Caregiving

Compared to men, women spend a disproportionate amount of time attending to the needs of children and adults under their care.. Because of caregiving demands, more than half of employed women caregivers have made special workplace arrangements, such as arriving late, leaving early or working fewer hours. Women represent 61 percent of all caregivers and 75 percent of caregivers who report feeling very strained emotionally, physically or financially by such responsibilities. Minor-aged women and girls also shoulder caregiving duties, usually unrecognized and uncompensated. Affordable, accessible, quality child care and elder care, as well as greater delegation of responsibilities to spouses and partners, are required to offset the overwhelming care loads within families and communities.

A Pregnancy Test for Schools: The Impact of Education Laws on Pregnant and Parenting Students

 Parenthood is not the end of the road for teen moms. Quite to the contrary, motherhood can serve as an educational motivator for many young women. Unfortunately, educational barriers and discrimination often thwart this drive and determination. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is the landmark law that bans sex discrimination in federally funded education programs and activities. Despite Title IX’s prohibition against sex discrimination, there are schools across the country that continue to bar pregnant and parenting students from activities, kick them out of school, pressure them to attend alternative programs, and penalize them for pregnancy-related absences.

URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org/reports-overview/pregnancy-test-schools-impact-education-laws-pregnant-and-parenting-students
Member Organization: 

Community College Partnerships for Student and Career Success: Program Profile of Carreras en Salud

Postsecondary students with children often need an array of supports to succeed in their studies, which can require significant coordination among new and existing services (Conway, Blair, and Helmer 2012; Henrici n.d.; Miller, Gault, and Thorman 2011). Such supports might include financial aid, academic and career counseling, job placement assistance, transportation, housing, child care, and classes in English-as-a-Second Language. To more effectively provide an expanded range of student resources, community colleges often partner with local nonprofits, private businesses and foundations, and government institutions (Altstadt 2011; Bragg et al. 2007; Bray, Painter, and Rosen 2011; Conway, Blair, and Helmer 2012; Leutz 2007; Singh 2007; Wilson 2010).

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/community-college-partnerships-for-student-and-career-success-program-profile-of-carreras-en-salud

Women and Alzheimer's Disease: The Caregiver's Crisis

 The Working Mother Research Institute surveyed nearly 2,500 women, including more than 1,200 who have cared for a loved one with Alzheimer's, to get a clear picture of how the responsibility of caregiving affects their emotional, financial and work lives, as well as their families.

URL: 
http://www.workingmother.com/research-institute/women-and-alzheimers-disease-caregivers-crisis

Money Across Generations II: Gender Differences

Women are engaging in more regular financial conversations with their families, but men may be more willing to reach for their wallets – at least for certain types of purchases. New findings from the Money Across Generations IISM study, released today by Ameriprise Financial, demonstrate significant differences in how American men and women approach money matters, especially those concerning their adult children and parents.
 
A vast majority (93%) of baby boomers say they’ve provided financial support to their adult children, but fathers are significantly more likely than mothers to have helped fund an automobile purchase (58% vs. 48%) or co-signed a loan or lease agreement (42% vs. 32%).
URL: 
http://newsroom.ameriprise.com/images/20018/MAG%20Research%20Report%20Gender%20Differences%206-8-12.pdf

Valuing Good Health in Massachusetts: The Costs and Benefits of Paid Sick Days (Executive Summary)

This report uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and the U.S. Census Bureau to evaluate the likely impact of the Massachusetts Act Establishing Earned Paid Sick Time. The study is one of a series of analyses by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) examining the costs and benefits of paid sick days policies. It estimates how much time off Massachusetts workers would use under the proposed policy and the costs to employers for that sick time. It also uses findings from previous peer-reviewed research to estimate how this leave policy would save money, by reducing turnover, cutting down on the spread of disease at work, helping employers avoid paying for low productivity, holding down nursing-home stays, and reducing norovirus outbreaks in nursing homes.

by Kevin Miller, Ph.D., Claudia Williams (May 2012)

 

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/valuing-good-health-in-massachusetts-the-costs-and-benefits-of-paid-sick-days-executive-summary
Syndicate content