Safety Nets

Women in the United States frequently lack basic services that are taken for granted in many other parts of the world. To be able to live in economic security, they require educational opportunities; paid sick leave; affordable, quality child care and elder care; as well as portable health care and adequate retirement benefits to protect them throughout their lives. While programs such as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Food Stamps are available, they do not go far enough. More robust safety nets are needed to lift and keep women and their families out of poverty.

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Looking to Women in America for Solutions

*By Kate Meyer

Last week Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Obama and Chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls, and Preeta Bansal, General Counsel and Senior Policy Advisor in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, hosted a White House Webchat to highlight findings from the recently released report Women in America: Indicators of Social and Economic Well-Being. Here at NCRW we were thrilled to see Jarrett and Bansal advocating for the same policies and programs that are on our agenda.


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Poverty Measurements Need a Facelift

By Carrie Wolfson*

Tuesday, March 29, proved to be an important day for advancing our understanding of poverty, with two unaffiliated events tackling different aspects of this important issue. The Women of Color Policy Network, in conjunction with the Center for American Progress, hosted an event to discuss the measurement of poverty and poverty reduction programs within the U.S. Just one hour later, Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity led an audioconference to discuss lessons that U.S. policymakers can learn from the U.K. on reducing childhood poverty.


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Shyama Venkateswar: status report on women and economic security (94.9 FM Hudson Valley)

March is International Women’s Month! Our special guest for the March 22nd broadcast is Shyama Venkateswar, Director of Research and Programs for the National Council for Research on Women (NCRW).   We’ll discuss the work of NCRW and the perils women around the world are facing.  Economic struggles, education and health care are topics we will explore as we seek answers on how to improve the lives of women and girls. Tuesday, March 22th at 9 PM Eastern, 6pm Pacific to www.party934.com, 94.9 FM Hudson Valley, NY to listen to Shyama Venkateswar of NCRW.  We will also broadcast special selections of international music from women recording artists around the world.
Visit host Lyn Twyman’s site at http://www.lyntwyman.com/
 

About Shyama Venkateswar and NCRW

Joining Forces for Women Veterans

Joining Forces for Women Veterans

URL: 
http://www.bpwfoundation.org/documents/uploads/JFWV_Final_Summit_Report.pdf

House Republican Spending Cuts in H.R. 1 Devastating To Women, Families and the Economy

The bill to fund – and de-fund – the federal government for the remainder of fiscal year 2011, H.R. 1, passed the House on February 19, 2011, on a party-line vote (all but three Republicans voting voted for the bill; all Democrats voting voted against it). The bill slashes funding for services vital to women and girls at every stage in their lives, from early childhood to K-12, through their working and childbearing years, and into old age. In addition, the bill prohibits the federal government from enforcing important legal protections for women.

To find out more about how H.R. 1 affects women and families, read the National Women's Law Center's Fact Sheet.

URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/hr1factsheetfeb2011_2.pdf
Member Organization: 

Anti-Union Efforts and Wisconsin's Women Workers

By Kate Meyer*


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Early Childhood Funding at Risk

Yesterday, the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) convened a call with the National Women's Law Center, National Association for the Education of Young Children, and First Five Years Fund.  The purpose of the call was to raise awareness about the current precarious position of early childhood funding. 


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