Poverty

Women are more likely to be poor than men, both in the United States and across the globe. Female-headed households are more liable to live in poverty. Families headed by single women in the US are more than twice as likely as other families to be poor. The poverty divide is even more dramatic for people of color: in the US, African-American (26.5 percent) and Latina women (23.6 percent) register much higher poverty rates than white women (11.6 percent). Evidence-based, research-driven policies and programs that recognize the diverse realities of poverty and attack its root causes are critical for producing change.

'Kembe Fen' -- Stand Firm in Solidarity with Haiti

January 25, 2010 posted by Linda Basch

Over a week has passed since the earthquake in Haiti shook the world. Our hearts go out to the people of Haiti and those who have gone to help in relief efforts. We learn with sadness about the many lives lost, including key players in the Haitian women's movement. Experts are uniting behind the idea that the most effective way to help presently is to donate money.

Many members of the National Council for Research on Women network are involved in various humanitarian efforts in Haiti. Of particular concern is the gender dimension and ensuring that women and children's specific needs are not overlooked or undervalued.

Below is news about some efforts under way in sending both relief and funds to the people of Haiti. We are concerned with efforts to address the present dire situation, but also with those directed toward rebuilding the country's infrastructure and institutions. I hope you find this useful.


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Earthquake in Haiti: Time for Seismic and Systemic Change

January 15, 2010 posted by Linda Basch

As reports filter in from Haiti in the aftermath of Wednesday's catastrophic earthquake, it is difficult to process the sheer immensity of this tragedy. My thoughts go to the tens of thousands of grieving and displaced who are struggling with unimaginable loss. I am also thinking about the hundreds, maybe thousands of colleagues, advocates and humanitarian workers who have sacrificed their lives while trying to rebuild a nation ravaged by hurricane, poverty and continuing mismanagement. The UN mission in Port au Prince is still missing more than 100 staff members and countless schools, clinics and businesses have been destroyed.

I won't go into the long and turbulent history of Haiti's past: revolt against slavery, independence, colonialism, dictatorship, fragile democracy and the US's troubling role in this tested nation's myriad challenges.


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FAST FACT: How the Safety Net is Failing Americans

January 12, 2010 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird


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FAST FACT: Women and Poverty in the Nation's Capital

December 9, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

The DC Women's Agenda, a program of Wider Opportunities for Women, recently released a gender analysis of the 2008 American Community Survey. They found that women remain in poverty even while working. Here are some of the stats they shared:

  • Women are eight times more likely to live in poverty than men in D.C.
  • Approximately 22% of women-headed households, working full or part time, live in poverty
  • Gender income disparities persist as men who worked full-time had an 8.5% increase in salary from 2007 to 2008 while their female counterparts had only a 2.3% increase.

To read the full report, click here.


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Josephine Ho: The Criminalization of Economic and Sexual Underclasses

An excerpt from a lecture delivered at "Towards a Vision of Sexual and Economic Justice," an event held on November 29, 2007 at Barnard College.

Video URL: 
Untitled
See video

Engendering Justice: Women, Prisons and Change

In the last decade, we have witnessed the population of incarcerated women increase to 400 percent. Building on this development, Rebecca Haimowitz reflects on the interlinkage between incarceration and issues such as race, class, education, national identity, and gender conformity. 

Video URL: 

NCRW Economic Recovery and Stimulus Project

The National Council for Research on Women Project on the Economic Recovery Act

Reinvesting in Women and Families: Developing an Economy for the Future

Teaser: 

In the midst of the current economic crisis—which is exacerbating previously existing disparities and inequalities in the United States—the Economic Reinvestment and Recovery Act [ARRA] offers an opportune moment to raise up public investment for all citizens and to make inroads in gender equality. Building on the Council’s commitment to initiatives that advance women’s economic well-being, this project aims to gain a better understanding of the impact of the Act on women and their families. Additionally, the project will identify the inequities in the Recovery Act’s allocation of resources and recommend ways to address any resulting disparities.

Reinvesting in Women and Families: Developing an Economy for the Future (Summit October 2010)

Economic Security Summit
October 8, 2010
 [BY INVITATION ONLY]

Sponsored By:

 

Project: CEW is working at the local level to increase welfare recipients' access to higher education

Project: CEW is working at the local level to increase welfare recipients' access to higher education, in collaboration with the Department of Human services, the county workforce development agency, area colleges and universities, and the Center for Civil Justice in Saginaw, MI.

URL: 
http://www.umich.edu/~cew/

Domestic violence, economic abuse, and implications of a program for building economic resources for low-income women: findings from interviews with participants in a women's economic action program

"Domestic violence, economic abuse, and implications of a program for building economic resources for low-income women: findings from interviews with participants in a women's economic action program," by Cynthia K. Sanders, St. Louis: Washington University, Center for Social Development, 2007

URL: 
http://genderstudies.boisestate.edu/
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