Safety Nets

Women in the United States frequently lack basic services that are taken for granted in many other parts of the world. To be able to live in economic security, they require educational opportunities; paid sick leave; affordable, quality child care and elder care; as well as portable health care and adequate retirement benefits to protect them throughout their lives. While programs such as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Food Stamps are available, they do not go far enough. More robust safety nets are needed to lift and keep women and their families out of poverty.

Rebuilding Hope: Polyclinic of Hope Care and Treatment Project A Holistic Approach for HIV-Positive Women Survivors of the Rwandan Genocide

The Polyclinic of Hope in Rwanda takes a comprehensive approach to combating gender-based violence for genocide survivors affected by HIV by facilitating support groups, encouraging income generation activities and providing HIV testing and treatment services.

This case study was prepared by the AIDSTAR-One project. As an AIDSTAR-One partner organization, ICRW provided technical oversight on this publication. The full case studies series and findings are available at AIDSTAR-One.
 
Saranga Jain, Margaret Greene, Zayid Douglas, Myra Betron, and Katherine Fritz
2011

 

URL: 
http://www.icrw.org/publications/rebuilding-hope-polyclinic-hope-care-and-treatment-project

Paid Sick Days in New York City Would Lower Health Care Costs by Reducing Unnecessary Emergency Department Visits

 In New York City, 50 percent of working New Yorkers, or approximately 1,580,000 employees, lack access to paid sick days. This fact sheet reports findings from research by the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) on how increased access to paid sick days would improve both access to health care and health outcomes in New York City. The research also quantifies the savings gained by providing access to paid sick days to all workers, thereby preventing some emergency department visits in New York City.

by Kevin Miller, Ph.D., Claudia Williams (February 2012)

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/paid-sick-days-in-new-york-city-would-lower-health-care-costs-by-reducing-unnecessary-emergency-department-visits

Fostering Equitable Foreclosure Recovery

 The foreclosure crisis, which began in 2006 and is ongoing, has left few communities untouched and has been particularly devastating for low-income communities and communities of color. By the time the crisis abates, 10 million homeowners will have lost their homes to foreclosure. Many of them will lose their standing in the middle class and suffer tremendous economic and personal losses.

 
URL: 
http://www.policylink.org/site/apps/nlnet/content2.aspx?c=lkIXLbMNJrE&b=5136581&ct=11622025

Can Boomer Women Afford to Retire?

Slideshow with 7 pages of graphs and tables.

 by Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D. (February 2012)

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/can-boomer-women-afford-to-retire

CFED Assets & Opportunities Scorecard

 By any measure, poverty in the United States is increasing. In 2010, the country saw the poverty rate for individuals rise to 15.1 percent, the highest level in nearly two decades. More than 46 million people now live below the federal poverty line of $22,350 for a family of four. However, the official poverty rate released annually by the Census Bureau highlights just one aspect of household finances, namely the percentage of people with insufficient income to cover their day-to-day expenses. It does not count the number of families who have insufficient resources – money in the bank or assets such as a home or a car – to meet emergencies or longer-term needs. When these longer-term needs are factored in, substantially more people in the United States today are facing a future of limited hope for long-term financial security.

URL: 
http://assetsandopportunity.org/scorecard/about/main_findings/
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