Higher Education

While women have made enormous strides in higher education, progress has been uneven. Women now receive a majority of undergraduate degrees but disparities remain, particularly at graduate, doctoral and post-doctoral levels. Colleges and universities still reflect inequities based on race, ability, geography and income. And more efforts must focus on advancing women and women of color into tenured and leadership positions with institutions of higher learning. There is growing concern about the rising cost of higher education and how to improve quality and access. The financial crisis of 2008-09 has shrunk many endowment funds and reduced the number of scholarships available as well as making state and community colleges more competitive and less accessible. The effects of corporatization on college campuses are also a source of concern for the quality and independence of scholarship, including for women’s studies and other inter-disciplinary programs.

Ticket Office Sexism: The Gender Gap in Pricing for NCAA Division I Basketball

Date/Time: 
03/04/2010
Lunchtime Presentation
  
Laura Pappano and Allison J. Tracy, Ph.D.

 Location: Cheever House 

 For more details>>

 

DUAL-CAREER ACADEMIC COUPLES: WHAT UNIVERSITIES NEED TO KNOW

Based on the partnering status of full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty in thirteen top U.S. research universities, Dual-Career Academic Couples explores the impact of dual-career partnering on hiring, retention, professional attitudes, and work culture in the U.S. university sector. It also makes recommendations for improving the way universities work with dual-career candidates and strengthen overall communication with their faculty on hiring and retention issues.

URL: 
http://www.stanford.edu/group/gender/ResearchPrograms/DualCareer/researchstudies.html

Thirty-Three Years of Women in S&E Faculty Positions

The relatively low proportion of women in academic science and engineering (S&E) has been the topic of numerous recent books, reports, and workshops. Data for 2006 show that women continue to constitute a much lower percentage of S&E full professors than their share of S&E doctorates awarded in that year. Even in psychology, a field heavily dominated by women, women were less than half of all full professors, even though they earned well more than half of doctorates in 2006.

URL: 
http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/infbrief/nsf08308/

Medical women in academia: the silences we keep

There are more medical women today in academia as students, residents and faculty than ever before. However, a certain silence continues to dismiss the challenges they face in balancing career demands, family life, gender biases and harassment. This same silence continues to perpetuate a culture that is inhospitable to the retention of women in academic medicine.
 

URL: 
http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/reprint/167/8/877.pdf

Stanford Researcher Urges Universities, Businesses to Offer Benefit To Pay For Housework

by Adam Gorlick on 01/19/10

Originally posted in the Stanford Report January 19, 2010

Professor Londa SchiebingerLonda Schiebinger’s study shows academic scientists spend about 19 hours a week on basic household chores. If universities offered a benefit to pay someone else to do that work, scientists would have more time to spend on the jobs they’re trained for, she says.

Stanford researcher urges universities, businesses to offer benefit to pay for housework

January 20, 2010 posted by admin

Originally posted by Adam Gorlick January 19, 2010 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Londa Schiebinger’s study shows academic scientists spend about 19 hours a week on basic household chores. If universities offered a benefit to pay someone else to do that work, scientists would have more time to spend on the jobs they’re trained for, she says.


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A “soft” approach to innovating science education

December 8, 2009 posted by Theresa Johnston

Originally posted December 7, 2009 on Gender News from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research


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FAST FACT: GENDER EQUITY IN ATHLETICS DURING DIFFICULT ECONOMIC TIMES

November 16, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

As the economy dips, schools are tightening their belts. Unfortunately—but not surprisingly—a new fact sheet released by the National Women’s Law Center reveals that girls are bearing the brunt of budget cuts. According to the fact sheet,


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Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
43° 36' 45.4716" N, 116° 12' 39.8736" W

Dr. Lisa McClain is an Associate Professor of History and the Director of Gender Studies at Boise State University. She researches the issue of domestic violence and sexual assault perpetrated against women with disabilities. She serves as a board member of the Idaho Equal Access Collaborative, a partnership of the Boise State University Gender Studies Program with statewide disability and domestic violence/sexual assault organizations. Through this work, McClain examines and proposes changes to the systems responding to women with disabilities who experience sexual and domestic violence. In history, her fields of specialty include the history of Catholicism, the history of religion during the Renaissance/Reformation era and gender and popular culture in early modern Europe.

Location

Boise, ID
United States
43° 36' 45.4716" N, 116° 12' 39.8736" W
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