Work - Life Balance

Women [and men] today are seeking greater flexibility in their jobs to balance more effectively their work and family responsibilities. Lack of such arrangements often forces women to opt out of pursuing their career goals. When they return to work, women find themselves at a disadvantage in terms of earnings, opportunities and promotions. Employers who adopt more flexibility in the workplace allow women and men to lead more productive and effective lives.

Maternity Leave and Employment Patterns of First-Time Mothers: 1961-2008

Half of First-Time Mothers Receive Paid Leave, Census Bureau Reports
 
Fifty-one percent of working women who had their first birth between 2006 and 2008 received paid leave (i.e. maternity leave, sick leave, vacation) compared with 42 percent between 1996 and 2000, according to a report released today by the U.S. Census Bureau.
 
This finding comes from Maternity Leave and Employment Patterns of First-Time Mothers: 1961-2008, a report that analyzes trends in women's work experience before their first child, identifies their maternity leave arrangements before and after the birth and examines how rapidly they returned to work.
 
"The last three decades have seen major changes in the work patterns of expectant mothers," said Lynda Laughlin, a family demographer at the Census Bureau.
URL: 
http://www.census.gov/prod/2011pubs/p70-128.pdf

Gender Pay Differences: Progress Made, but Women Remain Overrepresented among Low-Wage Workers

Women represent an increasingly larger share of the total workforce in the United States--constituting nearly half of the total workforce. In addition, an increasing proportion of women in the workforce are more educated. However, research by GAO and others has shown that women's average pay has been and remains lower than that of men. Questions have been raised about the extent to which less-advantaged women--that is, those who are low wage or less educated--experience lower wages than less-advantaged men. GAO was asked to examine the differences in representation, key characteristics, and pay among women and men (1) with less education and (2) with low wages. GAO defined less-educated workers as those having a high school degree or less and low-wage workers as those earning an hourly wage rate in the bottom quintile--or 20 percent--of wages across the workforce.
URL: 
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-12-10

Paid Sick Days in Denver Would Improve Health Outcomes, Reduce Racial/Ethnic Health Disparities, And Help Control Health Care Costs

In Denver, 41 percent of the private-sector workforce, or 107,407 workers, lack access to paid sick days. In the present research, the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) estimates the improvements in access to health care and health outcomes that Denver workers without paid sick days and their families would experience if they were to gain access to paid sick days.
 
by Claudia Williams, Kevin Miller, Ph.D. (October 2011)
 
URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/paid-sick-days-in-denver-would-improve-health-outcomes-reduce-racial-ethnic-health-disparities-and-help-control-health-care-costs

State Child Care Assistance Policies 2011: Reduced Support for Families in Challenging Times

The National Women's Law Center's 8th annual review of key child care subsidy policies in all fifty states and the District of Columbia reveals that families were worse off in 37 states than they were in 2010 under one or more child care assistance policies.  Families are not only worse off in 2011 than they were in 2010, but are also worse off than a decade ago. Families in only eleven states were better off under one or more child care policy areas than last year, a sharp contrast to NWLC’s findings in the previous year when families in thirty-four states were better off in 2010 than they were in 2009 and worse off in only fifteen states.
URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org/resource/state-child-care-assistance-policies-2011-reduced-support-families-challenging-times
Member Organization: 
Syndicate content