Caregiving

Compared to men, women spend a disproportionate amount of time attending to the needs of children and adults under their care.. Because of caregiving demands, more than half of employed women caregivers have made special workplace arrangements, such as arriving late, leaving early or working fewer hours. Women represent 61 percent of all caregivers and 75 percent of caregivers who report feeling very strained emotionally, physically or financially by such responsibilities. Minor-aged women and girls also shoulder caregiving duties, usually unrecognized and uncompensated. Affordable, accessible, quality child care and elder care, as well as greater delegation of responsibilities to spouses and partners, are required to offset the overwhelming care loads within families and communities.

The Three Faces of Work-Family Conflict: The Poor, the Professionals, and the Missing Middle

Work-family conflict is much higher in the United States than elsewhere in the developed world.  Not only do American families work longer hours; they do so with fewer laws to support working families. Only the United States lacks paid maternity-leave laws among the 30 industrialized democracies in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. The only family leave available to Americans is unpaid, limited to three months, and covers only about half the labor force. Discrimination against workers
with family responsibilities, illegal throughout Europe,11 is forbidden only indirectly here.  Americans also lack paid sick days, limits on mandatory overtime, the right to request work-time flexibility without retaliation, and proportional wages for part-time work.

URL: 
http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2010/01/pdf/threefaces.pdf

ECONOMIC RECOVERY ACT FORUM: Child Care and Green Jobs Key to Women’s Lasting Economic Security

By Sara K. Gould*

Linda Basch: How has ARRA impacted our economy from a local, community, or individual/family perspective?

Sara Gould: ARRA has provided a crucial injection of support to states during the worst of our nation’s current economic crisis. Take child care, for example: several states have used the funding to prevent budget cuts; some have reduced waiting lists for subsidized child care; and others have worked to improve the quality of child-care delivery.


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Workplace Gendered Tradeoffs Lead to Economic Inequalities for Women

Published on Feb 12, 2010 - 9:19:25 AM  YoubaNet.com

By: University of Washington

By Punditry Alone?

The Washington Post
Marie Wilson • February 8, 2010

Southern Strategy Study

Ms. Foundation work in US South. Study for W.K. Kellogg Foundation Women's Philanthropy and Poverty Cluster.

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A study finds more MBAS take the “Mommy Track”

A surprising number of highly-educated MBAs are dropping out of the labor force. Associate Professor Catherine Wolfram, a member of the Haas Economic Analysis and Policy Group found MBAs are more likely than MDs and JDs to be stay-at-home mothers.

URL: 
http://www.85broads.com/public/blogs/the-latest-news-from-janet-hanson/articles/an-interesting-article-from-haas-on-women-mbas

Equality for Women: Where do We Stand?

The results towards gender equality are mixed at the halfway point of completion of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the new report by the World Bank and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) says. Women’s health and education have improved substantially in most countries, but progress is lagging on improving their economic opportunities, and investments of some US$13 billion a year are needed to achieve the overall goal of gender equality and women’s empowerment.
 

URL: 
http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTGENDER/Resources/4pagerEqualityforWomen.pdf
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