Economic Development & Microfinance

Women contribute actively to economic development and sustainability. Their social status determines their access to opportunities for economic autonomy and advancement. In the US, the glass ceiling is still firmly in place in many sectors of the economy. Globally, economic development efforts are doomed to failure without women’s active involvement and participation. More efforts need to focus on empowering women as wage earners, entrepreneurs and business owners. Microfinance programs also offer great potential to lift women out of poverty.

The Economic Impact of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 - Third Quarterly Report

The Council of Economic Advisors developed a multifaceted analysis indicating that the Recovery Act (ARRA) has played an essential role in changing the trajectory of the economy. It has raised the level of GDP substantially in its first full year of existence and has saved or created between 2.2 and 2.3 million jobs as of the first quarter of 2010. The tax relief and income support provisions of the ARRA alone account for roughly half of the beneficial employment effects.

To read the full report, click here.

Teaser: 

The Council of Economic Advisors developed a multifaceted analysis indicating that the Recovery Act (ARRA) has played an essential role in changing the trajectory of the economy. It has raised the level of GDP substantially in its first full year of existence and has saved or created between 2.2 and 2.3 million jobs as of the first quarter of 2010. The tax relief and income support provisions of the ARRA alone account for roughly half of the beneficial employment effects.

 

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Community Voices of the Economy Survey

Community Voices on the Economy -- a joint project of the Ms. Foundation for Women and the Center for Community Change (CCC) -- aims to to help social change organizations understand how low-income communities are faring in the current economic crisis and how these communities view potential solutions. The project includes a particular focus on communities of color, and especially women in those communities. This particular study provides survey results from communities, particularly those of color, who are hurt by the economic downturn and continue to worry about their future.  

To read full survey, click here.

 

Teaser: 

Community Voices on the Economy -- a joint project of the Ms. Foundation for Women and the Center for Community Change (CCC) -- aims to to help social change organizations understand how low-income communities are faring in the current economic crisis and how these communities view potential solutions. The project includes a particular focus on communities of color, and especially women in those communities. This particular study provides survey results from communities, particularly those of color, who are hurt by the economic downturn and continue to worry about their future.  

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ARRA and the Economic Crisis: One Year Later

Has ARRA worked to offset this growing economic divide in our nation, and offered relief to hard hit communities? Has ARRA worked to promote greater racial and socioeconomic equity in our nation? One year into the imlpementation of ARRA we find mixed results, and offer critical lessons learned from the ARRA experience.

The following report examines the disparate impact of the recession and housing crisis, specifically reviewing the impact of ARRA on relieving this unfolding crisis in hardest-hit communities. The report also pulls from the expertise and experience of equity advocates in the broader social justice field, offering reflections from the field by those working directly to produce more equitable outcomes in our response to the economic crisis.

To read the full report, click here.

 

Teaser: 

Has ARRA worked to offset this growing economic divide in our nation, and offered relief to hard hit communities? Has ARRA worked to promote greater racial and socioeconomic equity in our nation? One year into the imlpementation of ARRA we find mixed results, and offer critical lessons learned from the ARRA experience.

The following report examines the disparate impact of the recession and housing crisis, specifically reviewing the impact of ARRA on relieving this unfolding crisis in hardest-hit communities. The report also pulls from the expertise and experience of equity advocates in the broader social justice field, offering reflections from the field by those working directly to produce more equitable outcomes in our response to the economic crisis.

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Estimated Impact of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act on Employment and Economic Output as of September 2009

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) contains a variety of provisions intended to boost economic activity and employment in the United States. Section 1512(e) of the law requires the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) to comment on the reports filed by certain recipients of funding under ARRA that detail how many jobs were created or retained through funded activities. This CBO report fulfills that requirement. It also provides CBO's estimates of ARRA's overall impact on employment and economic output in the first quarter of calendar year 2010.

To read the full report, click here.

Teaser: 

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) contains a variety of provisions intended to boost economic activity and employment in the United States. Section 1512(e) of the law requires the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) to comment on the reports filed by certain recipients of funding under ARRA that detail how many jobs were created or retained through funded activities. This CBO report fulfills that requirement. It also provides CBO's estimates of ARRA's overall impact on employment and economic output in the first quarter of calendar year 2010.

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Ensuring Equal Opportunity in Our Nation's Economic Recovery Efforts

When it comes to ensuring that the economic stimulus and recovery process promotes equal opportunity for all communities, the law is excellent, but it is almost entirely up to us to uphold and enforce that law.

This fact sheet provides informtation and ideas for ensuring that federal investments in America's economic recovery create gender and more equal opportunity for all. Specifically, it describes the ways in which existing laws require equal opportunity in jobs, housing, healthcare, transportation, and other sectors, and offers specific ideas for holding public and private officials accountable.

Teaser: 

This fact sheet provides informtation and ideas for ensuring that federal investments in America's economic recovery create gender and more equal opportunity for all. Specifically, it describes the ways in which existing laws require equal opportunity in jobs, housing, healthcare, transportation, and other sectors, and offers specific ideas for holding public and private officials accountable.

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Recession, Stimulus and the Child Care Sector: Understanding Economic Dynamics, Calculating Impact

 As part of the new Stimulus Bill (ARRA), states and localities may be required to show economic impact of the stimulus funds. This brief has been developed to help state policymakers calculate the stimulus effects of increased child care spending on output and employment in the state economy.

There are three important aspects of the child care sector which need to be counted when assessing economic impact: 1) direct employment and output in the child care sector itself, 2) multiplier effects of the sector in the broader regional economy, and 3) the social infrastructure role child care plays in supporting the parent workforce. All of these are short term economic effects. This report will address each of these aspects in turn and show how to calculate these effects using an example with data from the State of Kansas. But first we must understand the structure of the child care sector.

Teaser: 

This brief has been developed to help state policymakers calculate the stimulus effects of increased child care spending on output and employment in the state economy. There are three important aspects of the child care sector which need to be counted when assessing economic impact: 1) direct employment and output in the child care sector itself, 2) multiplier effects of the sector in the broader regional economy, and 3) the social infrastructure role child care plays in supporting the parent workforce. All of these are short term economic effects.

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