Access & Disparities

Despite recent progress, women do not have equal access to educational opportunities. Socio-economic and racial disparities persist, particularly for immigrants and women of color. More effort needs to be focused on improving access to college preparatory and post-secondary education for low-income girls. Efforts need to include comprehensive sex education and teen pregnancy prevention as well as extended and flexible degree programs for single mothers. More focus is needed on making “hard sciences” (physics, chemistry, engineering) and technology more appealing to girls both in the classroom and as part of after-school activities.

Campus Action Project 2008-2009: Where the Girls Are: Promoting Equity for All

"Women and Girls" is a comprehensive look at girls' and women's educational progress over the past 35 years, from elementary school to college and beyond. Despite overall gains, the report highlights specific groups of women and girls for whom progress has been slower. The objective of this year's CAP program is to provide a platform for campus programming that is informed by this research.

Reinforcing Differences: College and the Gender Gap

Reinforcing Differences: College and the Gender Gap, a book in progress by Linda J. Sax analyzes the impact of college experiences separately for male and female students.

URL: 
http://www.gseis.ucla.edu/heri/gender_gap.html

A Measure of Equity: Women's Progress in Higher Education

The Association of American Colleges and Universities has released a report that compiles the latest data on women and gender equity in higher education. The report, "A Measure of Equity: Women's Progress in Higher Education," made its debut in Seattle during the association's annual meeting, which ended on January 24, 2009. The report updates a 1995 "data-driven" overview of women in higher education published by the American Council of Education, the association said in a written statement. It concludes that women have made strides in higher education, but the progress isn't across the board. Among the topics explored in "A Measure of Equity" are inequities for women in specific fields, how the careers of female faculty members are affected by families, and the growing pool of women in contingent faculty positions with no chance of being promoted.

URL: 
http://chronicle.com/news/article/5847/report-looks-at-how-far-women-have-come-in-higher-education

University of Arizona Southwest Institute for Research on Women

Established at the University of Arizona in 1976 the University of Arizona's Women in Science and Technology (WISE) program encourages women to become leaders in the fields of science and technology. More information can be found here: http://ws.web.arizona.edu/people/staff/powell.pho

URL: 
http://ws.web.arizona.edu/people/staff/powell.pho

The Center’s program Girls Excelling in Math and Science (GEMS)

The Center's program Girls Excelling in Math and Science (GEMS) was featured in a recent addition of the Atlanta Journal Constitution. The front-page article featured Inman Middle School's GEMS club. The middle schoolers work with students from Georgia Tech's Center for the Study of Women, Science & Technology. The article can be found here:

URL: 
http://www.ajc.com/services/content/metro/stories/2009/02/09/girlscience0209.html

“Understanding Plyler’s Legacy: Voices from Border Schools,” Nina Rabin Mary Carol Combs, and Norma Gonzalez, Journal of Law and Education (2008)

"Understanding Plyler's Legacy: Voices from Border Schools," Nina Rabin Mary Carol Combs, and Norma Gonzalez, Journal of Law and Education (2008) concerns the 25th anniversary of the Supreme Court decision that prevented states from denying undocumented immigrant children a free primary and secondary public education on the basis of their legal status.

URL: 
http://www.law.berkeley.edu/centers/ewi/RabinCombsGonzalezJLEDarticleonPlyler.doc

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
33° 44' 56.382" N, 84° 23' 16.7352" W

Beverly Guy Sheftall, Ph.D., is the founding director of the Women's Research and Resource Center and the Anna Julia Cooper Professor of Women's Studies at Spelman College.  She is also adjunct professor at Emory University's Institute for Women's Studies where she teaches graduate courses. At the age of sixteen, she entered Spelman College where she majored in English and minored in secondary education.  After graduation with honors, she attended Wellesley College for a fifth year of study in English.  In 1968, she entered Atlanta to pursue a master's degree in English; her thesis was entitled, "Faulkner's Treatment of Women in His Major Novels."  A year later she began her first teaching job in the Department of English at Alabama State University in Montgomery, Alabama.

Location

Atlanta, GA
United States
33° 44' 56.382" N, 84° 23' 16.7352" W

The National Women’s Law Center (NWLC)

URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org

WOMEN’S EQUALITY FORUM: Looking back and moving forward

By Terry O’Neill*

Today, August 26, marks the anniversary of the end of the 72-year fight for women’s right to vote. That’s right – our forebears faced 72 years of ridicule, ostracism, abuse, imprisonment … and also hope, determination, courage, and eventually, victory.


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WOMEN’S EQUALITY FORUM: Daddy, can a man be Prime Minister?

By Gwendolyn Beetham*

When I was in graduate school in London, one of my professors told a cute story about his daughter, born during the Thatcher era, who as a small child had asked him whether a man could be Prime Minister. The point that my professor was trying to make was that having more women in positions of power does make a difference in how women’s roles are perceived by society at large.


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