Housing

Inadequate income, lack of affordable housing and demanding caretaking responsibilities force many women to live in substandard housing. Domestic violence and poor credit ratings are other factors that undermine housing options for women and girls. The Sub-Prime mortgage crisis has hit low-income women and people of color particularly hard, with long-range implications for their housing opportunities. Affordable, accessible, quality housing is essential, not only for the economic security of women and their families but for their health and safety as well.

Fostering Equitable Foreclosure Recovery

 The foreclosure crisis, which began in 2006 and is ongoing, has left few communities untouched and has been particularly devastating for low-income communities and communities of color. By the time the crisis abates, 10 million homeowners will have lost their homes to foreclosure. Many of them will lose their standing in the middle class and suffer tremendous economic and personal losses.

 
URL: 
http://www.policylink.org/site/apps/nlnet/content2.aspx?c=lkIXLbMNJrE&b=5136581&ct=11622025

Foreclosures in New York: What's Really Going On?

 Four years into the mortgage meltdown, the home foreclosure crisis in New York State continues unabated, particularly in low income neighborhoods and communities of color.

Recent reports on foreclosures in New York cite a decline in foreclosure actions filed in New York courts. These reports, however, fail to include key information needed to understand the true foreclosure picture and formulate effective public policy.

URL: 
http://www.nedap.org/resources/documents/NEDAPForeclosuresinNYS_WhatsGoingOn.pdf

CFED Assets & Opportunities Scorecard

 By any measure, poverty in the United States is increasing. In 2010, the country saw the poverty rate for individuals rise to 15.1 percent, the highest level in nearly two decades. More than 46 million people now live below the federal poverty line of $22,350 for a family of four. However, the official poverty rate released annually by the Census Bureau highlights just one aspect of household finances, namely the percentage of people with insufficient income to cover their day-to-day expenses. It does not count the number of families who have insufficient resources – money in the bank or assets such as a home or a car – to meet emergencies or longer-term needs. When these longer-term needs are factored in, substantially more people in the United States today are facing a future of limited hope for long-term financial security.

URL: 
http://assetsandopportunity.org/scorecard/about/main_findings/

Measuring the Gender Asset Gap in Ghana

 There is an increasing recognition that the ownership of, access to and control over assets constitute a critical element in the determination of the well-being of households and individuals. Owing largely to data constraints, however, there has been a tendency for studies on assets and well-being/poverty to use the household as the unit of analysis. Such an approach tends to ignore the importance of intra-household disparities in asset ownership and well-being. Moreover, the dearth of individual-level data on asset ownership makes it extremely difficult to analyze gender disparities in asset ownership, wealth and well-being. As rightly noted by Grown et al. (2005), this lack of data seriously hampers efforts to track the progress of countries toward the Millennium Development Goal of gender equality and women’s empowerment.

URL: 
http://genderassetgap.iimb.ernet.in/articles/project-publications

Discriminatory mortgage lending intensifies racial segregation

 On December 21, Bank of America settled a Justice Department complaint alleging racial discrimination in mortgage lending by its Countrywide subsidiary. But underlying issues are far from resolved. Longstanding federal inaction in the face of widespread discriminatory mortgage lending practices helped create, and since has perpetuated, racially segregated, impoverished neighborhoods. This history of “law-sanctioned” racial segregation has had many damaging effects, including poor educational outcomes for minority children.

URL: 
http://www.epi.org/blog/bank-of-america-countrywide-discriminatory-mortgage-lending/

Joining Forces for Women Veterans

Joining Forces for Women Veterans

URL: 
http://www.bpwfoundation.org/documents/uploads/JFWV_Final_Summit_Report.pdf

House Republican Spending Cuts in H.R. 1 Devastating To Women, Families and the Economy

The bill to fund – and de-fund – the federal government for the remainder of fiscal year 2011, H.R. 1, passed the House on February 19, 2011, on a party-line vote (all but three Republicans voting voted for the bill; all Democrats voting voted against it). The bill slashes funding for services vital to women and girls at every stage in their lives, from early childhood to K-12, through their working and childbearing years, and into old age. In addition, the bill prohibits the federal government from enforcing important legal protections for women.

To find out more about how H.R. 1 affects women and families, read the National Women's Law Center's Fact Sheet.

URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/hr1factsheetfeb2011_2.pdf
Syndicate content