Higher Education

While women have made enormous strides in higher education, progress has been uneven. Women now receive a majority of undergraduate degrees but disparities remain, particularly at graduate, doctoral and post-doctoral levels. Colleges and universities still reflect inequities based on race, ability, geography and income. And more efforts must focus on advancing women and women of color into tenured and leadership positions with institutions of higher learning. There is growing concern about the rising cost of higher education and how to improve quality and access. The financial crisis of 2008-09 has shrunk many endowment funds and reduced the number of scholarships available as well as making state and community colleges more competitive and less accessible. The effects of corporatization on college campuses are also a source of concern for the quality and independence of scholarship, including for women’s studies and other inter-disciplinary programs.

Generation STEM: What Girls Say about Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

 Generation STEM is national research report investigating girls' perceptions, attitudes, and interests in the subjects and general field of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) from the voices of girls themselves. The report consists of a literature review, as well as qualitative (focus group) and quantitative (survey) research with 1,000 girls across the country. The study finds that girls are interested in STEM and aspire to STEM careers, but need further exposure and education about what STEM careers can offer, and how STEM can help girls make a difference in the world.

URL: 
http://www.girlscouts.org/research/publications/stem/generation_stem_what_girls_say.asp
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Partner Violence and Girls’ Educational and Vocational Development

Partner Violence and Girls’ Educational and Vocational Development:

URL: 
http://csws.uoregon.edu/?p=12330

Women in Science: Degrees and Faculty in Natural & Applied Sciences

 n all scientific fields of study except biological sciences men continue to outnumber women. The fields of physical sciences and computer sciences and engineering show the highest gender disparity. Why does this underrepresentation matter?

Fewer female graduates in scientific higher education translate into fewer women working in scientific research and occupations. For example, at Rutgers, women are only 19.5 percent of tenured and tenure-track science faculty.

URL: 
http://iwl.rutgers.edu/documents/njwomencount/WomeninScienceFactSheet.pdf
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CIRP Surveys and Services

 The Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP) contains the well-known and long-running CIRP Freshman Survey and follow up assessments such as the Your First College Year (YFCY) and the College Senior Survey. The UCLA Higher Education Research Institute also administer the HERI Faculty Survey, which examines issues from the faculty standpoint. A variety of data related services based on the results of these surveys are available. Please click on links below to get more information.

URL: 
http://www.heri.ucla.edu/herisurveys.php

Acosta/Carpenter Women in Intercollegiate Sport A Longitudinal, National Study Thirty-Five Year Update: 1977-2012

 In 2012, forty years after the enactment of Title IX, there are an average of 8.73 womenʼs teams per school and a total of about 200,000 female intercollegiate athletes: the highest in history.

In 1970, prior to the 1972 enactment of Title IX, there were only 2.5 womenʼs teams per school and only about 16,000 total female intercollegiate athletes. In 1977/1978, the academic year preceding the mandatory compliance date for Title
IX, the number of varsity sports for women had grown to 5.61 per school.

A decade later, in 1988, the number had grown to 7.71 and at the turn of the century, the growth continued to 8.14.
Today, in 2012, the average number of womenʼs teams per school sets an all time record of 8.73 giving weight to the adage: “If you build it, they will come.”

URL: 
http://acostacarpenter.org/AcostaCarpenter2012.pdf
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