Higher Education

While women have made enormous strides in higher education, progress has been uneven. Women now receive a majority of undergraduate degrees but disparities remain, particularly at graduate, doctoral and post-doctoral levels. Colleges and universities still reflect inequities based on race, ability, geography and income. And more efforts must focus on advancing women and women of color into tenured and leadership positions with institutions of higher learning. There is growing concern about the rising cost of higher education and how to improve quality and access. The financial crisis of 2008-09 has shrunk many endowment funds and reduced the number of scholarships available as well as making state and community colleges more competitive and less accessible. The effects of corporatization on college campuses are also a source of concern for the quality and independence of scholarship, including for women’s studies and other inter-disciplinary programs.

Stalled in the Pipelines: Opening Pathways to Women’s Leadership (NCRW Regional Conference 2011)

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10/13/2011 - 10/14/2011

Opening Pathways to Women’s Leadership

Claremont Graduate University

150 E. 10th Street, Claremont, CA

NCRW’s network, including academic, nonprofit, philanthropic, business, and policy leaders, gathered to focus on the status of women’s leadership in multiple sectors. The conference identified best practices, as well as generated recommendations and next steps for advancing women's leadership across sectors. The Conference Agenda follows.

Death of Humanities? From Crisis to Blame

By Quailan Pantin, Programs Intern                                               

Speculation about declining interest in the humanities has ridden a rollercoaster of emotions and outrage. The results: Women are to blame.


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Trends in the Education Attainment of New Mothers

Pew Research Center released a report in May 2013 titled, Record Share of New Mothers are College Educated.  The report explored changing educational trends among new mothers.  “New mothers” include women between the ages of 15-44 who gave birth within the last year and those whose youngest child (living in their household) is less than one year old.


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Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success

Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success

Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success (2013) explores an underappreciated part of our higher education system. The report looks at the role of community colleges in women’s education, including challenges women face in completing a certificate or degree, or in transferring to a four-year institution. The particular concerns and needs of student mothers’ and barriers women face in pursuing STEM and nontraditional fields are examined in detail. The report includes recommendations that will strengthen community colleges for all students.

Teaser: 
Higher education is essential to the productivity and innovation of the U.S. workforce, and ongoing economic challenges have only underscored this imperative. In 2009, President Barack Obama launched the American Graduation Initiative, a plan to dramatically increase the number of U.S. college graduates by targeting an o8en overlooked part of our national higher education system: community colleges.

Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success

Women in Community Colleges: Access to Success (2013) explores an underappreciated part of our higher education system. The report looks at the role of community colleges in women’s education, including challenges women face in completing a certificate or degree, or in transferring to a four-year institution. The particular concerns and needs of student mothers’ and barriers women face in pursuing STEM and nontraditional fields are examined in detail. The report includes recommendations that will strengthen community colleges for all students.

URL: 
http://www.aauw.org/resource/women-in-community-colleges/

Are Women More Focused on Building Rather than Breaking?

Since 1960, when women only accounted for 39 percent of the undergraduate population, women’s relative numbers in college have steadily increased. According to Goldin et al. (2006), women are the majority of U.S. college students overall and they receive the bulk of bachelor’s degrees. This trend isn’t limited to the U.S. – in fact, it’s prevalent in most rich countries.


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The Pregnancy Assistance Fund as a Support for Student Parents in Postsecondary Education

The Pregnancy Assistance Fund (PAF) is a competitive grant program created by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that provides funding to states and tribes to support programs that provide pregnant and parenting women and girls with supportive services to help them complete high school or postsecondary degrees (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 2010a). Only two states, Minnesota and Virginia, have used their PAF grants to provide services related to postsecondary institutions. This fact sheet describes several of the programs and initiatives created by these PAF grantees. Unless otherwise noted, all program information comes from interviews with program officials and staff.

by Rhiana Gunn-Wright (July 2012)

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/the-pregnancy-assistance-fund-as-a-support-for-student-parents-in-postsecondary-education

The State of Women of Color in the United States

Issue brief from the Center for American Progress:

This issue brief examines the state of women of color in the United States at large in regards to four key areas: the workplace wage gap, health, educational attainment, and political leadership. While conversations in the mainstream media would suggest that women of color are a monolithic entity, it is important to note that women of color are a diverse group with a variety of experiences. We offer specific data points on various racial and ethnic groups where available as we present the issues of greatest importance to women of color today, but remember that data are not always available for direct comparisons of different groups of women of color compared to their white counterparts.

 

URL: 
http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2012/07/women_of_color_brief.html

Community College Partnerships for Student and Career Success: Program Profile of Carreras en Salud

Postsecondary students with children often need an array of supports to succeed in their studies, which can require significant coordination among new and existing services (Conway, Blair, and Helmer 2012; Henrici n.d.; Miller, Gault, and Thorman 2011). Such supports might include financial aid, academic and career counseling, job placement assistance, transportation, housing, child care, and classes in English-as-a-Second Language. To more effectively provide an expanded range of student resources, community colleges often partner with local nonprofits, private businesses and foundations, and government institutions (Altstadt 2011; Bragg et al. 2007; Bray, Painter, and Rosen 2011; Conway, Blair, and Helmer 2012; Leutz 2007; Singh 2007; Wilson 2010).

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/community-college-partnerships-for-student-and-career-success-program-profile-of-carreras-en-salud
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