Access & Disparities

Despite recent progress, women do not have equal access to educational opportunities. Socio-economic and racial disparities persist, particularly for immigrants and women of color. More effort needs to be focused on improving access to college preparatory and post-secondary education for low-income girls. Efforts need to include comprehensive sex education and teen pregnancy prevention as well as extended and flexible degree programs for single mothers. More focus is needed on making “hard sciences” (physics, chemistry, engineering) and technology more appealing to girls both in the classroom and as part of after-school activities.

Shirley Chisholm Center for Research on Women

The Shirley Chisholm Center for Research on Women embrace a twofold mission. First, it promotes research on women by initiating projects and programs on campus that supports the work of faculty, encourages student learning, and provides information and resources to the wider Brooklyn community. Second, it upholds and preserves the legacy of Shirley Chisholm, a distinguished alumna of Brooklyn College. With the help of an external bequest to the Women's Studies Program, the center will be founded as an affiliate to the academic program.
 
Women and gender (the social and historical meanings of the distinction between men and women) are fundamental categories of social, cultural and scientific inquiry integral to the study of the diversity of human experience. Consequently, the overarching goal of the center is to conduct research to develop original scholarship on gender and new questions promoting the growth of feminist inquiry and practice.

Principal Staff

Namita N. Manohar, Coordinator
Ph. (718) 951-5476 / (718) 951-5000, ext. 1439

Irva Adams, Office Staff
Ph. (7180 951-5476 / (718) 951-5000, ext. 1442
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

 
The White House Project is a nonpartisan, nonprofit, 501(c)(3) organization that aims to advance women's leadership in all communities and sectors — up to the U.S. presidency — by filling the leadership pipeline with a richly diverse, critical mass of women.
 
Vote, Run, Lead is a dynamic program of The White House Project designed to engage women in the political process as voters, activists and candidates through trainings, inspiration and networking.
 
 
The Shirley Chisholm Project of Brooklyn Women's Activism is a repository of women's grassroots social activism in Brooklyn since 1945 and ongoing in the present.
 
In the spirit of Chisholm's legacy as a path-breaking community and political activist, the archive will also follow the many paths she pioneered by including materials representing the wide range of women's grassroots activism throughout the borough.

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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Women's Studies Student Scholarship

The Women's Studies Program offers an Annual Women's Studies Student Scholarship to two outstanding women's studies majors.
 
The scholarship is an annual tuition award of $5,000 ($2,500 for the fall and $2,500 for the spring semester), paid out over the student's senior year at Brooklyn College.

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Women's Studies Program

The Program in Women's Studies at Duke University is dedicated to exploring gender identities, relations, practices, theories and institutions. In the field's first decades, feminist scholarship reoriented traditional disciplines toward the study of women and gender and developed new methodologies and critical vocabularies that have made interdisciplinarity a key feature of Women's Studies as an autonomous field. Today, scholars continue to explore the meaning and impact of identity as a primary though by no means transhistorical or universal way of organizing social life by pursuing an intersectional analysis of gender, race, sexuality, class, and nationality. In the classroom, as in our research, our goal is to transform the university's organization of knowledge by reaching across the epistemological and methodological divisions of historical, political, philosophical, economic, representational, technological and scientific analysis.

Contact

210 East Duke Building
Durham , NC 27708
Ph. (919) 668-2548
Fx. (919) 684-4871
http://womenstudies.duke.edu
cfhharri@duke.edu


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Principal Staff

Ranjana Khanna, Program Director
Ph. (919) 668-2548
E-mail: rkhanna@duke.edu
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Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

 
For the past few years, Duke Women's Studies has had a programming theme which has attached to it a fall grad and post grad seminar, a film series, and other events throughout the year. Last year the theme was "Future of the Feminist '70s" and the year before it was "The Question of Species" (focused on human/non-human connections). The theme for 2012-13 is Feminism and Freedom. Professor Frances Hasso will be teaching a graduate/post-graduate seminar on Feminism and Freedom that will be offered in Fall 2012.
 
We are interested to understand how some of the major interventions of the 1970's--for example, feminist art and film practices, marxist and radical feminism, eco-feminism, lesbian separatism, human and civil rights discourse, cold war divisions and non-aligned movements, and postcolonial internationalism---continue to have an impact on feminist thought, offer important interventions into contemporary questions, or map the futures of feminism. Throughout the year we will engage the The Future of the Feminist 1970s with a variety of events, projects and courses.
 
 
The 2010-11 annual theme is Animals and the Question of Species and will revolve around three major points: new theoretical formulations in continental philosophy around the question of human exceptionalism; the human/animal boundary and connection, and the ethics, politics, and advocacy that flow from those; and the role of gender in developing a greater understanding of nonhuman animals.
 
 
As many may know, a discourse emerged in the mid-1970's that aimed to investigate the connection between feminism and earth and animals. These women called themselves Eco-Feminists and generated many ideas about the nature of women, the plight of animals, and the need for conservation. Due to a whole host of theoretical and practical conflicts, this project was never seriously embraced by academic feminists. Duke Women's Studies New Eco-feminism project hopes to revisit these questions, and develop theories and methodologies that will resonate within academic feminism today. We learned from E2T that there is a great need for further study of conservation, land use, and animal advocacy, not just from the perspective of science but from the humanities and interpretive sciences as well. We believe that contemporary feminist theory has much to offer such an engagement. Despite the fact that our eco-feminist foremothers may have been entrenched in essentialist ideology in their formulations, we believe their questions were the right ones. What can feminist thinking offer in response to the many global crises we face today including massive development, deforestation, animal torture, extinction, habitat loss, pollution, and global warming? 

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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Graduate Employment Opportunities

Independent Study and the Moxie Project

The Moxie Project is a selective one-year experience at Duke University that combines academic, professional and applied learning experiences to foster leadership development undergraduates. Over the year, students will participate in a Course on Women and Leadership, an eight week NYC Summer Internship, and a Fall Capstone Seminar.  The Moxie Project is supported by DukeEngage. More information is available on the Moxie Project website.

 
Each fellowship carries a nine-month ~ $21,580 stipend (tuition and fees to be paid by the Graduate School). Please note that only students in years one through six are eligible for health insurance. Beginning in year seven, students are responsible for providing their own health insurance.

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Project: CEW is working at the local level to increase welfare recipients' access to higher education

Project: CEW is working at the local level to increase welfare recipients' access to higher education, in collaboration with the Department of Human services, the county workforce development agency, area colleges and universities, and the Center for Civil Justice in Saginaw, MI.

URL: 
http://www.umich.edu/~cew/
Member Organization: 

CEW Brief: “Access to Higher Education: Barriers and Benefits,”

CEW Brief: "Access to Higher Education: Barriers and Benefits," a fact sheet on access to higher education in Michigan and the U.S. http://www.cew.umich.edu/cewaction/facts.html

URL: 
http://www.cew.umich.edu/cewaction/facts.html
Member Organization: 

“Michigan Women and the High-Tech Knowledge Economy,” Susan Kaufmann (2008)

"Michigan Women and the High-Tech Knowledge Economy," Susan Kaufmann (2008), explores barriers girls and women experience while outlining actions that state and federal government, local school boards, colleges and universities, and Michigan families can take to ensure that women take their full place in the highly-trained technology workforce.

URL: 
http://www.umich.edu/~cew/
Member Organization: 

Black Women in the Ivory Tower, 1850-1954: An Intellectual History, Stephanie Y. Evans (2008)

Black Women in the Ivory Tower, 1850-1954: An Intellectual History, Stephanie Y. Evans (2008), chronicles Black women's struggle for access to higher education. http://www.upf.com/book.asp?id=evansf06

URL: 
http://www.upf.com/book.asp?id=evansf06

Campus Action Project 2008-2009: Where the Girls Are: Promoting Equity for All

"Women and Girls" is a comprehensive look at girls' and women's educational progress over the past 35 years, from elementary school to college and beyond. Despite overall gains, the report highlights specific groups of women and girls for whom progress has been slower. The objective of this year's CAP program is to provide a platform for campus programming that is informed by this research.

Reinforcing Differences: College and the Gender Gap

Reinforcing Differences: College and the Gender Gap, a book in progress by Linda J. Sax analyzes the impact of college experiences separately for male and female students.

URL: 
http://www.gseis.ucla.edu/heri/gender_gap.html

A Measure of Equity: Women's Progress in Higher Education

The Association of American Colleges and Universities has released a report that compiles the latest data on women and gender equity in higher education. The report, "A Measure of Equity: Women's Progress in Higher Education," made its debut in Seattle during the association's annual meeting, which ended on January 24, 2009. The report updates a 1995 "data-driven" overview of women in higher education published by the American Council of Education, the association said in a written statement. It concludes that women have made strides in higher education, but the progress isn't across the board. Among the topics explored in "A Measure of Equity" are inequities for women in specific fields, how the careers of female faculty members are affected by families, and the growing pool of women in contingent faculty positions with no chance of being promoted.

URL: 
http://chronicle.com/news/article/5847/report-looks-at-how-far-women-have-come-in-higher-education

University of Arizona Southwest Institute for Research on Women

Established at the University of Arizona in 1976 the University of Arizona's Women in Science and Technology (WISE) program encourages women to become leaders in the fields of science and technology. More information can be found here: http://ws.web.arizona.edu/people/staff/powell.pho

URL: 
http://ws.web.arizona.edu/people/staff/powell.pho
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