Safety Nets

Women in the United States frequently lack basic services that are taken for granted in many other parts of the world. To be able to live in economic security, they require educational opportunities; paid sick leave; affordable, quality child care and elder care; as well as portable health care and adequate retirement benefits to protect them throughout their lives. While programs such as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Food Stamps are available, they do not go far enough. More robust safety nets are needed to lift and keep women and their families out of poverty.

NCRW Fact Sheet: Women and Poverty

Lifting women and children out of poverty is key to women’s economic security and wellbeing.

Attachment: 

NCRW Fact Sheet: Affordable Child Care Needed as Women's Labor Force Participation Grows

Making childcare affordable is critical to working families and key to women’s economic well-being and success, particularly
during times of economic recession. Studies demonstrate that childcare enables women to stay employed longer and establish greater work-life balance.

Attachment: 

NCRW Fact Sheet: Guaranteed Paid Leave--A National Imperative for Women and Families

The lack of guaranteed paid leave creates economic hardship for the U.S. labor force as well as increased costs to businesses. Without paid sick days, workers face wage or job loss in cases of illness or health emergency. Since women continue to be primary caregivers, the absence of paid sick leave disproportionately affects them. Guaranteeing paid leave is critical to women’s economic security and well-being.

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
40° 42' 17.2368" N, 74° 0' 26.0784" W

Kyla Bender-Baird, Research and Programs Manager, is providing the Council with a wide range of research and communications support. She received a BA in Sociology from Principia College and an MS in Women’s Studies from Towson University. Her thesis focused on transgender experiences of employment discrimination. During her time at Towson University, Kyla was a graduate assistant with the Institute for Teaching and Research on Women. On completion of her master’s degree, Kyla served as a Vaid Fellow with the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Policy Institute. Kyla first joined the Council as a research consultant for The Big Five initiative. She has interned previously with Planned Parenthood and the Gender Public Advocacy Coalition.

Location

New York, NY 10005
United States
40° 42' 17.2368" N, 74° 0' 26.0784" W

Stanford Researcher Urges Universities, Businesses to Offer Benefit To Pay For Housework

Member Organization: 
Clayman Institute for Gender Research

by Adam Gorlick on 01/19/10

Originally posted in the Stanford Report January 19, 2010

Professor Londa SchiebingerLonda Schiebinger’s study shows academic scientists spend about 19 hours a week on basic household chores. If universities offered a benefit to pay someone else to do that work, scientists would have more time to spend on the jobs they’re trained for, she says.

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
40° 42' 51.3684" N, 74° 0' 21.5028" W
Member Organizations: 

Leslye E. Orloff is vice president and director of Legal Momentum's Immigrant Women Program. She joined Legal Momentum's Washington, D.C. office in September 1999 to found and direct the Immigrant Women Program (IWP) which advocates for laws, policies and practices that enhance the legal rights of immigrant women and immigrant victims of violence against women. IWP focuses on improved access to immigration benefits, the justice system, public benefits, social services and health care.

Location

New York, NY
United States
40° 42' 51.3684" N, 74° 0' 21.5028" W

FAST FACT: The rich get richer…

January 25, 2010 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

Ever since my sophomore year of college, when I took “Social, Class, and Power,” I’ve had the refrain “the rich get richer while the poor get poorer” stuck in my head. Today’s report released by the Center for American Progress and Center for WorkLife Law at Hastings College of Law gave me the facts behind this refrain.

Since 1979, the median annual income of the bottom third of American families has decreased by 29% while the top third experienced a 7% increase in their median income. The middle third’s median annual income decreased 13%.


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Stanford researcher urges universities, businesses to offer benefit to pay for housework

January 20, 2010 posted by admin

Originally posted by Adam Gorlick January 19, 2010 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Londa Schiebinger’s study shows academic scientists spend about 19 hours a week on basic household chores. If universities offered a benefit to pay someone else to do that work, scientists would have more time to spend on the jobs they’re trained for, she says.


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FAST FACT: How the Safety Net is Failing Americans

January 12, 2010 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird


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