Caregiving

Compared to men, women spend a disproportionate amount of time attending to the needs of children and adults under their care.. Because of caregiving demands, more than half of employed women caregivers have made special workplace arrangements, such as arriving late, leaving early or working fewer hours. Women represent 61 percent of all caregivers and 75 percent of caregivers who report feeling very strained emotionally, physically or financially by such responsibilities. Minor-aged women and girls also shoulder caregiving duties, usually unrecognized and uncompensated. Affordable, accessible, quality child care and elder care, as well as greater delegation of responsibilities to spouses and partners, are required to offset the overwhelming care loads within families and communities.

ELECTION 2010: Looking Past the Election to the Work that Lies Ahead

By Linda Basch and Shyama Venkateswar

November 2nd. Election Day 2010.  It’s days away and many are calling this the most unpredictable election they can remember.  Will this election be a game changer?  Will there be a new majority in Congress?  And will those teapartiers have an impact on voting behavior?  


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ELECTION 2010: Governor Schwarzenegger's Legacy--Successful “welfare to work” program to ineffective “work to welfare program”

By Mary Ignatius*

The lives of low-income working mothers and children are hanging in the balance with California Governor’s economically irresponsible and morally reprehensible line-item veto to eliminate the Stage 3 child care program.  Despite having a bi-partisan “hand shake deal” that would have protected child care subsidies, the Governor shocked the legislature by claiming the cuts were necessary to bolster up a “rainy day fund.”


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Understanding the Economy: Working Mothers in the Great Recession

The Great Recession has taken a huge toll on working families. The vast majority of jobs lost were lost by men, but a substantial number of jobs were lost by women during this recession. From December 2007 to April 2010, women lost 46 jobs for every 100 jobs lost by men. By comparison, during the 2001 recession, women lost 17 jobs for every 100 lost by men and women lost less then 2 jobs for every 100 jobs lost by men during the 1990s recession. 

Indeed, in recent months, women lost jobs while men gained jobs. From October 2009 to March 2010, women lost 22,000 jobs while men gained 260,000. Women's increased vulnerability to the business cycle has important repercussions for families' economic security. 

Teaser: 

This report provides an updated look at the employment situation of working mothers with children under 18 years old, and examines the impact of the recession on their participation in the labor market using unpublished data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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How the Other Half Fared: The Impact of the Great Recession on Women

The Great Recession was widely proclaimed to be a "mancession" because more than two out of three of the jobs lost during the downturn were jobs held by men. Yet the recession had a significant impact on women and their families as well. The Great Recession was the first in recent history in which women experienced substantial job loss. Women supporting families without the help of a spouse were hit particularly hard.

Teaser: 

The Great Recession was widely proclaimed to be a "mancession" because more than two out of three of the jobs lost during the downturn were jobs held by men. Yet the recession had a significant impact on women and their families as well. The Great Recession was the first in recent history in which women experienced substantial job loss. Women supporting families without the help of a spouse were hit particularly hard.

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The Female Face of Poverty and Economic Insecurity: The Impact of the Recession on Women in Pennsylvania and Pittsburgh MSA

Since the beginning of the recession at the end of 2007, unemployment has increased rapidly, in Pennsylvania as it has elsewhere. While many families suffer as a result of reduced earnings and unemployment, women who head households face significantly higher risks of unemployment than male head households, and are much more likely than men to live in poverty. Single mothers nationally have higher rates of unemployment than other women and men.

Policy action is required to ensure that women and their families are receiving adequate help during the current crisis, and that measures are put in place to help them reach and maintain economic self-sufficiency in the longer run.

To read the full report, click here.

Teaser: 

Since the beginning of the recession at the end of 2007, unemployment has increased rapidly, in Pennsylvania as it has elsewhere. While many families suffer as a result of reduced earnings and unemployment, women who head households face significantly higher risks of unemployment than male head households, and are much more likely than men to live in poverty. Single mothers nationally have higher rates of unemployment than other women and men.

Policy action is required to ensure that women and their families are receiving adequate help during the current crisis, and that measures are put in place to help them reach and maintain economic self-sufficiency in the longer run.

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Recession, Stimulus and the Child Care Sector: Understanding Economic Dynamics, Calculating Impact

 As part of the new Stimulus Bill (ARRA), states and localities may be required to show economic impact of the stimulus funds. This brief has been developed to help state policymakers calculate the stimulus effects of increased child care spending on output and employment in the state economy.

There are three important aspects of the child care sector which need to be counted when assessing economic impact: 1) direct employment and output in the child care sector itself, 2) multiplier effects of the sector in the broader regional economy, and 3) the social infrastructure role child care plays in supporting the parent workforce. All of these are short term economic effects. This report will address each of these aspects in turn and show how to calculate these effects using an example with data from the State of Kansas. But first we must understand the structure of the child care sector.

Teaser: 

This brief has been developed to help state policymakers calculate the stimulus effects of increased child care spending on output and employment in the state economy. There are three important aspects of the child care sector which need to be counted when assessing economic impact: 1) direct employment and output in the child care sector itself, 2) multiplier effects of the sector in the broader regional economy, and 3) the social infrastructure role child care plays in supporting the parent workforce. All of these are short term economic effects.

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