Safety Nets

Women in the United States frequently lack basic services that are taken for granted in many other parts of the world. To be able to live in economic security, they require educational opportunities; paid sick leave; affordable, quality child care and elder care; as well as portable health care and adequate retirement benefits to protect them throughout their lives. While programs such as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Food Stamps are available, they do not go far enough. More robust safety nets are needed to lift and keep women and their families out of poverty.

A Brief History of the Women's Donor Activist Movement

This video was inspired by historian Dr. Sally Roesch Wagner who brilliantly determined to preserve and document the writings of suffragist Matilda Joslyn Gage. In the 19th century, Gage complained that women of means funded their husbands' alma maters, churches and the ballet, but rarely stepped forward to fund their suffragette sisters. Imagine how different the world would be today if women had begun funding women sooner! This fast-moving video shows how today's women's funding movement, and new giving trends like Women Moving Millions, are literally changing the course of history. Video produced for The Sister Fund by Chicken & Egg Pictures, The Matilda Joslyn Gage Foundation and Great Plains Productions.

 


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Policy Is About Priority: Where Do Moms Fit in?

By Rylee Sommers-Flanagan*

This post originally appeared on the Health Justice Blog associated with the Health Justice Division of the New York Lawyers for the Public Interest.


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The Intersection of Race, Gender and Wealth: Why Disparities Matter

On March 8, 2010 NCRW Director of Research and Programs, Shyama Venkatewar, was invited to speak at a special policy discussion in honor of International Women's Day.  Hosted by The Insight Center for Community Economic Development, the Institute for Women's Policy Research, the National Council of Negro Women, the Women of Color Policy Network at NYU, and the National Council for Research on Women, the day focused on Economic Security for Women--how wealth building for women of color is a strategy for long-term economic recovery.  Dr.

Wealth to Health: How it’s All Connected

By Rylee Sommers-Flanagan*

Earlier this week, my fellow intern, Courtney Fiske, reported on the findings released last month by the Institute on Assets and Social Policy at Brandeis University, which revealed a widening racial wealth gap between whites and blacks in the United States.


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Ms. Foundation Hosts Successful Capitol Hill Briefing on the Recession

Last week, the Ms. Foundation for Women--in partnership with the Center for Community Change and Lake Research Partners--hosted a successful Capitol Hill briefing, sharing results from their recent poll on the impact of the recession on women.  According to Gail Cohen from the Joint Economic Committee,

only in May did women gain almost the same number of jobs as men -- but only in temporary Census jobs. In the private sector in May, women lost 1000 jobs while men gained 42,000 jobs.

To learn more about the briefing and download results of the poll, visit the Ms. Foundation's blog, Igniting Change.

 

 


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Yes, Virginia, the Recession Really Has Hurt Women

Hands down, this post from California NOW recieves the award for best title of a blog addressing the gloomy issue of the economic recession.  The post discusses a briefing hosted by the California Budget Project, which challenged this whole idea of a "mancession."  California NOW pulled out these (un)savory data points from the briefing:

  • The number of families supported solely by working mothers rose from 4.7% in 2006 to 8.5% in 2009.
  • California’s typical working woman earned 89.1 cents for every dollar earned by the typical working man in 2009.
     

 


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Bridging the Racial Wealth Gap

By Courtney A. Fiske*

The gap between the personal wealth of white and black Americans undergirds socioeconomic inequality in the United States. What’s more, it’s widening.

This fact served as the springboard for an online seminar hosted last Thursday by the Insight Center for Community Economic Development. Entitled “Social Security at 75,” the discussion probed the intersections between race, wealth (defined as earnings minus expenditures), and economic security.


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New York Domestic Workers Bill of Rights Takes One Giant Step Forward

This week, New York moved one step closer to becoming the first state to enact a Domestic Workers Bill of Rights. Here's what the Ms. Foundation has to say about it:

The bill, which would guarantee domestic workers basic workplace rights like paid vacation and sick days, overtime pay, and at least one day off per week, was passed by the New York State Senate by a vote of 33-28. Though the legislation still has to be reconciled with an earlier version that was passed by the Assembly last year, and then signed into law by Governor Paterson, yesterday's vote in the bill's favor was a historic achievement, setting the stage for the passage of similar bills in states like California and Colorado.


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