Safety Nets

Women in the United States frequently lack basic services that are taken for granted in many other parts of the world. To be able to live in economic security, they require educational opportunities; paid sick leave; affordable, quality child care and elder care; as well as portable health care and adequate retirement benefits to protect them throughout their lives. While programs such as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Food Stamps are available, they do not go far enough. More robust safety nets are needed to lift and keep women and their families out of poverty.

Race, Gender and Economic Justice in the U.S.

March 9, 2010 posted by Jacqueline Mumbey*

This afternoon, NCRW co-sponsored a CSW side event with the Center for Women’s Global Leadership, The Opportunity Agenda, and the Human Rights Project of the Urban Justice Center. The discussion sought to give a “face” to the current debates on the economic crisis.


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Women’s Equality Key to Economic Recovery

March 8, 2010 posted by Shyama Venkateswar

Today as we celebrate International Women’s Day all over the world, let us take a moment to reflect on how much more needs to be done for us to claim true gender equity even within the United States. The economic crisis or our Great Recession is unprecedented in terms of its global reach and its impact on governments, corporations and individuals alike. What this crisis has also done is profoundly demonstrate the existing disparities and inequalities within the United States.

Consider the following pieces of data:


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A Women's Agenda for Job Creation

Many unemployed workers are women whose different needs in finding work are being ignored.

URL: 
http://www.wowonline.org/documents/Womensjobsagenda_december2009.pdf

Wealth Creation and a Stronger Economy Through Robust Safety Nets

Head on over to AlterNet to see our latest op-ed by NCRW Director of Research and Programs, Shyama Venkateswar. In "Women of Color Slammed by Economic Crisis--We Must Strengthen Basic Safety Nets," Shyama argues that we must build our economy from the bottom up by strenthening basic safety nets. She says,


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Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
40° 46' 27.4332" N, 73° 57' 26.244" W

Mimi Abramovitz is the CHAIR of Social Welfare Policy at Hunter College School of Social Work, and serves as the Bertha Capen Reynolds Professor of Social Work and Social Policy. Professor Abramovitz academic interests include poverty in the United States, race and social welfare policy, low income women's activism, class race and gender, the impact of neoliberalism on the welfare state, and the history of the US welfare state. Books she has recently published include Under Attack, Fighting Back: Women and Welfare in the United States, NY: Monthly Review Press, (2nd rev Ed), 2009 and The Dynamics of Social Welfare Policy, NY: Oxford University Press (w/ Joel Blau) (2nd rev ed), 2007.  Scholarly articles that Professor Abramovitz has recently published are “Wall St Takes Welfare It Begrudges Women.

Location

New York, NY 10075
United States
40° 46' 27.4332" N, 73° 57' 26.244" W

ARRA and the Economic Crisis: One Year Later (2010)

Has stimulus helped communities in crisis?

URL: 
http://4909e99d35cada63e7f757471b7243be73e53e14.gripelements.com/publications/arraequityoneyearanniv_kirwan_institute_feb2010.pdf

ECONOMIC RECOVERY ACT FORUM: Taking the Nation’s Temperature One Year After ARRA’s Passage

By Linda Basch*

Today marks the one-year anniversary of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). In its first year, ARRA has provided tax cuts to individuals, fiscal relief to states, and aid to those most directly hurt by the recession. According to the Council of Economic Advisors, the Recovery Act has added around 2.3% to real GDP growth and in August, it added one million jobs that would have been lost without the Recovery Act. That said, the national unemployment rate currently stands at an unacceptable 9.7% (which many experts say is a conservatively low estimate).


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