Early Childhood

Research has demonstrated the benefits of pre-K and early childhood educational programs. Yet, despite overwhelming evidence of its importance for educational success, most 3- and 4-year-olds in the United States do not have access to publicly funded programs. Quality child care that includes developmental and educational components must be made more accessible. Head Start and other Early Education initiatives deserve increased support at the federal, state and local levels.

Great Gifts for Mothers of Young Children: Quality, Accessible, Affordable Early Care and Education

Quality early care and education are truly a gifts that will keep on giving, not only to mothers, but to all of us.  We’re not saying that it’s only important to mothers; fathers need and want this too.  However, there has been much research on its impact on mothers, especially single mothers.  According to the Center for American Progress, “...although mothers are now the primary breadwinners or co-breadwinners in nearly two-thirds of American households with children, women spend more than twice as much time as men providing primary care to children.


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Tools for Student Parent Success: Varieties of Campus Child Care

 This toolkit is the first in a series by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR). It introduces the wide variety of child care services that exist at institutions of higher learning. Rather than an exhaustive study of campus child care programs, it is an introduction to possible options. It is for those seeking to provide quality child care at colleges or universities and for those considering how to expand or rethink existing services.

URL: 
http://www.iwpr.org/publications/pubs/tools-for-student-parent-success-varieties-of-campus-child-care

KIDSCOUNT Data Snapshot on Children Living in High-Poverty Communities

 This Data Snapshot highlights newly available national, state, and city data in the KIDS COUNT Data Center that shows a 25 percent increase in the number of children residing in areas of concentrated poverty since 2000. The snapshot indicates how high-poverty communities are harmful to children, outlines regions in which concentrated poverty has grown the most, and offers recommendations to address these issues.

The Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2012

URL: 
http://www.aecf.org/KnowledgeCenter/Publications.aspx?pubguid={DF6A3A0E-9AA3-405E-9FB9-E1D9C80C5E5C}

Investing in Child Care Pays Large Dividends in Economic Growth

By Shyama Venkateswar, Ph.D.*

I joined a distinguished panel of researchers, advocates, and experts at the Yale Club on Thursday, January 19th when I presented our latest studies on increasing the access of low-income women to child care.

The panel was led by Jessica Sager, Co-Founder and Executive Director of All Our Kin, an innovative Connecticut-based program that has had significant success in training child care providers and increasing the economic security of low-income women.

To many of us, investing in child care is a no-brainer, but rigorous data from the Connecticut Center for Economic Analysis showed that for every dollar invested in child care, the state of Connecticut earned $15-20 in economic benefits. In other words, child care not only pays for itself, but has a significant multiplier effect on the economy and on our society.


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