Higher Education

While women have made enormous strides in higher education, progress has been uneven. Women now receive a majority of undergraduate degrees but disparities remain, particularly at graduate, doctoral and post-doctoral levels. Colleges and universities still reflect inequities based on race, ability, geography and income. And more efforts must focus on advancing women and women of color into tenured and leadership positions with institutions of higher learning. There is growing concern about the rising cost of higher education and how to improve quality and access. The financial crisis of 2008-09 has shrunk many endowment funds and reduced the number of scholarships available as well as making state and community colleges more competitive and less accessible. The effects of corporatization on college campuses are also a source of concern for the quality and independence of scholarship, including for women’s studies and other inter-disciplinary programs.

Close, but No Degree

 Even in New Jersey’s highly educated workforce, with 44 percent of adults possessing at least a two‐year degree, almost a fifth of adults age 25‐64 have started college but never finished.

Inexpensive policy changes can enable the state’s agencies and colleges to improve college completion rates in the state and simultaneously meet workforce goals, according to a new report,Close, but No Degree, by the Center for Women and Work (CWW) at the School of Management and Labor Relations at Rutgers University.

URL: 
http://smlr.rutgers.edu/cww-report-close-but-no-degree
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Tools for Student Parent Success: Varieties of Campus Child Care

 This toolkit is the first in a series by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR). It introduces the wide variety of child care services that exist at institutions of higher learning. Rather than an exhaustive study of campus child care programs, it is an introduction to possible options. It is for those seeking to provide quality child care at colleges or universities and for those considering how to expand or rethink existing services.

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/tools-for-student-parent-success-varieties-of-campus-child-care

Keeping Score When It Counts

 The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport, at the University of Central Florida releases its “Keeping Score When It Counts" series periodically. It documents comprehensive analysis of statistics involving the graduation rates of Division I collegiate athletic teams in selected sports.

In 2012, the study of graduation rates for teams in the women’s college basketball championship tournament found higher numbers than those in the men’s event and a smaller disparity between white and black players.

URL: 
http://www.tidesport.org/ncaagraduationrates.html

Strengthening the diversity of top academic leaders

 Findings and insights from Egon Zehnder International’s Global Academic Leadership Survey 

Most leading academic institutions are strongly committed to diversity, a commitment visible in their policies on staff recruitment and student admissions, as well as in their academic programs. Yet how diverse are their leaders? A survey by Egon Zehnder International of over 300 top universities and research institutions worldwide shows that the most senior level of academic leadership remains overwhelmingly male and locally-born.

URL: 
http://www.egonzehnder.com/us/clientservice/diversityandinclusion/thoughtleadership/publication/id/17500687

Judith Robinson Rogers, President, Cottey College

Judy Robinson Rogers, Ph.D., became the eleventh president of Cottey College in 2004. Previously, she served as vice president for leadership and ethics at Georgetown College, Georgetown, Kentucky, and as associate vice president for academic affairs, undergraduate dean, and professor of English at Morehead State University, Morehead, Kentucky. In addition to general education English, Dr. Rogers taught undergraduate and graduate courses in modern and American literature. She received her undergraduate degree in English and speech/theatre from Centre College of Kentucky and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill which she attended as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow.

Clyda Rent

Clyda S. Rent, Ph.D. is recognized as a successful leader, speaker, strategic planner, executive coach, and marketer. She played primary roles in the successful turnaround efforts of two significant higher education institutions. She served as a university president, vice-president, or dean for over two decades and on corporate boards. Rent was named by Working Woman magazine as One of the Nation’s Ten Most Admired Managers and in 2000 was honored as one of eleven for the International Women’s Forum award, Women Who Make a Difference. Rent is Co-founder and Principal of Rent Consulting Group, LLC in Charlotte, NC. The firm focuses on executive search, leadership, strategic planning, and executive coaching for leaders in higher education and health care sectors. Her coaching/mentoring clients include leaders and aspiring-to-next-level leaders from dean to president from major colleges and universities and health care organizations.

Lorna Edmundson, President Emerita, Wilson College

Lorna Duphiey Edmundson, Ed.D., President Emerita of Wilson College, is recognized as an effective leader, fundraiser, and facilitator of sustainable growth and change in higher education. Dr. Edmundson helps educational institutions build on their distinctions; strengthen finances and planning; create ethnic, racial and gender equity; encourage women and students of color to pursue the sciences; diversify and internationalize campuses; and forge international partnerships. She served as President of Wilson College from 2001-2011 and has held leadership roles at Columbia University, the American University of Paris, Marymount College, Trinity College, and Colby Sawyer College. Dr. Edmundson was honored with the Athena International Leadership Award, an Honorary Degree from Rhode Island College, and an Honorary, Lifetime Membership in Rotary International. She is featured among Asian and U.S. leaders in Women at the Top, by Cheung and Halpern.

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