Higher Education

While women have made enormous strides in higher education, progress has been uneven. Women now receive a majority of undergraduate degrees but disparities remain, particularly at graduate, doctoral and post-doctoral levels. Colleges and universities still reflect inequities based on race, ability, geography and income. And more efforts must focus on advancing women and women of color into tenured and leadership positions with institutions of higher learning. There is growing concern about the rising cost of higher education and how to improve quality and access. The financial crisis of 2008-09 has shrunk many endowment funds and reduced the number of scholarships available as well as making state and community colleges more competitive and less accessible. The effects of corporatization on college campuses are also a source of concern for the quality and independence of scholarship, including for women’s studies and other inter-disciplinary programs.

The Center for Feminist Research and the Gender Studies Program at USC Women are pleased to announce that Diana Nyad will be speaking at our 11th annual Women in Higher Education luncheon.

Date/Time: 
03/25/2010

Diana Nyad is an American swimmer and world record holder. She was inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame in 1986. Nyad was honored with her induction in the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 2003. She currently provides a five-minute radio piece on sports every week for KCRW and National Public Radio called The Score, as well as for the Marketplace radio program.

Angela Davis Honors Beverly Guy-Sheftall During NWSA Conference

Angela Y. Davis is known internationally for her ongoing work to combat all forms of oppression in the U.S. and abroad. She has been active as a student, teacher, writer, scholar, and activist/organizer. Davis served as the keynote speaker for the 2009 National Women's Studies Association's annual conference where she honored Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Ph.D., NWSA President & Anna Julia Cooper Professor of Womens Studies at Spelman College.

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The Ever Increasing Majority of Women Graduates

According to a recent OECD report, Higher Education to 2030, women will become an even larger majority of the graduate talent pool in only one decade. Companies are already having to ensure that they don’t swing the gender balance too far in favor of women. However, it must be noted that women primarily study the social sciences, while men study engineering.
 

URL: 
http://www.20-first.com/778-0-trend-of-women-as-the-majority-of-talented-will-continue.html

Perceived Barriers: Gender Equity in College Coaching and Administration

The third study conducted by the NCAA to measure career aspirations and perceptions of careers in intercollegiate athletics among females. It also seeks to provide NCAA policymakers, conference offices and member institutions with detailed information on the perceptions and concerns of female student-athletes, coaches, administrators and officials regarding careers for females in intercollegiate athletics.
 

URL: 
http://www.ncaapublications.com/Uploads/PDF/Barriers22461795-87bd-44ff-b94a-0dd11b9ee83c.pdf

Financial concerns of first-year college students have wide impact

More first-year college students have concerns about their ability to finance college than at any time since 1971, according to the CIRP Freshman Survey, UCLA's annual survey of the nation's entering students at four-year colleges and universities. Such concerns are part of an overall picture of the impact of the economic downturn on the experiences of entering college students.

More than half of incoming first-time students in 2009 reported "some" concern about financing college, and more students were turning to loans to pay for college ? 53.3 percent in 2009, up 3.9 percentage points from 2008 and the highest level reported in the last nine years.

NCRW Fact Sheet: Immigrant Women--Access to Education

Immigrant women face particular hardship in accessing basic educational opportunities due to a series of legal, social and cultural barriers that prevent them from exercising their civil rights. More efforts need to be focused at the local, state and national levels to ensure that their needs are recognized and addressed.

NCRW Policy Brief: Education

Despite gains in educational achievement for women and girls over the last decade, the gap continues to widen for low-income women and women of color. Access to education is key to women’s economic security and well-being. More vigorous efforts are needed to ensure sufficient support programs at the state and federal levels for low-income women and women heads of households.
 

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NCRW Fact Sheet: Women and Educational Disparities--A Call to Action

Today, women are more likely than men to attend college after high school, and are as likely to graduate with a postsecondary degree.  However, the gains made by women have not translated into earnings and higher wages in the labor market.

NCRW Fact Sheet: Keeping the Doors of Opportunity Open--Women, Minorities and Affirmative Action

Women and girls have made enormous strides since passage of the Educational Amendments and Title IX. Recent cutbacks in funding or lack of funding coupled with anti-affirmative action ballot initiatives have placed these advancements in jeopardy. More efforts need to be focused on preventing erosion of these hard-won achievements.

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