Work - Life Balance

Women [and men] today are seeking greater flexibility in their jobs to balance more effectively their work and family responsibilities. Lack of such arrangements often forces women to opt out of pursuing their career goals. When they return to work, women find themselves at a disadvantage in terms of earnings, opportunities and promotions. Employers who adopt more flexibility in the workplace allow women and men to lead more productive and effective lives.

The MetLife Study of Women, Retirement, and the Extra-Long Life

Though women experience extra-long lives and, therefore, face a number of unique risks in retirement — including aging single, lower annual retirement incomes, greater health care costs, and caregiving responsibilities — women have not planned adequately, leading to a significant gap between their retirement income security needs and their response to them. In conjunction with the study we have produced a "Woman on the Street" video where women express their opinions on retirement preparation.

Key Findings

 

URL: 
http://www.metlife.com/mmi/research/women-retirement-extra-long-life.html#findings

Who's Minding the Kids? Child Care Arrangements: Spring 2010: One-Third of Fathers with Working Wives Regularly Care for Their Children, Census Bureau Reports

Among fathers with a wife in the workforce, 32 percent were a regular source of care for their children under age 15, up from 26 percent in 2002, the U.S. Census Bureau reported today. Among these fathers with preschool-age children, one in five fathers was the primary caregiver, meaning their child spent more time in their care than any other type of arrangement.
 
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