Older Women

With women in the US living longer and postponing retirement, whether out of necessity or by choice, many face economic hardship and discrimination. Although illegal in theory, older women may, in practice, be excluded from job or promotional opportunities based on misconceptions about their abilities or customer preferences for youth. Dual discrimination on the job is evidenced by older women being denied access to training programs and being channeled into positions without upward mobility. Retirement benefits are being further eroded by a weakening of organized labor, economic restructuring and budget cutbacks.

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NATIONAL PARENTS' DAY FORUM: Pregnant in a recession

July 27, 2009 posted by Deborah Siegel*

Last weekend, my partner Marco and I took a childbirth class at the Manhattan hospital where I’ll be giving birth this fall.  I found it very moving that of this random gathering of six couples, two of them were gay.  Many of us were over 35 to boot, and we had all walked complex paths in order to be in that room.

As someone in the process of creating a new family, I think a lot about its definition these days.  To me, family is wherever there is love, and the desire to hold and nurture another soul.   To me, it’s as simple as that.


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Congressional Briefing: Making WIA Work for Women

This document includes commentary given by Carolyn Williams, Ariane Hegewisch, Susan Rees, Marie-Louise Caravatti, and Mimi Lufkin as part of a Congressional briefing about the WIA on April 7, 2010.

Question: There are currently 17 accountability measures in WIA, states complain that all the do is measure. How much more can/ should we ask of them? How does this fit into the discussions to get "common data" across federal programs?

Mimi Lufkin: Accountability measures speak to policy priorities. They are important. That said, such performance measures would not require additional data collection - this data is already being collected, it is just not being analyzed; and all the analysis would require is an additional computer programming command.

URL: 
http://iwpr.org/pdf/WIA_notes.pdf

Women and Social Security: Benefit Types and Eligibility

Spouse or family Social Security benefits are important for women because many women do not earn sufficient credits throughout their working career to be eligible for their own benefits due to caregiving for children or other family members. A recent analysis shows that 30 percent of women workers spent 4 or more years out of paid work during a 15-year period, compared with only 4 percent of men.  A larger percentage of women than men become eligible for Social Security benefits as spouses, caregivers of minor children, widows, surviving dependent parents, and so forth.

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/pdf/D488WomenandSS.pdf
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