Communications, Media & Gender

Mainstream media and the communications sector are still largely male-dominated in management, ownership and representation. Women hold only 3 percent of leadership positions in the sector. And despite the parity of female and male graduates from journalism schools in the U.S., women reporters on average make $9,000 less per year than their male cohorts. New media and the internet are offering new opportunities for women’s involvement, with an estimated 7.3 million more women online than men and 23 million women who use blogs, including the emerging “momosphere,” or moms who blog. A vibrant feminist media is building alliances to combat sexism and amplify voices and critical viewpoints. Initiatives from our network, such as SheSource and the Women’s Media Center, are aiming to address the absence of women as experts and opinion leaders in the public sphere.

Money Across Generations II: Gender Differences

Women are engaging in more regular financial conversations with their families, but men may be more willing to reach for their wallets – at least for certain types of purchases. New findings from the Money Across Generations IISM study, released today by Ameriprise Financial, demonstrate significant differences in how American men and women approach money matters, especially those concerning their adult children and parents.
 
A vast majority (93%) of baby boomers say they’ve provided financial support to their adult children, but fathers are significantly more likely than mothers to have helped fund an automobile purchase (58% vs. 48%) or co-signed a loan or lease agreement (42% vs. 32%).
URL: 
http://newsroom.ameriprise.com/images/20018/MAG%20Research%20Report%20Gender%20Differences%206-8-12.pdf
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