Women & Girl Heads of Household

Women and girl heads of household are significantly poorer than their male counterparts. Of families headed by single mothers, 28.7 percent – 4 million of them – live in poverty compared with 13 percent – or 670,000 – of those headed by men. Poverty rates for households headed by single women of color (African American and Latina) rises to 40 percent. Average household income for women-headed households was $22,592 –- just over half the average for all households ($43,130). The difference in household income between married and single parents is significant –- only 5.9 percent of families headed by married parents live in poverty.

Supporting Families and Reducing Poverty

By Melissa Stevenson*


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Women's Employment During the Recovery

In 2010, women represented 46.7 percent of the United States labor force, a slightly larger share than at the start of the recession in 2007. Overall 71.9 million women were employed or looking for work, representing 58.6 percent of all women aged 16 and over. 

As the overall workforce has become more diverse, so have working women. Among women in the labor force, 13.1 percent are black, 4.7 percent are Asian and 12.8 percent are of Hispanic ethnicity. Along all racial groups, men are more likely to be employed than are women, however black women are almost as likely as black men to be employed — a fact that reflects the lower likelihood of black men working compared to other men. The gender gap is widest among Hispanics — as Hispanic men are more likely than other men to be employed, while Hispanic women are less likely than other women to be employed.

URL: 
http://www.dol.gov/_sec/media/reports/femalelaborforce/

Women's eNews

Women's eNews is an award-winning nonprofit news service covering issues of particular concern to women and providing women's perspectives on public policy.
 
With writers and readers around the globe Women's eNewsaudience stretches from New York City to New Delhi and all points between, reaching an estimated 1.5 million readers each year.

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editors@womensenews.org


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Rita Henley Jensen, Editor in Chief

Corinna Barnard, Editor

Juhie Bhatia, Managing Editor

Perrie Rizzo, Director of Development

Charlotte Cooper, Director of Marketing
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Areas of Expertise:

Access & Disparities, Advancing Women's Leadership, Advertising, Marketing & Stereotypes, Body Image & Wellness, Business & Entrepreneurship, Caregiving, Climate Change & Women, Diversity & Leadership, Domestic and Workplace Violence, Globalization, Arts & Activism, Disabilities, Diversity & Inclusion, Eco-Activism, Economic Development & Microfinance, Glass Ceilings & Barriers, Human Rights & Security, Trafficking and Prostitution, Communications, Media & Gender, Corporate Social Responsibility, Discrimination, Disparities & Access, Employment & Unemployment, Green Technology & Energy, Immigration & Migration, Violence Against Women, Global, Culture & Identity, Disparities, Housing, International Organizations, Sustainable Development, Diversity & Inclusion, Family & Society, Leadership in Government, Politics, and Business, Mental Health, Older Women, International Education, Leadership Pipelines, Peace & Peace-building, Population & Reproductive Rights, Poverty, Globalization, K-12, Reproductive Health, Safety Nets, Women in STEM, Women, Girls and War, Sexuality & Gender, Taxes & Tax Reform, Title IX, Women in History, Philanthropy and Social Entrepreneurship, Women & Girl Heads of Household, Women's Movements, Women's Networks, Work - Life Balance, Communications, Culture & Society, Economic Development & Security, Education & Education Reform, Equality, Diversity & Inclusion, Globalization, Human Rights & Security, Health, Reproductive Rights & Sexuality, Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM), Violence, Women's & Girls' Leadership
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At Rope's End: Single Women Mothers, Wealth and Assets in the U.S.

At Rope's End, a co-authored report by Mariko Chang, PhD author of Short-Changed: Why Women Have Less Wealth and What Can Be Done About It and C. Nicole Mason, Executive Director of the Women of Color Policy Network at New York University's Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service explores the economic security and vulnerability of single mothers through the lens of wealth and asset accumulation as opposed to income and employment.

URL: 
http://wagner.nyu.edu/wocpn/publications/files/AtRopesEnd.pdf
Member Organization: 

Looking to Women in America for Solutions

*By Kate Meyer

Last week Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Obama and Chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls, and Preeta Bansal, General Counsel and Senior Policy Advisor in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, hosted a White House Webchat to highlight findings from the recently released report Women in America: Indicators of Social and Economic Well-Being. Here at NCRW we were thrilled to see Jarrett and Bansal advocating for the same policies and programs that are on our agenda.


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The Dressmaker of Khair Khana - Author Series Event

Date/Time: 
03/21/2011

— AUTHOR SERIES EVENT —
THE DRESSMAKER OF KHAIR KHANA: FIVE SISTERS, ONE REMARKABLE FAMILY, AND THE WOMAN WHO RISKED EVERYTHING TO KEEP THEM SAFE
   
Gayle Tzemach Lemmon
Fellow and Women and Foreign Policy Program Deputy Director,
Council on Foreign Relations

Women's Foreign Policy Group Author Series: Gayle Lemmon on Afghanistan

Date/Time: 
03/21/2011

THE DRESSMAKER OF KHAIR KHANA
FIVE SISTERS, ONE REMARKABLE FAMILY, AND THE WOMAN WHO RISKED EVERYTHING TO KEEP THEM SAFE


In The Dressmaker of Khair Khana, journalist and author Gayle Tzemach Lemmon tells the story of Kamela Sediqi, the unlikely breadwinner who became an entrepreneur in Afghanistan under the Taliban. Desperate to support her brothers and sisters and unable to earn a living outside the home, she started a dressmaking business in her living room which offered work to 100 women in her community. Together these unsung heroines made the difference between survival and starvation for their families under Taliban rule.

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