Culture & Identity

Sexism still permeates culture through the pervasiveness of gender stereotypes as well as misogynistic, negative and violent imagery in mass media. Perceptions of identity and gender roles are influenced, reflected and reinforced through myths, narratives and stories. Cultural cues about appropriate gender roles can have a negative and harmful impact by, for example, defining strength and rationalism as ”masculine” and submissiveness and emotionalism as ”feminine.” NCRW and its members are promoting awareness through research and critical analysis that uncover the tensions and assumptions involved in identity and gender roles.

Institute for Research on Women

At the forefront of feminist research for over thirty years, the Institute for Research on Women (IRW) advances cutting-edge, interdisciplinary scholarship on gender, sexuality and women. Part of the School of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, the IRW was founded in 1977 by faculty and administrators seeking to expand feminist scholarship and activism beyond the university’s fledgling Women’s Studies program. Today, the IRW supports a broad range of programming designed to stimulate research on gender, sexuality and women within and across the disciplines, throughout and beyond Rutgers. Promoting faculty and student connections and building intellectual community are also central to the IRW’s mission.

Contact

160 Ryders Lane
New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8555
Ph. (732) 932-9072
Fx. (732) 932-0861
http://irw.rutgers.edu/
irw@rci.rutgers.edu


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Principal Staff

Yolanda Martínez-San Miguel, Ph.D., Director

Sarah Tobias, Ph.D., Associate Director
E-mail: stobias@rci.rutgers.edu

Marlene Importico, Program Coordinator
E-mail: importic@rci.rutgers.edu

Yomaira Figueroa, IRW Learning Community Coordinator
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The IRW fosters feminist research at Rutgers through creative programming tied to an annual theme. The weekly Faculty/Graduate Seminar brings together faculty and advanced graduate students from a broad range of disciplines and from all three Rutgers campuses. Participants present works-in-progress, addressing the IRW’s annual theme from a range of disciplinary and methodological perspectives. The Distinguished Lecture Series presents innovative research by prominent feminist scholars and activists from Rutgers and other universities, exploring the annual theme in depth. The Undergraduate Learning Community extends the strengths of the IRW’s programs and research community to advanced undergraduate students who attend the IRW’s lecture series, develop research projects related to the annual theme, and work with IRW seminar fellows as mentors. Recent annual themes have included The Culture of Rights/The Rights of Culture (2008-9), Gendered Agency (2009-10) and The Art & Science of Happiness (2010-11).
 
In addition to its thematic programming, the IRW regularly organizes a one-to-three day Spring Colloquium addressing emergent debates in feminist activism and scholarship. Previous topics include the intersections of labor, class and sexuality; immigrant women’s collective organizing and the tensions between gender and disability studies.
 
Other regular programs include a workshop on Negotiating Basics for Women Entering the Academic Job Market, featuring women faculty of different ranks from the sciences, social sciences and humanities, and a Graduate Student Forum on Feminist Scholarship, enabling graduate students to share and receive feedback on their research.

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Reports & Resources

Books

Gender and Culture at the Limits of Rights, edited by Dorothy L. Hodgson (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011), explores the concept of "women's rights as human rights” and the way in which a rights-based analysis can promote or limit the attainment of gender justice. Most of the essays in the volume were originally presented as part of the 2008-9 IRW seminar and its accompanying spring colloquium.

No Permanent Waves: Recasting Histories of U.S. Feminism, edited by Nancy Hewitt (Rutgers University Press, 2010) showcases a group of papers that were first presented at an IRW colloquium. The contributors "address issues of race, class and sexuality within histories of women's rights and feminism as well as the cultural and intellectual currents and social and political priorities that marked movements for women's advancement and liberation. The concept of waves surging and receding cannot fully capture these multiple and overlapping movements, chronologies, issues, and sites."

The papers collected in The Sex of Class: Women Transforming American Labor, edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble (Cornell University Press, 2007), examines the role sex plays in the workforce, as well as contemporary and historical domestic and global labor movements. 

The Journal of International Labor and Working-Class History issued a special edition on “Working-Class Subjectivities and Sexualities” in Spring 2006. Edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble and Victoria Hattam, several of the articles in this volume were first presented as papers at spring colloquium organized by the IRW and ILWCH in 2004. 

Gendering Disability, edited by Bonnie G. Smith and Beth Hutchison (Rutgers University Press, 2004), collects work presented at a three-day IRW conference that brought together gender studies and disabilities studies scholars.

Feminist Locations: Local and Global, Theory and Practice edited by Marianne DeKoven (Rutgers University Press, 2001), is based on scholarship presented at the IRW from 1995 to 1998.

Transitions, Environments, Translations: Feminisms in International Politics edited by Joan W. Scott, Cora Kaplan, and Debra Keates (Routledge, 1997), from work presented at a conference jointly presented by the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton and the IRW.

With the Women's Rights Litigation Clinic at Rutgers Law School-Newark, the IRW co-sponsored The Project on Reproductive Rights Laws for the 1990s which culminated in the 1989 Rutgers University Press volume Reproductive Laws for the 1990s, co-edited by Sherrill Cohen and Nadine Taub.

Describing the impetus for Changing Our Own Words: Essays on Criticism, Theory and Writing By Black Women (Rugters University Press, 1989), Board of Governors Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English Cheryl Wall writes, “I took the idea for a one-day conference to then-IRW director Carol Smith, who embraced it enthusiastically. The conference on October 22-23, 1987, was one of the most gratifying experiences of my career. The room for the symposium was filled with many of the most brilliant scholars and writers of my generation. The book became one of the foundational texts in black feminist criticism. I will forever be grateful for the support of the IRW.”

Women, Households, and the Economy, edited by Lourdes Beneria and Catharine R. Stimpson (Rutgers University Press, 1987), collects papers presented at a two-day conference stemming from a grant from the Russell Sage Foundation “to bring together a group of scholars on the cutting edge of the thinking about women and the economy.”

Working Papers

Revised and condensed versions of work presented at our weekly seminar have been published in four volumes. Copies are available on request from the IRW. 
 
Femininities, Masculinities, and The Politics of Sexual Difference(s): Working Papers from the 2003-2004 Seminar, edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble, Beth Hutchison and Amanda B. Chaloupka
 
Reconfiguring Class and Gender: Working Papers from the 2002-2003 Seminar, edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble, Amanda B. Chaloupka, and Beth Hutchison
 
Modes of Knowledge and Action: Working Papers from the Women in the Public Sphere Seminar 1998-1999, edited by Beth Hutchison
 

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Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

 Visiting Global Scholars

As part of its commitment to foster feminist research at Rutgers and beyond, the IRW hosts feminist researchers from around the world as visiting global scholars. Visiting global scholars are able to pursue their own research and writing in a supportive environment and access Rutgers’ unique feminist resources. They also participate in the IRW seminar, present public lectures to the university community and speak in classes and community forums.


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Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

The mission of the Radcliffe Institute is to create an academic community where individuals can pursue advanced work in any of the academic disciplines, professions, or creative arts. Within that broad purpose, it sustains a continuing commitment to the study of women, gender, and society.

Contact

10 Garden Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Ph. (617) 495-8601
Fx. (617) 496-4640
http://www.radcliffe.edu
info@radcliffe.edu


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Principal Staff

Lizabeth Cohen, Dean

Nancy F. Cott, Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Director of the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America

Marilyn Dunn, Executive Director of the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America

Jeanne Follansbee, Academic Dean of the Radcliffe Institute

Matthew E. Kernkraut, Associate Dean for External Relations

Nisha Mongia, Administrative Dean of the Radcliffe Institute

Susan S. Pintus, Associate Dean of Finance

Judith Vichniac, Associate Dean of the Fellowship Program

Rebecca E. F. Wassarman, Director of Academic Ventures
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The Schlesinger Library

A repository of 80,000 volumes and 13,000 linear feet of manuscripts, Schlesinger is the preeminent library documenting the history of women in America. Its holdings include letters, diaries, and personal papers of women and families. The library also houses records of women's organizations, books about women, culinary history, women's periodicals, photographs, videotapes, and oral histories. Prominent collections include the papers of Amelia Earhart, Betty Friedan, and others. The library also administers research grants and sponsors exhibitions and other public programs.

Henry A. Murray Research Center

A singularly valuable archive of longitudinal social science data, the Center serves as a resource for research on the changing lives of American women. The Center's primary purpose is to promote the use of existing social science data to further explore human development and change. A national archive of more than 270 studies is available to researchers from all levels and disciplines, free of charge. The center also sponsors conferences and workshops on methodological and substantive issues.

Academic Engagement Programs

As part of its mission to create an academic community where individuals can pursue advanced work, Radcliffe sponsors a range of programs that engage Harvard faculty and students in new scholarly and research endeavors. Academic Engagement Programs also serves the public by hosting lectures, conferences, and symposia that aim to increase understanding about cutting-edge research.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Fellowship Program

As a fellow, you will focus on your individual project while benefiting from a dynamic, multidisciplinary community at Harvard University. Only 5 percent of applicants are selected each year. Fellows—women and men—are at the forefront of the arts, journalism, humanities, sciences, and social sciences.

Harvard Student Research Partnerships

Our Radcliffe Institute Research Partnership Program matches students with leading artists, scholars, scientists, and professionals.

The partnership is designed to be mutually beneficial. Fellows act as mentors, while students provide research assistance, acquire valuable research skills, and participate in the Institute’s rich intellectual life.

Graduate Student Fellow

As a graduate student fellow, you are expected to reside in Cambridge during your fellowship year. You will participate in the Radcliffe Institute Fellowship Program by attending weekly fellows' talks and lunches. You are also invited, though not required, to present your own work in a talk to the fellows. 

Carol K. Pforzheimer Student Fellowships

The Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America invites Harvard undergraduates to do research in the library's collections by applying for competitive awards up to $2,500. The research may be carried out in conjunction with a project for academic credit, although this is not required.

Research Support Grants

The Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America invites scholars whose research requires use of the library's collections to apply for research support.

Applications will be evaluated on the significance of the research and the project's potential contribution to the advancement of knowledge as well as its creativity in drawing on the library's holdings. Grants of up to $3,000 will be given on a competitive basis to cover travel expenses, living expenses (up to $125 per diem), photocopying, and other incidental research expenses, but not the purchase of durable equipment.

Dissertation Grants

The Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America invites scholars whose dissertation research requires use of the library's collections to apply for research support.

Applications will be evaluated on the significance of the research and the project's potential contribution to the advancement of knowledge as well as its creativity in drawing on the library's holdings. Grants of up to $3,000 will be given on a competitive basis to cover travel expenses, living expenses (up to $125 per diem), photocopying, and other incidental research expenses, but not the purchase of durable equipment.

Oral History Grants

The Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America invites scholars who are conducting oral history interviews relevant to the history of women or gender in the United States to apply for support of up to $3,000.

This grant stipulates that the interviews take place in accordance with guidelines of the Oral History Association, that consent is obtained from interviewees for their words to be viewed by researchers worldwide, and that true copies or transcripts of the original recording of the oral interviews, as well as copies of the consent forms, be deposited in the Schlesinger Library.


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Women's Studies Research Center

The Women’s Studies Research Center (WSRC) at Brandeis University is happy to celebrate its 10 Year Anniversary in 2012! We have a fantastic new video showcasing our Scholars and their work over this past decade, created by Scholar Ornit Barkai.
 
The WSRC is an innovative, interdisciplinary research facility of scholars, students and faculty who study gender issues and women's lives. 

Contact

515 South Street
Waltham, MA 02453
Ph. (781) 736-8100
Fx. (781) 736-8117
http://www.brandeis.edu/centers/wsrc
jparlon@brandeis.edu
reinharz@brandeis.edu

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Principal Staff

Shulamit Reinharz, Founding Director
E-mail: reinharz@brandeis.edu

Kayla Hammond Larkin, Assistant to Shulamit Reinharz, National Coordinator for HBI Conversations

Sarah JM Hough-Napierata, Assistant Director
E-mail: shough@brandeis.edu

Rosa Di Virgilio Taormina, Scholars Program Director
E-mail: rdivir@brandeis.edu

Michele L'Heureux, Curator and Director of the Arts
E-mail: mlheur@brandeis.edu

Kristen Mullin, Student Scholar Partnership Program Coordinator
E-mail: mullin@brandeis.edu
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The Arts Program

The Arts Program at the Women's Studies Research Center is home to the Kniznick Gallery (Est. 2001). The Kniznick Gallery is committed to feminist exhibitions of artistic excellence that reflect the activities of the Women's Studies Research Center Scholars and engage communities within and beyond Brandeis University. The art on display is a vehicle through which the Center seeks to promote dialogue about important issues and address the ever-changing challenges related to women and gender.

 
 
The National Initiative on Gender, Culture and Leadership in Medicine known as “C - Change” (for culture - change) engages medical schools in action research with Brandeis University to facilitate culture change so that all faculty members can contribute fully. C - Change has generated substantial qualitative and quantitative data on the culture of academic medicine.  These data have been used by the medical schools partnering in the C - Change Learning Action Network, and by additional schools, and have contributed to innovations and culture change initiatives to realize the potential of all faculty.
 
 
Founded and directed by WSRC Scholar Paula Doress-Worters, the Ernestine Rose Society works to revive the legacy of "America's first feminist leader." Recognizing Ernestine Rose's pioneering role in the first wave of feminism, the society is committed to raising awareness about Ernestine, who did so much to promote women's rights in the United States and internationally.
 
 
Housed at the WSRC and founded in 1997 at Brandeis University, HBI is the world's first university-based research institute devoted to the study of Jews and gender. HBI's mission is to develop fresh ways of thinking about Jews and gender worldwide.
 
 
Directed by Susan Eisenberg, the On Equal Terms Project uses personal testimony and the arts as springboards for education, discussion, and action about employment equity. Founded in 2007, the Project  conducts research, develops local and national programming, and organizes national touring for the On Equal Terms installation.
 
 
Founded by WSRC Resident Scholar Liane Curtis, the Rebecca Clarke Society honors the life and work of composer and violist Rebecca Clarke (1886-1979). The society encourages and supports performances, recordings, publications, writings and scholarship concerning Clarke and her music.
 
 
The Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism, the nation’s first independent reporting center based at a university, was launched in September 2004 by Florence George Graves. Seasoned journalists (including WSRC Resident Scholar E.J. Graff, who heads the Institute’s Gender & Justice Project) investigate suspected injustices — and then take results public, via mainstream and thought-leader publications, broadcasts and Web magazines.
 
 
The WAGE Project, Inc. is a nonprofit organization dedicated to ending wage discrimination against women in the American workplace in the near future. Its nickname, WAGE, is a nod to the goal the project pursues: Women Are Getting Even.  
WAGE inspires and helps working women take the steps needed to ensure every woman is paid what she’s worth.

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Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

The Scholars Program

The Brandeis University Women’s Studies Research Center Scholars Program mission is to be an innovative and mutually supportive community of scholars engaged in research and artistic activity.

Student Scholar Partnership

The WSRC Internship Program: Student-Scholar Partners (SSP), currently coordinated by Kristen Mullin, was launched in the spring of 1997 as a project of the Women’s Studies Program at Brandeis University.  Today, the Program continues as an important component of the Women’s Studies Research Center (WSRC).  This paid internship opportunity is designed to give undergraduate students a unique learning experience by allowing them to work side by side with a Scholar or faculty member in an interdisciplinary environment.


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Women's Resource Center

The Women's Resource Center is an integral part of Washington State University's commitment to equity and diversity. The Center works to promote a safe and supportive climate that enables women to engage as full and active participants within the university community. The Women's Resource Center helps transform the educational environment into a more inclusive and progressive institution by assisting, supporting, and mentoring women at Washington State University.

The Women's Resource Center develops programs to celebrate women's diversity and contributions, while actively confronting societal challenges and obstacles through activism and working for change. Our programs address gender, race, class, and their intersections, recognizing the relevance of these inter-related social issues. Offering resources and educational programs to members of our university, we engage the larger constituencies to act as change agents for a more diverse and inclusive educational system.

Contact


Pullman, WA 99164-4005
Ph. (509) 335-6849
Fx. (509) 335-4377
http://www.women.wsu.edu/
kim_barrett@wsu.edu


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Principal Staff

Turea Erwin, Director & NEW Leadership Inland Northwest Coordinator
Ph. (509) 335-8200
E-mail: turea_erwin@wsu.edu

Kim Barrett, Program Support Specialist
Ph. (509) 335-4386
E-mail: kim_barrett@wsu.edu

Stephanie Russell, YWCA of WSU Program Coordinator
Ph. (509) 335-2572
E-mail: stephanie.russell@email.wsu.edu

Joseph Pacific, Program Coordinator-Women's Transit and Campus Walking Services
Ph. (509) 335-1856
E-mail: jpacific@wsu.edu
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Projects & Campaigns

 
A core pillar of the Women's Resource Center, Women's Transit strives to extend the values of inspiration, encouragement, and empowerment to all students at Washignton State University. The primary goal of this program is to act as a resource to reduce the incidents of sexual assault in the community. Students who feel safe getting to and from classes, work, and social events are far more likely to succeed than students who are scared to simply live their lives while at school. We also believe that giving back to the community is incredibly important to a well-rounded education. We give nearly all students who apply the opportunity to learn valuable skills in communication, crisis management, and sexual assault risk reduction.
 
 
The Coalition for Women Students (CWS) was formed in 1912 as the Association for Women Students (AWS) by the Washington State College women students. The term “coalition” was adopted in the fall of 1993 to express a common vision for the student groups involved. A coalition is comprised of distinct groups or persons in alliance for joint action. In this case the joint action is heightening awareness of issues pertaining to women locally and globally.
 
 
APAW is committed to coordinating student programs that heighten awareness of Pacific and Asian women’s issues. APAW’s programs empower community and individual pride, celebrate our rich cultures, and highlight our diverse contributions. The Association of Pacific and Asian Women fosters leadership development opportunities for women by bringing ideas and vision into action on an individual and group level. Women’s leadership roles are supported and fostered within our organization.
 
 
The Black Women's Caucus (BWC) serves as a support system for African American Women on the WSU campus. Its main focus is to serve as an instrument through which African American women are able to express their concerns about issues they face globally as well as locally. BWC is also concerned with educating other students about the pioneering roles and major contributions of African American women in this society. Membership is open to all students who share the concerns of Black Women's Caucus.
 
 
Mujeres Unidas represents the interests and issues of Chicanas/Latinas at WSU and coordinates activities and opportunities of interest to multicultural women students. Members contribute to community projects and provide peer support for Chicanas and Latinas. In addition, MU provides women with the opportunity to gain leadership training and experience.
 
 
The purpose of the Native American Women's Association (NAWA) is to address the needs and concerns of Native American people, with a special emphasis on issues that affect Native American women. NAWA encourages women of color to assume leadership roles on campus and become actively involved in the community.
 
 
The YWCA of WSU is a member association of the YWCA of the USA. We have been part of the WSU community since 1895 and are proud to be part of this women's membership movement.

 


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

 
Whether you are looking to give two hours or fourty hours of your time this semester, Women's Transit and Campus Walking Services wants to bring you on as part of the team. No prior experience in ANYTHING is necessary. We will train everyone is driving, dispatching, and walking. You don't even need a driver license (we obviously won't place you as a driver, but there are many other things that you can do)!

 


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Effective_Philanthropy

Mary Ellen S. Capek is a Principal in Capek & Associates, a philanthropic and nonprofit research and consulting group based in Corrales, New Mexico, and a Visiting Scholar at the Anderson Schools of Management at the University of New Mexico.

Teaser: 

Organizational Success Through Deep Diversity & Gender Equality (by Mary Ellen Capek, Former Executive Director)

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THE GIRLS REPORT: What We Know & Need to Know About Growing Up Female

"Seven years ago the National Council for Research on Women and its member centers issued major reports on the status of girls in society, in schools, and in youth organizations in the United States. Since then, university researchers and popular writers have focussed attention on girls. The Girls Report is a fresh and timely look at every aspect of life for girls as we look toward the new millenium.

"If the reports in the early 1990s struck a chord of concern and a call to action, the tone of this report is optimism and activism. As we say at Girls Incorporated, girls are strong, smart and bold unless society puts barriers in their way. Lynn Phillips and the National Council staff have captured the strength, the energy, and the possibilities of girls on their way to becoming young women, while calling on the rest of us to be vigilant in supporting girls' high hopes and expectations for their own achievement."

Teaser: 

The Girls Report surveys current studies on girls, mapping theoretical debates, countering popular myths with recent research findings, and highlighting successful programs serving diverse populations. Chapters on education, health, self-esteem, violence, sexuality, and economic realities conclude with clear recommendations for action. A comprehensive bibliography offers resources to educators, researchers, policymakers, and all concerned with increasing opportunities for girls.

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MISSING Information About Women's Lives

National researchers, policymakers, and the media have voiced major concerns in recent weeks about a pattern of distorting knowledge-based information and science in the service of political goals under the current administration. Now, the National Council for Research on Women, now Re:Gender, brings you the story from the women's research and policy perspective.

The Report
MISSING: Information About Women's Lives is a 24-page report that documents how crucial data on women and girls is disappearing. Download the report in PDF format (PDF, 408 KB) or order a copy ($10 plus shipping).

Executive Summary
To download the executive summary in PDF format, click here (PDF, 172 KB).

Press Release

Teaser: 

Over the past few years, vital data has been deleted, buried, distorted, or has otherwise gone missing from government websites and publications. The National Council for Research on Women, now Re:Gender has documented in this report, the deletion and omission of such information and outlined how these actions directly affect women's lives.

Cover Image: 
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