Poverty

Women are more likely to be poor than men, both in the United States and across the globe. Female-headed households are more liable to live in poverty. Families headed by single women in the US are more than twice as likely as other families to be poor. The poverty divide is even more dramatic for people of color: in the US, African-American (26.5 percent) and Latina women (23.6 percent) register much higher poverty rates than white women (11.6 percent). Evidence-based, research-driven policies and programs that recognize the diverse realities of poverty and attack its root causes are critical for producing change.

Paid Sick Days in New York City Would Lower Health Care Costs by Reducing Unnecessary Emergency Department Visits

 In New York City, 50 percent of working New Yorkers, or approximately 1,580,000 employees, lack access to paid sick days. This fact sheet reports findings from research by the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) on how increased access to paid sick days would improve both access to health care and health outcomes in New York City. The research also quantifies the savings gained by providing access to paid sick days to all workers, thereby preventing some emergency department visits in New York City.

by Kevin Miller, Ph.D., Claudia Williams (February 2012)

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/paid-sick-days-in-new-york-city-would-lower-health-care-costs-by-reducing-unnecessary-emergency-department-visits

Tipped Over the Edge - Gender Inequity in the Restaurant Industry

 The report shows that women who work in the industry face systematic discrimination, poverty wages, a lack of sick days, and five times more harassment than the general female workforce. One major cause of poverty for these working women is that restaurant lobbyists have succeeded in keeping the federal minimum wage for servers and other tipped workers frozen at only $2.13 per hour for the past 20 years.

URL: 
http://rocunited.org/blog/tipped-over-the-edge-gender-inequity-in-the-restaurant-industry/

Low Literacy Means Lower Earnings, Especially for Women

 Appropriate literacy levels are crucial for both men and women seeking education and employment opportunities, but low literacy skills disproportionally hurt women’s chances of earning a sustaining wage.

by Jennifer Herard, Kevin Miller, Ph.D., Jane M. Henrici, Ph.D., Barbara Gault, Ph.D. (February 2012)

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/low-literacy-means-lower-earnings-especially-for-women

CFED Assets & Opportunities Scorecard

 By any measure, poverty in the United States is increasing. In 2010, the country saw the poverty rate for individuals rise to 15.1 percent, the highest level in nearly two decades. More than 46 million people now live below the federal poverty line of $22,350 for a family of four. However, the official poverty rate released annually by the Census Bureau highlights just one aspect of household finances, namely the percentage of people with insufficient income to cover their day-to-day expenses. It does not count the number of families who have insufficient resources – money in the bank or assets such as a home or a car – to meet emergencies or longer-term needs. When these longer-term needs are factored in, substantially more people in the United States today are facing a future of limited hope for long-term financial security.

URL: 
http://assetsandopportunity.org/scorecard/about/main_findings/

Measuring the Gender Asset Gap in Ghana

 There is an increasing recognition that the ownership of, access to and control over assets constitute a critical element in the determination of the well-being of households and individuals. Owing largely to data constraints, however, there has been a tendency for studies on assets and well-being/poverty to use the household as the unit of analysis. Such an approach tends to ignore the importance of intra-household disparities in asset ownership and well-being. Moreover, the dearth of individual-level data on asset ownership makes it extremely difficult to analyze gender disparities in asset ownership, wealth and well-being. As rightly noted by Grown et al. (2005), this lack of data seriously hampers efforts to track the progress of countries toward the Millennium Development Goal of gender equality and women’s empowerment.

URL: 
http://genderassetgap.iimb.ernet.in/articles/project-publications
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