Poverty

Women are more likely to be poor than men, both in the United States and across the globe. Female-headed households are more liable to live in poverty. Families headed by single women in the US are more than twice as likely as other families to be poor. The poverty divide is even more dramatic for people of color: in the US, African-American (26.5 percent) and Latina women (23.6 percent) register much higher poverty rates than white women (11.6 percent). Evidence-based, research-driven policies and programs that recognize the diverse realities of poverty and attack its root causes are critical for producing change.

Gender Pay Differences: Progress Made, but Women Remain Overrepresented among Low-Wage Workers

Women represent an increasingly larger share of the total workforce in the United States--constituting nearly half of the total workforce. In addition, an increasing proportion of women in the workforce are more educated. However, research by GAO and others has shown that women's average pay has been and remains lower than that of men. Questions have been raised about the extent to which less-advantaged women--that is, those who are low wage or less educated--experience lower wages than less-advantaged men. GAO was asked to examine the differences in representation, key characteristics, and pay among women and men (1) with less education and (2) with low wages. GAO defined less-educated workers as those having a high school degree or less and low-wage workers as those earning an hourly wage rate in the bottom quintile--or 20 percent--of wages across the workforce.
URL: 
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-12-10

Legal Aid is a Lifeline

The National Federation of Women's Institutes (UK) launches a report into violence against women and legal aid to coincide with the report stage of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill (31 October). Throughout the report, victims of domestic violence reiterate how access to legal aid secured their safety and protection in often life-threatening circumstances.

URL: 
http://www.thewi.org.uk/standard.aspx?id=23519

Can Economic Empowerment Reduce Vulnerability of Girls and Young Women to HIV?

In April 2010, the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW), with support from the Nike Foundation, convened an expert meeting of researchers, program implementers, policymakers and donors to explore emerging insights into the linkages between economic empowerment and HIV outcomes for girls and young women.
URL: 
http://www.icrw.org/publications/can-economic-empowerment-reduce-vulnerability-girls-and-young-women-hiv

Plan for a New Future: The Impact of Social Security Reform on People of Color

The Social Security Act was passed in 1935 to solve a pressing problem: how to alleviate poverty among those who contributed a lifetime of labor to the U.S. economy but who, through no fault of their own, could no longer work. The program’s early years focused on providing assistance to the elderly and their spouses. Later, eligibility was extended to dependents of deceased workers and to people who could no longer work due to long-term disability. Since its beginnings, Social Security has proven to be one of the most enduring and effective means of protecting vulnerable people from poverty while giving them dignity and a measure of economic security.

URL: 
http://www.globalpolicysolutions.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=129

Women and Men Living on the Edge: Economic Insecurity After the Great Recession

The IWPR/Rockefeller Survey of Economic Security, like several other recent surveys, finds that the effects of the 2007–2009 recession, known as the Great Recession, are both broad and deep. The IWPR/Rockefeller survey shows that more than one and a half years after the recession came to an official end, and the recovery supposedly began, many women and men report that they are still suffering significant hardships. They are having difficulty paying for basics like food (26 million women and 15 million men), health care (46 million women and 34 million men), rent or mortgage (32 million women and 25 million men), transportation (37 million women and 28 million men), utility bills (41 million women and 27 million men), and they have difficulty saving for the future (65 million women and 53 million men). On almost every measure of insecurity and hardship the survey reveals the Great Recession has visited more hardship on women than it has on men.

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/women-and-men-living-on-the-edge-economic-insecurity-after-the-great-recession

Retirement on the Edge: Women, Men, and Economic Insecurity After the Great Recession

The Great Recession dramatically altered the lives of many Americans, creating pronounced economic stress and uncertainty for both individuals and families. Even after the recession was officially declared over, unemployment levels remained persistently high, while housing values remained notably low. These circumstances led the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) to develop and analyze the IWPR/Rockefeller Survey of Economic Security, which was administered to 2,746 adults aged 18 and older between September and November 2010. The sample for the survey was stratified to yield approximately equal numbers of white, black, and Hispanic respondents, with results weighted by American Community Survey data to reflect the non-institutional, adult population of the nation.
URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/retirement-on-the-edge-women-men-and-economic-insecurity-after-the-great-recession/
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