Economic Development & Microfinance

Women contribute actively to economic development and sustainability. Their social status determines their access to opportunities for economic autonomy and advancement. In the US, the glass ceiling is still firmly in place in many sectors of the economy. Globally, economic development efforts are doomed to failure without women’s active involvement and participation. More efforts need to focus on empowering women as wage earners, entrepreneurs and business owners. Microfinance programs also offer great potential to lift women out of poverty.

National Women's Law Center

The National Women's Law Center was founded in 1972 as a non-profit advocacy organization working to advance the progress of women, girls, and families with emphasis on employment, education, reproductive rights and health, and family issues. The Center has been at the forefront of the major legal and public policy initiatives in this country to improve the lives of women: educating state, local, and federal policy-makers as well as members of the public about critical women's issues; building and leading coalitions; litigating ground-breaking cases and informing landmark Supreme Court decisions. The Center is a sponsor of human rights, helping to resonate women's voices through the minds of public policy-makers, advocates, and the public alike.

Contact

11 Dupont Circle, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Ph. (202) 588-5180
Fx. (202) 588-5185
http://www.nwlc.org/
info@nwlc.org


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Principal Staff

Nancy Duff Campbell, Co-President
E-mail: campbell@nwlc.org

Marcia Greenberger, Co-President
E-mail: mgreenberger@nwlc.org

Joan Entmacher, Vice President for Family Economic Security

Fatima Goss Graves, Vice President for Education and Employment

Niesa Brateman Halpern, Vice President of Administration and Finance

Emily Martin, Vice President and General Counsel

Karen Schneider, Vice President for Communications

Judy Waxman, Vice President for Health and Reproductive Rights
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Projects & Campaigns

 
The child care needs of American families have increased sharply as women with children enter the paid workforce in growing numbers and as recognition grows about the importance of high-quality early learning experiences to help children get a strong start. We're working to create and strengthen policies to improve the quality, affordability, and accessibility of child care and early education.

 
Women and girls have come a long way since the enactment of Title IX – the federal civil rights law that prohibits sex discrimination in education. Still, far too many students are denied equal educational opportunities, particularly low-income and minority students. We're working to eliminate and prevent barriers, including discrimination, to students' success in school.
 
 
Women still face discrimination in the workplace, and they still earn, on average, only 77 cents for every dollar earned by men. We're working to achieve equality in the workplace, including equal pay, the elimination of harassment and other forms of sex discrimination, and the removal of barriers to nontraditional careers for women.

 
Women's health is endangered by limited access to health care, and reproductive rights are under concerted attack. We're working to protect reproductive rights, guarantee health care for women and families, and promote policies to advance and protect women's health.

 
When federal judges are not committed to enforcing basic rights critical to women, hard-won legal rights are drastically eroded. We're working to promote a fair and independent judiciary and supporting nominees who have demonstrated a commitment to equal opportunity for women and families.
 
 
Women are at greater risk of poverty than men at all stages of their lives because of ongoing employment discrimination and greater responsibilities for unpaid caregiving. We're working to strengthen income and work support programs to increase economic security for women and their families.
 
 
Women’s lower lifetime earnings and longer lifespan put them at far greater risk of poverty as they age than men. We’re working to increase women’s retirement security by strengthening Social Security and supporting pension and savings protections.

 
While the wealthiest Americans have benefited for years from tax cuts and tax loopholes, investments vital to women and their families have been shortchanged. We're working for a fair and progressive tax system that raises the revenue needed to meet our shared priorities and expand opportunity for all.


In the past half century, a commitment to principles of nondiscrimination and equality has transformed the lives of women and their families and the nation as a whole. But much remains to be done to ensure that the promise of equal opportunity is fulfilled in women's lives. We're working to realize a broad vision for progress for women and their families.

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Reports & Resources

For all publications, click here.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Public Policy Fellowship

The fellow will work on a variety of issues, which may include: tax and budget policy, child care, income support, retirement security, education reform, equal education and employment opportunity, barriers for low-wage workers, and education

Employment Fellow

The fellow will focus on promoting opportunities for women and girls in school and at work. The issues may include improving graduation rates for girls, with a particular focus on low income girls, girls of color, and teen parents; addressing gender-based harassment and bullying; increasing gender equity in athletics, removing barriers for women in nontraditional education and job training; advocating for workplace fairness and equal pay. Responsibilities may include researching and analyzing policy and legal issues and drafting a variety of materials, such as memos, fact sheets, reports, comments on regulations, legal briefs.

Health Policy Fellow

As part of the Center’s work on women and health reform, the Health Fellow will work on a range of issues related to women’s access to health care, with particular emphasis on access to comprehensive and affordable health coverage for low-income women. Responsibilities will include gathering, analyzing and synthesizing research and data from a variety of sources; analyzing policy proposals; drafting reports and other written materials, and working with national and state-based coalitions on legislative and regulatory matters.


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International Center for Research on Women

ICRW's mission is to empower women, advance gender equality and fight poverty in the developing world. To accomplish this, ICRW works with partners to conduct empirical research, build capacity and advocate for evidence-based, practical ways to change policies and programs.

Contact

1120 20th St. N.W.
Washington, DC 20036
Ph. (202) 797-0007
Fx. (202) 797-0020
http://www.icrw.org
info@icrw.org


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Principal Staff

Sarah Degnan Kambou, President

Lyric Thompson, Special Assistant to the President/Policy Advocate

Kristin Fack, Administrative Assistant
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Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

Adolescents

ICRW has been examining the lives of adolescents – especially girls – for more than two decades. Our work focuses on improving their well-being and identifying ways to change deeply entrenched traditional practices that prevent girls and young women from reaching their full potential. We believe that making the abilities, attitudes and options of adolescent girls and boys more equitable is one of the most effective ways to empower women. And our research shows that all aspects of young people’s lives – school, relationships, work, health and marriage – must be addressed in order to bring about lasting social change. Adolescent programs and policies require working with not only girls, but boys, parents, teachers, community members, leaders, schools and employers, too.
 
 
ICRW has been examining for more than 30 years how disparities between women and men affect agricultural productivity and food security. Our research helps development organizations, policymakers and others find practical ways to enhance women’s roles in agricultural production and trade, thereby improving their incomes and livelihoods.

ICRW analyzes the differences between the responsibilities, limitations and interests of male and female farmers to design strategies that provide services, training and incomes. Our findings and recommendations help identify sound approaches that ensure efforts reach women as well as men. Ultimately, we aim to help farmers become competitive participants in the agricultural marketplace and reap the financial benefits.
 
 
Economic development efforts to combat poverty can only succeed if women are part of the solution. Doing so yields a double dividend: When women are economically empowered, they raise healthier, better educated families. Their countries are more economically prosperous because of it, too.

Since our founding more than 30 years ago, ICRW's work has expanded understanding of women's economic contributions as well as the hurdles that prevent them from being successful. Our efforts focus on how gender affects economic development efforts related to assets and property rights as well as employment, enterprise development and financial services.
 
We strive to increase women's ownership, use and control of assets and property. We want to empower women as economic agents and better their ability to access markets on competitive and equitable terms. And with our partners, ICRW aims to integrate gender perspectives into program and institution activities. We believe such an approach improves the likelihood that efforts to strengthen women economically are successful.
 
 
ICRW was among the first organizations in the early 1990s to call attention to how gender inequality fueled the transmission of HIV and AIDS among women. Today, ICRW continues to push the AIDS agenda forward. As the global response moves from a focus on crisis management into a sustained, long-term strategy, our work centers around how HIV programs and policies can better serve the needs of women and girls. We work with partners to design, monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of programs that strive to reduce women's social and biological vulnerability to HIV. We also aim to weave these programs into existing family planning, reproductive and maternal health services. Ultimately, we strive to influence national policies by guiding governments and others on how to address the role that gender norms play in the prevention, support and treatment of HIV.
 
 
ICRW strives to demonstrate that improved sexual and reproductive health outcomes are pre-conditions for achieving gender equality, empowering women and reducing global poverty. ICRW’s research in this area aims to build a sound evidence base to inform programs and policies by defining the fundamental connections between gender, reproductive health and development, highlighting the importance of adolescent transitions to adulthood, analyzing means for facilitating women’s access to safe and effective reproductive control options, and undertaking rigorous evaluations to demonstrate what works.
 
Our approach examines how gender equality is both a determinant and a consequence of demographic change. For example, our current research suggests that as fertility rates decline in developing countries, women gain increased access to higher education and formal employment opportunities. This in turn can facilitate more transformative shifts in gender relations. Findings such as these bolster the policy directive that advancing women’s and girls’ reproductive health creates conditions that improve the quality of life for individuals, families, communities and nations.
 
 
ICRW employs a multifaceted approach to reducing violence against women. We conduct empirical research to better understand the incidence of violence, costs associated with it and factors that lead to it. We also are building evidence on interventions designed to prevent violence against women, particularly comprehensive approaches that include economically empowering women, involving boys and men, protecting survivors of violence and rehabilitating men who are abusive. ICRW is examining the policy dimensions of violence prevention by evaluating the impact of and challenges to existing legislation and using our findings to advocate for stronger, more effective laws. Finally, ICRW participates in strategic regional and global networks that work to strengthen civil society and advance the field of preventing violence against women.

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Reports & Resources

For all publications, click here.


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Click here for current employment opportunities.


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Women and Public Policy Program at the John F. Kennedy School of Government

The Women and Public Policy Program of Harvard Kennedy School closes gender gaps in economic opportunity, political participation, health and education by creating knowledge, training leaders and informing public policy and organizational practices.
 
Our research provides evidence-based insights on the role of gender in shaping economic, political and social opportunities available to individuals. We identify successful interventions and measure their impact on women, men, and society, then share recommendations on what policies, organizational practices and leadership techniques help close involuntary gaps.
 
We train today’s leaders and prepare future leaders to create a more gender equal world, while providing women with skills and tools to successfully navigate existing systems.

Contact

79 John F. Kennedy Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Ph. (617) 495-8143
Fx. (617) 496-6154
http://www.ksg.harvard.edu/wappp
WAPPP@harvard.edu


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Principal Staff

Danielle Boudrow, Coordinator and Assistant to the Executive Director
Ph. (617) 496-9157
E-mail: danielle_boudrow@harvard.edu

Naisha Bradley, Program Manager
Ph. (617) 496-6609
E-mail: naisha_bradley@harvard.edu

Nicole Carter, Associate Director for Finance & Administration
Ph. (617) 495-1354
E-mail: nicole_carter@harvard.edu

Kerry Conley, Communications Manager
Ph. (617) 495-8330
E-mail: kerry_conley@harvard.edu

Megan Farwell, Research Manager
Ph. (617) 496-4786
E-mail: megan_farwell@hks.harvard.edu

Heather McKinnon Glennon, Financial and Administrative Coordinator
Ph. (617) 384-7575
E-mail: heather_mckinnon@harvard.edu

Alicia Hammond, Associate
Ph. (617) 495-8756
E-mail: alicia_hammond@hks.harvard.edu
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Economic Opporunity

Our goals are to inform decision makers across all sectors on what policies, organizational practices and leadership techniques help close gender gaps and to train today’s and tomorrow’s leaders on how to create a more gender equal world, and to empower women to navigate systems effectively.
 
 
The Gender and Political Opportunity area integrates the study of gender and politics to understand gender dynamics in political action, discourse and within governmental structures. This area examines research of representation and participation within political structures to discover which practices yield the most effective results regarding gender equity. The goal is to share these strategies that enable women to participate and succeed in politics.

 
 
 
Closing the Global Gender Gap: A Call to Action is an initiative led by the Women and Public Policy Program in collaboration with the Center for International Development at the Harvard Kennedy School that aims to leverage Harvard University’s capacity for rigorous research and convening power toward creating gender equality.
 
The purpose of this initiative is threefold: to examine and quantify the impact of specific policy interventions, to develop a theory of change, and to stimulate innovative ideas and policy action in order to close the global gender gaps across four areas. These areas include economic participation and opportunity, educational attainment, health and survival, and political empowerment. There is enormous rhetoric about women’s empowerment—this initiative’s goal is to shed new light on the channels that successfully effect change.

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Reports & Resources

 

Ina Ganguli, Ricardo Hausmann and Martina Viarengo. International Labour Review (8 APR 2013)
Anti-statism and difference feminism in international social movements
Mansbridge, J. (2003). Anti-statism and Difference Feminism in International Social Movements. International Feminist Journal of Politics, 5, 3, 355-360.

Are outside offers an answer to the compensation negotiation dilemma for women?

Bowles, H.R. & Babcock, L. (2009). Are outside offers an answer to the compensation negotiation dilemma for women? Academy of Management Annual Meeting Proceedings.

Claiming fatherhood: Race and the dynamics of paternal involvement among unmarried men

Edin, K., Tach, L., & Mincy, R. (2009). Claiming Fatherhood: Race and the Dynamics of Paternal Involvement among Unmarried Men. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 621, 1, 149-177.

The cultural politics of everyday discourse: The case of “male chauvinist” 

Mansbridge, J., & Flaster, K. (2007). The Cultural Politics of Everyday Discourse: The Case of "Male Chauvinist". Critical Sociology, 33, 4, 627-660.

Do traditional institutions constrain female entrepreneurship? A field experiment on business training in India

Field, E., Jayachandran, S., & Pande, R. (2010). Do traditional institutions constrain female entrepreneurship? A field experiment on business training in India.American Economic Review, 100, 2, 125-129.

Exploring gendered behavior in the field with experiments: Why public goods are provided by women in a Nairobi slum

Greig, F., & Bohnet, I. (2009). Exploring gendered behavior in the field with experiments: Why public goods are provided by women in a Nairobi slum. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 70, 1-9.

Female leadership raises aspirations and educational attainment for girls: A policy experiment in India

Beaman, L., Duflo, E., Pande, R., & Topalova, P. (2012). Female leadership raises aspirations and educational attainment for girls: A policy experiment in India.Science, 335, 6068, 582-586.

Gender and persistence in negotiation: A dyadic perspective. 

Bowles, H. R., & Flynn, F. (2010). Gender and Persistence in Negotiation: A Dyadic Perspective. Academy of Management Journal, 53, 4, 769-787.

Gender differences in research grant applications and funding outcomes for medical school faculty

Waisbren, S. E., Bowles, H., Hasan, T., Zou, K. H., Emans, S. J., Goldberg, C., Gould, S., Levin, D., Lieberman, E., Loeken, M., Longtine, J., Nadelson, C., Patenaude, A.F., Quinn, D., Randolph, A.G., Solet, J.M., Ullrich, N., Walensky, R., Weitzman, P., Christou, H. (2008). Gender Differences in Research Grant Applications and Funding Outcomes for Medical School Faculty. Journal of Women's Health, 17, 2, 207-214.

Gender in job negotiations: A two-level game

Bowles, H. R., & McGinn, K. L. (2008). Gender in Job Negotiations: A Two-Level Game. Negotiation Journal, 24, 4, 393-410.

Introduction: Special section: Gender in negotiation

Bohnet, I., & Bowles, H. R. (2008). Introduction: Special section: Gender in negotiation. Negotiation Journal, 24, 4, 389-392.

Is there reciprocity in a reciprocal-exchange economy? Evidence of gendered norms from a slum in Nairobi, Kenya

Greig, F. & Bohnet, I. (2008). Is there reciprocity in a reciprocal-exchange economy? Evidence of gendered norms from a slum in Nairobi, Kenya. Economic Inquiry, 46, 1, 77-83.

“Male chauvinist,” “feminist,” “sexist,” and “sexual harassment”: Different trajectories in feminist linguistic innovation
 
Mansbridge, J., & Flaster, K. (2005). Male chauvinist, feminist, sexist, and sexual harassment: Different trajectories in feminist linguistic innovation. American Speech, 80, 3.

Moving teenagers out of high-risk neighborhoods: How girls fare better than boys

Clampet-Lundquist, S., Edin, K., Kling, J. R., & Duncan, G. J. (2011). Moving teenagers out of high-risk neighborhoods: How girls fare better than boys. American Journal of Sociology, 116, 4, 1154-1189.

Quota problems: Combating the dangers of essentialism 

Mansbridge, J. (2005). Quota Problems: Combating the Dangers of Essentialism. Politics & Gender, 1, 4, 622-638.

Parenting as a “package deal”: Relationships, fertility, and nonresident father involvement among unmarried parents

Tach, L., Mincy, R. B., & Edin, K. (2010). Parenting as a "Package Deal": Relationships, Fertility, and Nonresident Father Involvement Among Unmarried Parents.Demography, 47, 1, 181-204.

Poverty and the American family: A decade in review

Edin, K., & Kissane, R. J. (2010). Poverty and the american family: A decade in review. Journal of Marriage and Family, 72, 3, 460-479.

Powerful women: Does exposure reduce bias?

Beaman, L., Chattopadhyay, R., Duflo, E., Pande, R., & Topalova, P. (2009). Powerful women: Does exposure reduce bias? Quarterly Journal of Economics,124, 4, 1497-1540.

The relationships contexts of young disadvantaged men

Tach, L., & Edin, K. (2011). The Relationship Contexts of Young Disadvantaged Men. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 635, 1, 76-94.

Sex differences in research grant applications and funding outcomes for medical school faculty. 

Waisbren, S. E., Bowles, H., Hasan, T., Zou, K. H., Emans, S. J., Goldberg, C., Gould, S., Christou, H. (2008).
Gender differences in research grant applications and funding outcomes for medical school faculty. Journal of Women's Health (2002), 17,2, 207-14.

Should blacks represent blacks and women represent women? A contingent “yes”

Mansbridge, J. (1999). Should Blacks Represent Blacks and Women Represent Women? A Contingent "Yes". Journal of Politics, 61, 3, 628-657.

Social incentives for gender differences in the propensity to initiate negotiation: Sometimes it does hurt to ask. 

Bowles, H. R., Babcock, L., & Lai, L. (2007). Social incentives for gender differences in the propensity to initiate negotiations: Sometimes it does hurt to ask.Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 103, 1, 84-103.

Status and distrust: The relevance of inequality and betrayal aversion

Hong, K., & Bohnet, I. (2007). Status and distrust: The relevance of inequality and betrayal aversion. Journal of Economic Psychology, 28, 2.)

Toward a theory of backlash: Dynamic resistance and the central role of power

Mansbridge, J., & Shames, S. L. (2008). Toward a Theory of Backlash: Dynamic Resistance and the Central Role of Power. Politics and Gender, 4, 4, 623-633.

Trust and the reference points for trustworthiness in gulf and western countries

Bohnet, I., Zeckhauser, R., & Herrmann, B. (2010). Trust and the reference points for trustworthiness in gulf and western countries. Quarterly Journal of Economics,125, 2, 811-828.
 
 
Cohen, Dara Kay, Amelia Hoover Green, and Elisabeth Jean Wood, February 2013. United States Insistute of Peace.
 
The closing of the gender gap in education: Does it foretell the closing of the employment, marriage, and motherhood gaps?

Ganguli, I. Hausmann, R., & Viarengo, M. (2011). The closing of the gender gap in education: Does it foretell the closing of the employment, marriage, and motherhood gaps? (Working paper). 

The elasticity of trust: How to promote trust in the Arab Middle East and the United States

Bohnet, I., Herrmann, B., Al-Ississ, M., Robbett, A., Al-Yahia, K.,& Zeckhauser, R. (2010). The elasticity of trust: How to promote trust in the Arab Middle East (Working paper).
 

Desai, S.D., Chugh, D., & Brief, A. (2012). Marriage structure and resistance to the gender revolution in the workplace (Working paper). 

Performance and information: The role of organizational demography

Bohnet, I. & Saidi, F. (2011). Performance and information: The role of organizational demography (Working paper).

When performance trumps gender bias: Joint versus separate evaluation

Bohnet, I., van Geen, A., Bazerman, M. H. Norris, P. (2012). When performance trumps bias: Joint versus separate evaluation (Working paper).
 

Norris, P. (2012). Gender equality in elected office in Asia Pacific: Six actions to expand women’s empowerment.

Militarizing men: Gender, conscription, and war in post-Soviet Russia

Eichler, M. (2012). Militarizing men: Gender, conscription, and war in post-Soviet Russia. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press.

Promises I can keep: Why poor women put motherhood before marriage.

Edin, K., & Kefalas, M. (2005). Promises I can keep: Why poor women put motherhood before marriage. Berkeley: University of California Press.

When Johnny and Jane come marching home: How all of us can help veterans

Caplan, P. J. (2011). When Johnny and Jane come marching home: How all of us can help veterans. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

Why we lost the ERA 

Mansbridge, J. J. (1986). Why we lost the ERA. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 
 

Edin, K. & Tach, L. (2012). Becoming a parent: Social contexts of fertility during young adulthood. In A. Booth (Ed.), Early adulthood in the family context (185-220). New York: Springer.

Daddy, baby, momma, maybe: Low-income urban fathers and the “package deal” of family life

Edin, K., Nelson, T., & Reed, J.M. (2011). In M.J. Carlson & P. England (Eds.), Social class and changing families in an unequal America (85-107). Palo Alto: Stanford University Press.

Feminism

Mansbridge, J. & Okin, S.M. (2007). Feminism. In R. Goodin, P. Pettit, & T. Pogge (Eds.), A companion to contemporary political philosophy, 2nd edition (332-359). Oxford: Blackwell.

Making a way out of no way: How mothers meet basic family needs while moving from welfare to work.

Clampet-Lundquist, S., Edin, K., London, A., Scott, E., & Hunter, V. (2004). Making a way out of no way: How mothers meet basic family needs while moving from welfare to work. In A.C. Crouter & A. Booth (Eds.), Work-family challenges for low-income parents and their children (203-242). Malwah: Lawrence Earlbaum Associates.

Political reservation and substantive representation: Evidence form Indian Village Councils

Beaman, L., Duflo, E., Pande, R., & Topalova, P. (2011). Political reservation and substantive representation: Evidence form Indian Village Councils. In S. Bery, B. Bosworth & A. Panagariya (Eds.), India Policy Forum 2010-2011. Brookings Institution Press and the National Council of Applied Economic Research: Washington, D.C. and New Delhi.

Politics as a male domain and empowerment in India

Beaman, L., Pande, R., & Cirone, A. (2011). Politics as a male domain and empowerment in India. In S. Francheschet, M.L. Krook, & J.M. Piscopo (Eds.), The impact of gender quotas. New York: Springer

Untapped potential in the study of negotiation and gender inequality in organizations

Bowles, H. R., & McGinn, K. L. (August 01, 2008). Chapter 2: Untapped Potential in the Study of Negotiation and Gender Inequality in Organizations. Academy of Management Annals, 2, 1.)

Whatever happened to the ERA?

Mansbridge, J. (2003). Whatever happened to the ERA? In S. Schwarzenbach & P. Smith (Eds.), Women and the United States constitution: History, interpretation, and practice (365-378). New York: Columbia University Press.

Wombfare: The religious basis of fertility politics

Toft, M. (2011). Wombfare: The religious basis of fertility politics. In J.A. Goldstone, E. Kauffman, & M.D. Toft (Eds.), Political demography: Identity, institutions, and conflict. Boulder, CO: Paradigm Publishers.

Writing as a Democrat and a Feminist 

Mansbridge, J. (2003). Writing as a Democrat and a feminist. In B. Glassner & R. Hertz (Eds.), Our studies, ourselves: Sociologists’ lives and work (127-138). New York: Oxford University Press.
 
 
By Rohini Pande and Deanna Ford. Background Paper for the World Development Report 2012.
 
 
 
Financial Times, November 26, 2011.
 
 
By Iris Bohnet. Financial Times, October 13, 2010.

"Microcredit is not the Enemy." 
 
By Rohini Pande et al. Financial Times, December 12, 2010.

“Can Political Affirmative Action for Women Reduce Gender Bias?” 
 
By Rohini Pande et al. Vox, January 8, 2009.

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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Summer Fellowship Program

The Women and Public Policy Program provides stipends for summer internships that focus on closing gender gaps across the globe. Over the past decade the Women and Public Policy Program has enabled Harvard graduate students to complement their academic work with field experience in the US and internationally. WAPPP offers up to $6,500 for students to work in the field for a minimum of eight weeks on gender-focused projects and research.
 
 
From Harvard Square to the Oval Office: A Political Campaign Practicum (Oval Office) is a non-partisan initiative of the Women and Public Policy Program that provides a select group of Harvard graduate students with the training and support they need to ascend in the electoral process at the local, state and national levels. Our students form a robust network of women in government who support each other as they advance their careers. We believe that providing these tools and building a supportive network within the ranks of professional politics are necessary steps in correcting the large scale gender imbalance in the United States' government.

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Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice

Volume 16, Number 1, March 2004

Symposium: Women, Human Security
and Globalization

Special Editor: Linda Basch, National Council for Research on Women

Contents:

Linda Basch, Human Security, Globalization, and Feminist Visions
Mary Robinson, An Ethical, Human-Rights Approach to Globalization
Kristen Timothy, Human Security Discourse at the United Nations
Sadako Ogata, The Human Security Commission's Strategy
Charlotte Bunch, A Feminist Human Rights Lens
Sakiko Fukuda-Parr, Gender, Globalization and New Threats to Human Security
J. Ann Tickner, Feminist Responses to International Security Studies
Deborah L. Rhode, Gender and the U.S. Human Rights Record
Leith Mullings, Domestic Policy and Human Security in the U.S.
Gwyn Kirk and Margo Okazawa-Rey, Women Opposing U.S. Militarism in East Asia
Sally L. Kitch and Margaret A. Mills, Appropriating Women's Agendas

Teaser: 

Symposium: Women, Human Security and Globalization

Cover Image: 

Women in Fund Management: A Road Map for Achieving Critical Mass — and Why it Matters

For more than a quarter century, the National Council for Research on Women, now Re:Gender, has promoted the advancement of women and girls and highlighted the benefits of women’s participation, active engagement and leadership in decision-making. In this project, the Council brings this same lens to the historically male-dominated spaces of fund management and the financial services more broadly.

Our report, Women in Fund Management: A Road Map for Achieving Critical Mass – and Why it Matters, explores the under-representation of women in the field, draws on research suggesting the benefits women can bring, and lays out concrete action steps for change. Specifically, we call on the financial services industry to develop a “critical mass principle” with quantifiable benchmarks and guidelines for increasing the number of women at all leadership levels.

Teaser: 

For more than a quarter century, the National Council for Research on Women, now Re:Gender, has promoted the advancement of women and girls and highlighted the benefits of women’s participation, active engagement and leadership in decision-making. In this project, the Council brings this same lens to the historically male-dominated spaces of fund management and the financial services more broadly.

Cover Image: 
Attachment: 
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