Access & Disparities

Despite recent progress, women do not have equal access to educational opportunities. Socio-economic and racial disparities persist, particularly for immigrants and women of color. More effort needs to be focused on improving access to college preparatory and post-secondary education for low-income girls. Efforts need to include comprehensive sex education and teen pregnancy prevention as well as extended and flexible degree programs for single mothers. More focus is needed on making “hard sciences” (physics, chemistry, engineering) and technology more appealing to girls both in the classroom and as part of after-school activities.

The Gannon Center and EVOKE present Half the Sky with Sheryl WuDunn

Date/Time: 
03/23/2010

The 2010 Ann F. Baum Women and Leadership Speaker Series

 

Southern Strategy Study

Ms. Foundation work in US South. Study for W.K. Kellogg Foundation Women's Philanthropy and Poverty Cluster.

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Financial concerns of first-year college students have wide impact

More first-year college students have concerns about their ability to finance college than at any time since 1971, according to the CIRP Freshman Survey, UCLA's annual survey of the nation's entering students at four-year colleges and universities. Such concerns are part of an overall picture of the impact of the economic downturn on the experiences of entering college students.

More than half of incoming first-time students in 2009 reported "some" concern about financing college, and more students were turning to loans to pay for college ? 53.3 percent in 2009, up 3.9 percentage points from 2008 and the highest level reported in the last nine years.

NCRW Fact Sheet: Immigrant Women--Access to Education

Immigrant women face particular hardship in accessing basic educational opportunities due to a series of legal, social and cultural barriers that prevent them from exercising their civil rights. More efforts need to be focused at the local, state and national levels to ensure that their needs are recognized and addressed.

NCRW Fact Sheet: Women and Educational Disparities--A Call to Action

Today, women are more likely than men to attend college after high school, and are as likely to graduate with a postsecondary degree.  However, the gains made by women have not translated into earnings and higher wages in the labor market.

NCRW Fact Sheet: Keeping the Doors of Opportunity Open--Women, Minorities and Affirmative Action

Women and girls have made enormous strides since passage of the Educational Amendments and Title IX. Recent cutbacks in funding or lack of funding coupled with anti-affirmative action ballot initiatives have placed these advancements in jeopardy. More efforts need to be focused on preventing erosion of these hard-won achievements.

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Girls’ Education in the 21st Century: Gender Equality, Empowerment, and Economic Growth

Much has been done to increase gender equality in education over the past 15 years. National governments and the international community have followed through on promises made in various international forums to increase investments in girls’ education. Overall female enrollment at the primary level in low-income countries has accordingly grown from 87 percent in 1990 to 94 percent in 2004, considerably shrinking the gender gap. This progress is the result of recognition of centrality of girls’ education in development and the overall progress made under the Education for All (EFA) agenda.
 

URL: 
http://siteresources.worldbank.org/EDUCATION/Resources/278200-1099079877269/547664-1099080014368/DID_Girls_edu.pdf

Equality for Women: Where do We Stand?

The results towards gender equality are mixed at the halfway point of completion of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the new report by the World Bank and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) says. Women’s health and education have improved substantially in most countries, but progress is lagging on improving their economic opportunities, and investments of some US$13 billion a year are needed to achieve the overall goal of gender equality and women’s empowerment.
 

URL: 
http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTGENDER/Resources/4pagerEqualityforWomen.pdf

Medical women in academia: the silences we keep

There are more medical women today in academia as students, residents and faculty than ever before. However, a certain silence continues to dismiss the challenges they face in balancing career demands, family life, gender biases and harassment. This same silence continues to perpetuate a culture that is inhospitable to the retention of women in academic medicine.
 

URL: 
http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/reprint/167/8/877.pdf
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