenth Century Egypt, Mario Ruiz.

International Issues - Prostitution

Making A Spectacle: The Nightly Transformations of Egyptian Nightclub Performers in a Conservative Age, Katherine Zirbel.

Contraband Women, Immigration Tricks of the Sex Trade, and State Visions of Migrant Women Workers' Rights? The 1997 Toronto Massage Parlour Raids, Cheryl Harrison.

Politics

Institutional Gender Analysis: Running for the Russian Duma, Janet Johnson.

Visions of Citizenship: Questioning the Liberal Promise of Equality, Elizabeth Wingrove.

Reproductive Rights

Informed Consent Issues in Assisted Reproduction, Nancy Reame.

Recent Trends in Abortion Legislation in Central Europe, Eleonora Zielinska.

Rural Women - International Issues

The (Wo)man in the Cashew: Gender and Development in Rural Belize, Melissa Johnson.

Sexuality

Images of Fashion: Constructing the Visible Body, Olga Vainshtein.

Sports and Fitness

Your Hair is Caked, Your Limbs are Sore: Gender, "Roughing It," and Class in Early Yosemite Tourism, Stephanie Palmer.

Violence Against Women

Assessing Sexual Harassment among Latinas, Lilia Cortina.

Domestic Violence Against Women in Serbia, Zorica Mrsevic.

Offender Interventions to End Violence Against Women, Daniel Saunders.

Women of Color

Dis/Arming the Black Champ: Joe Louis and the Legacy of Racial Uplift in the Post-Civil Rights Movement, Marlon Ross.

Violence

Seng, Julia, and Mickey Sperlich. 2008. Survivor Moms: Women’s Stories of Birthing, Mothering, and Healing after Sexual Abuse.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

 
IRWG’s Faculty Seed Grant program was established in 1996. It enhances scholarship on women and gender at U-M by supporting disciplinary and interdisciplinary faculty projects. Support may be requested for individual activities, such as research assistance, research-related travel, or research materials--including books, microfilms, or similar items. Faculty Seed Grants also support collaborative projects, such as pilot studies or initial research efforts, study groups, or conference planning and implementation. Awards range from $500 to $10,000. The following criteria play some role in the award process:
 
 
In October, 2006, IRWG joined with the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts to launch the Sisters Fund, an innovative program to support vital projects that address global health issues related to women and gender. The idea for the fund came from women faculty and administrators, and in its early phase the fund was primarily supported by women—a first at U-M. Grants, varying in size from $500 to $10,000, are awarded to U-M faculty members engaged in scholarship or other creative activities that benefit local and global communities experiencing gender-based health disparities. We welcome applications from all academic disciplines, including the arts, humanities, and sciences. The Sisters Fund awards as many as two grants annually.
 
IRWG/Rackham Graduate Student Research Awards

The IRWG/Rackham Graduate Student Research Awards program provides $500 grants to U-M graduate students who are planning or conducting research, scholarship, and creative activities focusing on women and gender. These grants are for expenses such as books, travel, production or exhibition costs, software, data collection, or payment of subjects. Students at any stage in their graduate careers may apply. Although most awards are made to doctoral-level students, students currently in master’s degree programs, but planning research or creative careers, are invited to apply.

Boyd/Williams Fellowship for Research on Women & Work

The Boyd/Williams fellowship is awarded annually to a U-M doctoral student writing a dissertation related to women and work. Successful proposals promote knowledge and enhance understanding of the complexities of women’s roles in relation to their paid and unpaid labor (e.g. philanthropy, volunteerism, community involvement, domestic work, and political activity). The fellowship provides funding in the amount of $2,000.

IRWG/Rackham Community of Scholars

The Community of Scholars (COS) is a four-month summer fellowship program. It is intended to support U-M graduate students who are engaged in research, scholarship, or other creative activities that focus on women and/or gender.

 
The purpose of the IRWG Senior Scholar Visitor program  is to bring accomplished senior faculty presently employed in academic institutions outside the University of Michigan to  IRWG for up to a year  to engage in research that advances our understanding of women/gender and/or sexuality. Visiting Senior Scholars are expected to offer a public lecture, hold one master class meeting with dissertation students and participate in the intellectual environment of the institute. In selection decisions we consider the applicant's field of interest, scholarly achievement, plan of research, and fit with the institute’s current interests and intellectual community. Scholars from the United States and abroad who hold a PhD, as well as creative artists with a terminal degree in their field, are encouraged to apply. In addition to office space, IRWG will provide a $5000 stipend per term and $1000 for research/ professional expenses.

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Consortium for Women and Research

The Consortium for Women and Research is dedicated to the support of research by and on women and on gender in its multiple intersections with race, class, sexual identity, and other categories of identity and analysis. The Consortium expresses this support through:
  • Research and Travel Awards
  • Fostering interdisciplinary dialogue among scholars and activists, 
    off campus communities and policy makers
  • Recognizing and rewarding accomplishments in mentoring
  • Advocating support for women's professional advancement in the 
    University
  • Contributing to community and mentoring among women scholars 
    on campus

Contact

One Shields Avenue
Davis, CA 95616
Ph. 530-754-8852
Fx. 530-754-8853
http://cwr.ucdavis.edu/
consortiumforwomen@ucdavis.edu


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Principal Staff

Laura Grindstaff, Director
Ph. (530) 754-8852
E-mail: lagrindstaff@ucdavis.edu

Beverly Babcock, Program Coordinator
Ph. (530) 754-8851
E-mail: bababcock@ucdavis.edu
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

 
The Consortium for Women and Research brings top-ranking women scientists to campus to discuss their research and to meet with faculty and graduate students for a lively and thoughtful conversation about the issues that women scientists face and the best strategies for dealing with them.
 
 
 
Chaotic Cabal
Susan-Jane Harrison, Dramatic Arts
Jarrell Chua, Dramatic Arts

Cross-Cultural Women's and Gender History Program
Victoria Langland, History

Gender and Militarization
Hilary Berwick, Cultural Studies

Language Revitalization
Martha Maci, Native American Studies

Uneasy Remains
Gina Caison, English


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Visiting Scholars Program

The Consortium for Women and Research is pleased to announce the continuation of its Visiting Scholars Program. Each year we provide a small group of competitively selected domestic and international scholars with university affiliation, library privileges, shared office space (when possible), computer/internet access, and the opportunity to participate in the Consortium’s events.

Graduate Student Travel Awards
Provides funds to graduate students in any field for travel to professional conferences, workshops, or professional events for the purpose of presenting their own research or creative work and for engaging in networking plan of their own construction. Historically, the Consortium has given preference to students in the areas of research for which funding is not easily available. It has also funded students in areas in which women are distinctly under represented.
Travel Awards are to be used for travel from December 15, 2012 through June 30, 2013. Awards limited to $500 domestic and $800 international travel.

First-Year Post-Doctoral Travel Award
These awards provide funding to women in their first year of post-doctoral study in any of the STEM disciplines for travel to professional meetings for the purpose of presenting their
PhD research and implementing a networking plan of their own construction. The consortium gives priority to proposals from scholars whose research focuses on gender and/or who are in STEM fields in which women are distinctly underrepresented. 

Outstanding Mentor Awards
Honor Academic Senate and Academic Federation members for mentoring women post-docs and graduate students in research and professional development. They include $500 towards research support.

Graduate Research Awards (GRA)
Funds graduate student research and creative work up to $1,000 in three areas:
- Research about women and gender in its multiple intersections with race, class, sexual and national identity.
- Research that focuses on or leads to the improvement of the lives of girls or women.
- Research in the natural and physical sciences or engineering that advances the Consortium's goals.

Research Interest Group Awards
Research Interest Groups are groups of faculty, graduate students, and postdocs who are engaged in collaborative, interdisciplinary research projects by and about women and/or gender in its intersections with race, class, sexual and national identity, and the like. Provides funds to sponsor Research Interest Groups in order to facilitate collaborative, cross-disciplinary research and inquiry by and about women and about gender in its multiple intersections with race, class, sexual and national identity, create opportunities for cross-disciplinary discussion among scholars, create support groups that assist RIG members in preparing and submitting grant proposals, and build better connections between scholars, policy makers,activists and/or local communities.


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