Women & Girl Heads of Household

Women and girl heads of household are significantly poorer than their male counterparts. Of families headed by single mothers, 28.7 percent – 4 million of them – live in poverty compared with 13 percent – or 670,000 – of those headed by men. Poverty rates for households headed by single women of color (African American and Latina) rises to 40 percent. Average household income for women-headed households was $22,592 –- just over half the average for all households ($43,130). The difference in household income between married and single parents is significant –- only 5.9 percent of families headed by married parents live in poverty.

AGENDA Annual Conference 2012 external rev March 30

AGENDA: NCRW Annual Conference 2012 - Agenda-Setting Nationally and Globally: Leveraging Women's Voices

Women, Business, and the Law

 Women, Business and the Law is a World Bank report that presents indicators based on laws and regulations affecting women's prospects as entrepreneurs and employees, in part drawing on laws contained in the Gender Law Library. Both resources can inform research and policy discussions on how to improve women's economic opportunities and outcomes.

URL: 
http://wbl.worldbank.org/

Gender Equality Explorer

GENDER EQUALITY Explorer provides free, 24/7, user-friendly access to data disaggregated by gender from the U.S. Census Bureau collected through the American Community Survey.

URL: 
http://genderequalityexplorer.org/

Jumping Beyond the Broom

Fromt he Center for American Progress

 Liberty and justice for all is not yet a reality in America. Despite the election of our nation’s first African American president, black Americans continue to trail behind their white counterparts in education, employment, and overall health and wellbeing. And while some states and the federal government continue to expand protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people, more than half of all states still deny them basic civil rights. Such systemic inequities render people of color who are also gay and transgender among the most vulnerable in our society.

URL: 
http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2012/01/black_lgbt.html

Investing in Child Care Pays Large Dividends in Economic Growth

By Shyama Venkateswar, Ph.D.*

I joined a distinguished panel of researchers, advocates, and experts at the Yale Club on Thursday, January 19th when I presented our latest studies on increasing the access of low-income women to child care.

The panel was led by Jessica Sager, Co-Founder and Executive Director of All Our Kin, an innovative Connecticut-based program that has had significant success in training child care providers and increasing the economic security of low-income women.

To many of us, investing in child care is a no-brainer, but rigorous data from the Connecticut Center for Economic Analysis showed that for every dollar invested in child care, the state of Connecticut earned $15-20 in economic benefits. In other words, child care not only pays for itself, but has a significant multiplier effect on the economy and on our society.


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