Communications, Media & Gender

Mainstream media and the communications sector are still largely male-dominated in management, ownership and representation. Women hold only 3 percent of leadership positions in the sector. And despite the parity of female and male graduates from journalism schools in the U.S., women reporters on average make $9,000 less per year than their male cohorts. New media and the internet are offering new opportunities for women’s involvement, with an estimated 7.3 million more women online than men and 23 million women who use blogs, including the emerging “momosphere,” or moms who blog. A vibrant feminist media is building alliances to combat sexism and amplify voices and critical viewpoints. Initiatives from our network, such as SheSource and the Women’s Media Center, are aiming to address the absence of women as experts and opinion leaders in the public sphere.

OBJECT and Turn Your Back on Page 3 submit evidence to the Leveson Inquiry

 The joint OBJECT / Turn Your Back on Page 3 submission provides a snapshot of „A Week In The Life Of' The Sun, The Daily Star and The Sport. It highlights the „Page 3‟ phenomenon, the adverts for the porn and sex industries, and other innumerable ways in which women – and even crimes against women, such as rape and murder – are routinely trivialised and sexualised within the UK press. It calls on the Leveson Inquiry to address this relentless portrayal of women as sex objects as part of its remit to examine the culture and ethics of the press, and it provides recommendations to tackle the hyper-sexualisation and objectification of women in UK tabloids.  

Read the OBJECT / Turn Your Back on Page 3 submission to the Leveson Inquiry

 

URL: 
http://www.object.org.uk/component/content/article/3-news/151-object-turn-your-back-on-page-3-submission-to-the-leveson-inquiry
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