Employment & Unemployment

Women continue to lag behind men in earnings and wages. The underlying reasons for these continuing disparities are cultural, social and economic. While unemployment rates for women have declined less for women than for men during the recent economic downturn, women are still apt to have lower-paying jobs, with fewer benefits, and more part-time and interrupted careers. As the jobless rate for men rises, women are increasingly becoming primary breadwinners for their families, often without increased access to child care, elder care and help with domestic chores and other key supports.

FAST FACT: Immigrant women made up approximately 12 percent of all women in the United States in 2008

December 17, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

The Migration Policy Institute just published a spotlight on immigrant women. It includes the latest data on labor force participation and socioeconomic status. Here’s a preview:

  • The 18.9 million immigrant women in the United States in 2008 made up approximately 12 percent of all women in the country.
  • While the majority of immigrant women had a high school degree or higher, they were less likely than immigrant men to have a bachelor's or advanced degree.
  • Nearly a third of immigrant female workers in fall 2009 were employed in service occupations

For many more stats as well as related articles, click here.

 


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Women Electricians Are Live Wires for a Labor Cause

December 15, 2009 posted by Francine Moccio*


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New Book on Women in the Trades by Jane LaTour

December 15, 2009 posted by admin


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Top Fund Managers of the Decade Nominees Reflect Scarcity of Women

December 14, 2009 Posted by Vivienne Heston-Demirel


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FAST FACT: Women and Poverty in the Nation's Capital

December 9, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

The DC Women's Agenda, a program of Wider Opportunities for Women, recently released a gender analysis of the 2008 American Community Survey. They found that women remain in poverty even while working. Here are some of the stats they shared:

  • Women are eight times more likely to live in poverty than men in D.C.
  • Approximately 22% of women-headed households, working full or part time, live in poverty
  • Gender income disparities persist as men who worked full-time had an 8.5% increase in salary from 2007 to 2008 while their female counterparts had only a 2.3% increase.

To read the full report, click here.


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A “soft” approach to innovating science education

December 8, 2009 posted by Theresa Johnston

Originally posted December 7, 2009 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research


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National Women’s Business Council

The Economic Impact of Women-Owned Businesses in the United States, October 2009
The Center for Women’s Business Research, with support from the National Women’s Business Council and Walmart, undertook a study to establish the economic impact of women-owned businesses on the U.S. economy. This study provides a clear picture of the value and impact of this segment to the economy and a roadmap for the future.
 

URL: 
http://www.nwbc.gov/ResearchPublications/documents/EconomicImpactReport.pdf

The Shriver Report: Executive Summary

For the first time in our nation’s history, women are half of all U.S. workers and mothers are the primary breadwinners or co-breadwinners in nearly two-thirds of American families. This is a dramatic shift from just a generation ago (in 1967 women made up only one-third of all workers).
 

URL: 
http://www.awomansnation.com/execSum.php

Motherhood penalty remains a pervasive problem in the workplace

December 1, 2009 posted by Ruth Schechter

Originally posted November 22, 2009 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Mothers looking for employment are less likely to be hired, are offered lower salaries and are perceived as being less committed to a job than fathers or women without children, according to a recent study of gender inequality in the workplace. What’s more, the pay gap between mothers and childless women is actually bigger than the pay gap between women and men.


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Women and Work: Feminists in Solidarity with Domestic Workers

Documentary featuring women leaders from across the United States who are raising their voices in support of efforts geared towards doemstic workers in the United States. Participants include: Carol Jenkins, Maria Hinojosa, Liz Azbug, Nicole Mason, Amy Richards, Barbara Smith, Gloria Steinem, Yolanda Wu, Jennifer Baumgardner, and the Guerrilla Girls.

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