Advertising, Marketing & Stereotypes

Women make over 80 percent of purchasing decisions in the U.S. and are primary consumers of a wide spectrum of products and services, but they are significantly underrepresented in the advertising and marketing fields. The advertising sector is overwhelmingly male-dominated and managers and account executives continue to rely on sexualized and objectified images in their marketing. Such campaigns can be harmful to women and girls in reinforcing stereotypes about consumer preferences and gender roles. Marketing to “tweens” (ages 8-12) and teens has added new psychological and economic pressures on girls to conform to unrealistic standards and increase consumption.

The Status of Women in the U.S. Media 2012

There is a crisis of representation in the media. We live in a racially and ethnically diverse nation that is 51% female, but the news media itself remains staggeringly limited to a single demographic.
The media is the single most powerful tool at our disposal; it has the power to educate, effect social change, and determine the political policies and elections that shape our lives. Our work in diversifying the media landscape is critical to the health of our culture and democracy.
 
Consider the Following Statistics
  • According to the Global Media Monitoring Project 2010, 24% of the people interviewed, heard, seen, or read about in mainstream broadcast and print news were female.  Only 13% of stories focused specifically on women and 6% on issues of gender equality or inequality.
    URL: 
    http://www.womensmediacenter.com/pages/the-problem
Syndicate content