Women & Girl Heads of Household

Women and girl heads of household are significantly poorer than their male counterparts. Of families headed by single mothers, 28.7 percent – 4 million of them – live in poverty compared with 13 percent – or 670,000 – of those headed by men. Poverty rates for households headed by single women of color (African American and Latina) rises to 40 percent. Average household income for women-headed households was $22,592 –- just over half the average for all households ($43,130). The difference in household income between married and single parents is significant –- only 5.9 percent of families headed by married parents live in poverty.

NWLC Fact Sheet: Making Unemployment Insurance Work for Women--The Unfinished Agenda (2010)

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act provided incentives to states to modernize their unemployment insurance (UI) programs and improve coverage for women. Many states responded – but many have yet to act, despite urgent need.

URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org/pdf/MakingUIWorkforWomen2010.pdf
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IWPR News Release: For many, 2010 is not off to a great start (2010)

Unemployment among women who maintain families without the support of a spouse is at 13 percent as of December 2009, the highest rate in more than 25 years.

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/pdf/Pressreleaseunempjan2010.pdf

ARRA: Extending the Unemployment Insurance Safety Net to Victims of Domestic Violence (2009)

In response to ARRA many states changed their laws to expand access to unemployment insurance benefits to victims of domestic violence. Unfortunately, over 15 states have yet to take the opportunity to extend eligibility (in the ARRA or other contexts), thus denying many victims, already in precarious situations, an important source of financial stability as they try to
escape the violence in their lives.

URL: 
http://www.legalmomentum.org/assets/pdfs/arra-extending-unemployment.pdf
Member Organization: 

NCRW Policy Brief: Economic Security

To overcome economic hardship, women need opportunities to learn new skills and earn fair wages in order to support themselves and their families and lead healthy and productive lives. Women’s advancement and well-being also depend on access to basic services and safety nets, such as paid sick leave, affordable child care and elder care, portable health care, adequate housing and secure retirements, including social security.

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FAST FACT: BLS Shines Light on Women’s Employment Situation

Posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

Calling all data geeks! The Bureau of Labor Statistics has made some really exciting changes to its monthly employment situation releases. We now have greater insight into women’s employment situation thanks to greater gender disaggregation of employment data. BLS has also added stats for persons with a disability, veterans, and foreign born workers.

Last month, I could only tell you women’s unemployment rate and break that down by race. This month, I have SO much more to report. For instance,


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NCRW Fact Sheet: Women and Poverty

Lifting women and children out of poverty is key to women’s economic security and wellbeing.

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NCRW Fact Sheet: Affordable Child Care Needed as Women's Labor Force Participation Grows

Making childcare affordable is critical to working families and key to women’s economic well-being and success, particularly
during times of economic recession. Studies demonstrate that childcare enables women to stay employed longer and establish greater work-life balance.

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FAST FACT: How the Safety Net is Failing Americans

January 12, 2010 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird


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FAST FACT: Women and Poverty in the Nation's Capital

December 9, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

The DC Women's Agenda, a program of Wider Opportunities for Women, recently released a gender analysis of the 2008 American Community Survey. They found that women remain in poverty even while working. Here are some of the stats they shared:

  • Women are eight times more likely to live in poverty than men in D.C.
  • Approximately 22% of women-headed households, working full or part time, live in poverty
  • Gender income disparities persist as men who worked full-time had an 8.5% increase in salary from 2007 to 2008 while their female counterparts had only a 2.3% increase.

To read the full report, click here.


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