Diversity & Inclusion

Programs to encourage greater diversity and inclusion, particularly in the leadership of educational institutions, are a central focus of NCRW’s work. We view affirmative action as an important component of efforts to level the playing field in all aspects of education – from access, to quality education, to teaching, tenure and administration. We have led important initiatives such as the Diversity in Higher Education Summit in 2006 and Ford Foundation-funded projects for diversifying the leadership of our member centers. Diversity and inclusion will continue to be overarching values that are central to our work and programs.

Leadership in Higher Education: A Path to Greater Racial and Gender Diversity final report

In 2003, with support from the Ford Foundation, the National Council for Research on Women undertook a project to explore the impact of leadership on diversity in institutions of higher education. The project was designed to identify best practices for enhancing diversity among students, staff, faculty, and within the curriculum; to identify leadership models provided by administrators and faculty that create and sustain greater diversity; and to analyze the institutional architecture necessary to support those practices. The analysis was to be based on the actual experiences of higher education leaders, their visions and strategies as identified in site visits to campuses and in the latest data and scholarship on diversity and leadership.

 

Looking to Women in America for Solutions

*By Kate Meyer

Last week Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Obama and Chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls, and Preeta Bansal, General Counsel and Senior Policy Advisor in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, hosted a White House Webchat to highlight findings from the recently released report Women in America: Indicators of Social and Economic Well-Being. Here at NCRW we were thrilled to see Jarrett and Bansal advocating for the same policies and programs that are on our agenda.


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Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
42° 21' 30.3516" N, 71° 3' 35.1828" W

Dr. Mariko Chang is the author of the new book, Shortchanged: Why Women Have Less Wealth and What Can Be Done About It, and the main author of the March 2010 report “Lifting as We Climb Women of Color, Wealth, and America’s Future.” Dr. Chang has a PhD in Sociology from Stanford University and was an Associate Professor of Sociology at Harvard University from 1998 to 2007 where she published work on occupational sex segregation across countries, the use of social networks for gathering financial information and began her work on the gender wealth gap. To help raise awareness of the wealth gap, she maintains a website that provides data and other information on wealth, assets, and debt for public policy makers, the media, researchers, and organizations that address economic security.
 

Location

Boston, MA
United States
42° 21' 30.3516" N, 71° 3' 35.1828" W

Texas Scaredy-Cats

By Rylee Sommers-Flanagan*

History is a collective story. It is selectively written, representing even unintended preferences of its author, and it is selectively understood, transforming as the mind of the reader practices a sort of cognitive dissonance to contextualize it.


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Gender Fatigue in MBA Programs

*By Julie Zeilinger

 Despite widespread satisfaction over the fact that women now constitute close to 50% of students in medical and law schools, it seems that the glass ceiling is still firmly in tact in the business realm; women currently constitute only 36.3% of students in MBA programs. What’s worse is that this statistic may point to a more serious cultural problem of “gender fatigue,” or the desire to ignore gender-based inequities despite pressing evidence that gender imbalances still exist.


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Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
38° 15' 9.9648" N, 85° 45' 30.4056" W

Lucinda Marshall is the Director of the Feminist Peace Network (FPN) which she founded in December, 2001 as a virtual ‘room of our own’ where women concerned about how the impending U.S. invasion of Afghanistan (and later Iraq) would impact women’s lives could share their thoughts and ideas for action in a safe, supportive space. While initially focusing on militarism, the network, with participants from around the world, has expanded its vision to also address what Marshall calls the other terrorism, the systemic global pandemic of violence against women.

Location

Louisville, KY
United States
38° 15' 9.9648" N, 85° 45' 30.4056" W

FAST FACT: Black Women's Health Care Access and Educational Attainment Rising

By Josephina Ragon* 

Last week, I waited eagerly on the steps of City Hall to get the latest facts on the status of black women and girls. The Law and Policy Group, Inc. released their 2010 Bi-Annual report to a crowd of fellow non-profits, media, and interested citizens. According to Executive Director and Founder Gloria J. Browne-Marshall, the report gives the public a picture of an “African-American female as a whole person—a snapshot of her life.” This particular study is the only ongoing national report on the current state of black females in the United States.

The research not only covers the challenges faced by black women today, but also their achievements thus far. For example,


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