Caregiving

Compared to men, women spend a disproportionate amount of time attending to the needs of children and adults under their care.. Because of caregiving demands, more than half of employed women caregivers have made special workplace arrangements, such as arriving late, leaving early or working fewer hours. Women represent 61 percent of all caregivers and 75 percent of caregivers who report feeling very strained emotionally, physically or financially by such responsibilities. Minor-aged women and girls also shoulder caregiving duties, usually unrecognized and uncompensated. Affordable, accessible, quality child care and elder care, as well as greater delegation of responsibilities to spouses and partners, are required to offset the overwhelming care loads within families and communities.

MAMA: Motherhood Around the Globe

 MAMA: Motherhood Around the Globe is an online exhibition of global art, voices and ideas. Visit our virtual galleries to be inspired, connect, and take action on issues that matter to mothers around the world.

URL: 
http://mama.imow.org/

Investing in Child Care Pays Large Dividends in Economic Growth

By Shyama Venkateswar, Ph.D.*

I joined a distinguished panel of researchers, advocates, and experts at the Yale Club on Thursday, January 19th when I presented our latest studies on increasing the access of low-income women to child care.

The panel was led by Jessica Sager, Co-Founder and Executive Director of All Our Kin, an innovative Connecticut-based program that has had significant success in training child care providers and increasing the economic security of low-income women.

To many of us, investing in child care is a no-brainer, but rigorous data from the Connecticut Center for Economic Analysis showed that for every dollar invested in child care, the state of Connecticut earned $15-20 in economic benefits. In other words, child care not only pays for itself, but has a significant multiplier effect on the economy and on our society.


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The MetLife Study of Women, Retirement, and the Extra-Long Life

Though women experience extra-long lives and, therefore, face a number of unique risks in retirement — including aging single, lower annual retirement incomes, greater health care costs, and caregiving responsibilities — women have not planned adequately, leading to a significant gap between their retirement income security needs and their response to them. In conjunction with the study we have produced a "Woman on the Street" video where women express their opinions on retirement preparation.

Key Findings

 

URL: 
http://www.metlife.com/mmi/research/women-retirement-extra-long-life.html#findings

GEM 2010 Women's Report

The Report found that, in 2010, more than 104 million women between 18-64 years old were actively engaged in starting and running new business ventures, contributing significantly to entrepreneurship in all 59 economies studied. Another 83 million women were running established businesses that they started over 3½ years earlier. Taken together, 187 million women were involved in creating and operating enterprises, ranging from just over 1.5 percent to 45.4 percent of the adult female population in these 59 economies. Although entrepreneurial activity among women is highest in emerging economies (45.5 percent), the proportion of all entrepreneurs who are women varies considerably among the economies: from 16 percent in the Republic of Korea to 55 percent in Ghana–the only economy with more women than  men entrepreneurs. A multi-year analysis shows that this gender gap has persisted across most economies for the past nine years (2002-2010).

URL: 
http://www.gemconsortium.org/news/757/gem-2010-womens-report-
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