Women's, Gender & Feminist Studies

In 1970, the field of women’s, gender and feminist studies was launched and was able to thrive in the ensuing years. NCRW was established in 1982 to create a supportive network for the burgeoning women’s research movement. Today, there are more than 900 women’s studies programs in the US with more than 10,000 courses offered on college campuses. Much of the curriculum is interdisciplinary and, in many instances, mainstreamed across subject areas. From the social sciences to liberal arts, fine arts and the sciences, feminist theory and framing (especially the intersection of race, gender and class) is having an important impact across disciplines in academia and beyond.

Women's Research & Resource Center

The Spelman College Women’s Research & Resource Center embraces our unique identity and claims our pioneering role among historically Black and women’s colleges firmly rooted in the liberal arts tradition. We are committed to creating a global community of progressive women and men who envision a world free from injustice, exploitation, violence, poverty, waste, greed, illness, and misogyny. We are especially opposed to practices and images that debase African American and other women of color. 

Through curricular innovation, scholarship, activism and collaborations, the Women’s Center is educating future generation of free-thinking, unapologetic Black women who will document our stories, advocate for our rights, and join with others in the ongoing struggle to transform our communities and rescue the planet!

Principal Staff

Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Dir. Women's Research & Resource Center
E-mail: bsheftal@spelman.edu

M. Bahati Kuumba, Dir. Women's Research & Resource Center
E-mail: kuumba@spelman.edu

Ayoka Chenzira, Director of Digital Moving Salon
E-mail: chenzira@spelman.edu

Lillie Picard, Administrative Assistant
Ph. (404) 270-5625
E-mail: lpicard@spelman.edu

Dana Pride Jones, Program Coordinator
Ph. (404) 270-5627
E-mail: dpjones@spelman.edu
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Another premier component of the program is the Digital Moving Image Salon, which teaches students how to make films. Launched in 2004 by Dr. Ayoka Chenzira, an award-winning, internationally acclaimed film and video digital media artist, and the College’s first Cosby Chair, DMIS serves as a learning space, training ground, and production studio for students interested in documentary film making and digital media productions.
 
Juliana Montgomery graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in film studies from Spelman in 2006. She has the distinction of being Spelman's first graduate in the independent major she created, and was also elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Among the works that she associate produced was the 2009 Emmy Award-winning Coca-Cola advertisement, “Heist.”
“Spelman’s comparative women’s studies department not only supported my independent major and course of study, it made possible an environment through which my understanding of images of women – especially of women of color – within the visual media, could be realized,” said Montgomery.

Toni Cade Bambara Scholar-Activism Conference

Named for feminist author, scholar, activist and filmmaker Toni Cade Bambara, the conference acknowledges her legacy of scholarship and social activism.

“Year after year we’ve been able to motivate students to engage in creative ways to celebrate the life and legacy of one of our most important sheroes,” said Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Ph.D., founding director of the Women’s Research and Resource Center. “No one else remembers Toni Cade Bambara annually in the ways we do, and for that, I am sure the people she impacted for so many years, including me, are very grateful.”
 
The two-day conference is developed and facilitated by Spelman students who are led by Bahati Kuumba, Ph.D., associate professor of women's studies, and associate director of the Women's Research and Resource Center. It features paper presentations, workshops and performance pieces that delve into dimensions of Black/African women’s lives, scholarship and social change activism.

"The conference brings awareness to issues related to women of African descent and women of color who have been actively engaged in using their knowledge and organizational skills to forward social justice," said Kuumba.

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Project on Women and Social Change

The Smith Project on Women and Social Change is an interdisciplinary faculty research group. Founded in 1978, the project draws together faculty from a range of disciplines including anthropology, political science, sociology, education, history, exercise and sport studies, literature, psychology, religion, and economics.

Contact


Northampton, MA 01063
Ph. (413) 585-3591
Fx. (413) 585-3593
http://www.smith.edu/wsc
kgauger@smith.edu


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Principal Staff

Susan C. Bourque, Acting Director

Christine M. Shelton, Co-Director
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Reports & Resources

Women on Power: Leadership Redefined, edited by Sue J. M. Freeman, Susan C. Bourque, and Christine M. Shelton, with a foreword by Jill Ker Conway, Boston, Massachusetts: Northeastern University Press, 2001.
 
Politics and Society in Ottoman Palestine: The Arab Struggle for Survival and Power, by Donna Robinson Divine. Boulder, Colorado: Lynn Reinner, 1994.
 
The Politics of Women's Education: Perspectives from Asia, Africa and Latin America, edited by Jill Ker Conway and Susan C. Bourque. Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Press, 1993.
 
Free Women of Spain: Anarchism and the Struggle for the Emancipation of Women, by Martha Ackelsberg. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1991.
 
Managing Lives: Corporate Women and Social Change, by Sue J. M. Freeman. Amherst, Massachusetts: University of Massachusetts Press, 1990.
 
Women, Welfare and Higher Education: Towards Comprehensive Policies, edited by Martha Ackelsberg, Randall Bartlett, and Robert Buchele. Northampton, Massachusetts: Smith College, 1988.
 
Learning About Women: Gender, Politics, and Power, edited by Susan C. Bourque, Jill Ker Conway, and Joan Wallach Scott, Daedalus, Volume 116, Number 4, Fall 1987; and Ann Arbor, Michigan: The University of Michigan Press, 1989.
Unequal Colleagues: The Entrance of Women Into the Professions, 1890-1940, by Penina Migdal Glazer and Miriam Slater. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 1987.
 
The Economics of Comparable Worth, by Mark Aldrich and Robert Buchele. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Ballinger Publishing Company, 1986.
 
Women Living Change: Cross-Cultural Perspectives, edited by Susan C. Bourque and Donna Robinson Divine. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Temple University Press, 1985.
 
Women's History as Women's Education: Essays by Natalie Zemon Davis and Joan Wallach Scott from a Symposium in Honor of Jill and John Conway, April 17, 1985, Smith College. Northampton, Massachusetts: Sophia Smith Collection and College Archives, Smith College, 1985.
 
Women's Place in the Academy: Transforming the Liberal Arts Curriculum, edited by Marilyn Schuster and Susan Van Dyne. Totowa, New Jersey: Rowman and Allanheld, 1985.
 
Family Life in Seventeenth-Century England: The Verneys of Claydon House, by Miriam Slater. Boston, Massachusetts: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1984.
 
Women of the Andes: Patriarchy and Social Change in Two Peruvian Towns, by Susan C. Bourque and Kay B. Warren. Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Press, 1981.
 
The Environmental Crusaders: Confronting Disaster and Mobilizing Commmunity, by Penina Migdal Glazer and Myron Peretz Glazer, University Park, Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 1998.
 
Building Domestic Liberty: Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Architectural Feminism, by Polly Wynn Allen. Amherst, Massachusetts: University of Massachusetts Press, 1988.
 
The Whistle-Blowers: Exposing Corruption in Government and Industry, by Myron Peretz Glazer and Penina Migdal Glazer. New York, New York: Basic Books, Inc., 1989.

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Center News

Center for Gender in Organizations

The work of the Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO), an academic research institute, serves as a fundamental call to action. Our research and experience repeatedly demonstrate that gender equity and diversity greatly improve work practice and overall organizational effectiveness.
 
Gender is an organizational issue. Our research emphatically shows that businesses benefit when they view gender equity as a strategic imperative and a source of competitive advantage.

Contact

300 The Fenway
Boston, MA 02115
Ph. 617-521-3824
Fx. 617-521-3878
http://www.simmons.edu/som/centers/cgo/index.php
cgo@simmons.edu


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Principal Staff

Patricia Deyton, Director
Specialization: Nonprofit and general management, gender and diversity
E-mail: patricia.deyton@simmons.edu

Stacy Blake-Beard, Senior Faculty Affiliate
Specialization: Organization behavior, mentoring, diversity
E-mail: stacy.blakebeard@simmons.edu
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Gender, Equity, and Change

The Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO) takes a unique approach to addressing gender and diversity issues in the workplace. Rather than seeing gender as a problem that individual women and men confront at work, we believe gender is deeply embedded in an organization's culture and practices. It is at this level of analysis that the most significant research is undertaken and from which real change emerges.

Leadership

Understanding leadership similarities and differences of women and men as well as their resulting impact on organizations is a linchpin of the Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO) research. In addition to studying leadership issues, we also regularly examine the progress women have made in achieving leadership positions in varied organizations to understand the lessons learned and consider, as well, the contributions made by role models and mentors.

Diversity

CGO uses a "complexity lens" to understand gender and diversity. Through this lens, differences are seen as a simultaneous process of identity and institutional practices. The new insight gained through the use of this lens has led CGO to the development of a theory of simultaneity to strengthen diversity efforts. Simply stated, the theory works with the reality that all people have multiple identities, all of which are present "at the table" in any interaction and any of which may be more or less salient in any particular situation.

Globalization

Globalization research focuses on the growing interconnectedness of workforces, stemming from trends such as outsourcing, immigration and technological change. The Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO) seeks to understand the impact of multiple cultures and identities on work practices and global workforce productivity and to help ensure that traditional white, North American standards are not automatically applied to the rest of the world.

Entrepreneurship


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Reports & Resources

CGO Commentaries

CGO Commentaries are articles adapted from talks or papers delivered by our faculty affiliates and other distinguished scholars and practitioners. They highlight current and emerging topics in gender equity, diversity and organizational studies.

CGO Insights Briefing Notes

CGO Insights is a series of short briefing notes on topics promoting organizational effectiveness through improved gender equity and diversity. These are written for practitioners and scholars alike.

CGO Working Papers

CGO Working Papers disseminate trends and new developments in research, theory, and practice related to gender equity, diversity and organizational effectiveness.

Books

CGO faculty and affiliates have authored and edited more than a dozen books. CGO faculty affiliates have authored and edited many books.


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Center News

Institute for Women's Leadership

The Institute for Women's Leadership is a consortium of teaching, research, and public service units of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. The institute and its members are dedicated to examining leadership issues and advancing women's leadership in all arenas of public life – locally, nationally and globally. The interaction among the member units of the consortium encourages scholarly and practical explorations of how institutions are structured by gender, race and ethnicity, socio-economic status and promotes new understanding of women's leadership for social change. 

Contact

162 Ryders Lane
New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8555
Ph. 848-932-1463
Fx. 732-932-4739
http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~iwl
iwl@rci.rutgers.edu


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Principal Staff

Alison R. Bernstein, Director
Ph. (848) 932-8444
E-mail: arb179@rci.rutgers.edu

Lisa Hetfield, Associate Director and Director of Development
Ph. (848) 932-8447
E-mail: lisahet@rci.rutgers.edu

Mary K. Trigg, Director of Leadership Programs and Research
Ph. (848) 932-8456
E-mail: trigg@rci.rutgers.edu

Connie A. Ellis, Corporate Programs Director
Ph. (848) 932-8457
E-mail: ellisc@rci.rutgers.edu

Sasha Wood Taner, Associate Director, Leadership Programs and Research
Ph. (848) 932-8458
E-mail: sdwood@rci.rutgers.edu

Gail Reilly, Department Administrator
Ph. (848) 932-8449
E-mail: gareilly@rci.rutgers.edu
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WINGS

Eight-month, memntoring program that  links Rutgers undergraduates with senior professional women.  

CLASP

Five-week, Rutgers undergraduate summer service-learning program which places students in social justice internships.

Visiting Scholars Program

Programs sponsored by the institute and consortium members for guest scholars, researchers, and others to visit Rutgers.

Executive Leadership Program

Intensive workshop series for women leaders holding senior-level positions in industry, the professions and nonprofit organizations.

Leadership Scholars Program

Two-year, 19 credit Rutgers undergraduate certificate program in women's leadership.


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Reports & Resources

Books and Monographs 

Mary S. Hartman, ed., Talking Leadership: Conversations with Powerful Women (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1999). 

Winnifred R. Brown-Glaude, ed., Doing Diversity in Higher Education: Faculty Leaders Share Challenges and Strategies (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2008). 

Mary K. Trigg, ed., Leading the Way: Young Women's Activism for Social Change (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2010). 

Reports

Women Leaders Count began as an Institute research project in 1993, was reborn in the fall of 2001 as a research partnership between Rutgers’ Institute for Women’s Leadership and the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, the Division on Women, and is once again a stand-alone research project at the IWL. The reports in the series focus on the status of New Jersey women in key areas of demographics and activism, work, education, health, poverty, the law, and violence against women. Since 2007, the Institute has published Women’s Leadership Fact Sheets as part of the project, and will continue to publish occasional reports. By bringing together available data, analyzing demographic trends, and identifying research gaps, we hope that Women Leaders Count will serve as a valuable tool to inform equitable policies and effective programs and increase public awareness of women’s leadership progress and challenges. 

Published Issues of Women Leaders Count Reports

“Challenge and Change: Younger and Older Women in New Jersey”

Focuses on factors pertinent to the lives of both younger and older women in the state and discusses how families and living arrangements, economics and work, health, education, and political participation differently affect women at various stages of their lives.

“Substance Abuse and Its Effects on Women”

In New Jersey, women make up one-third of admissions to treatment facilities for substance abuse, and the percentage of women among those incarcerated for drug-related offenses has increased. “Substance Abuse and Its Effects on Women” considers the gender-specific issues of childcare, female-headed households, and the implications these have for women’s drug abuse and recovery.

“New Jersey Women: Who Are We? How Are We Faring?”

“New Jersey Women”: Who Are We? How Are We Faring?” presents “vital statistics” on women’s status in New Jersey in the areas of population, age, immigration, marriage and marital status, families and households, education, work, and political representation, and considers future trends for women in the state.

“Boxed In and Breaking Out: New Jersey Women and Work in the 1990s”—Caroline Jacobus (November 1993)

“More and More on Their Own: Demographic Trends of New Jersey Women”—Caroline Jacobus (March 1993) 


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Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Visiting Scholars Program

Programs sponsored by the Institute and Consortium Members for guest scholars, researchers, and others to visit Rutgers.

Mary S. Hartman Women's Leadership Opportunity Fund at the Institute for Women's Leadership

The purpose of this Fund is to provide Rutgers undergraduate students with opportunities to expand their education beyond the classroom through academic conferences, internships, research experiences, national summit meetings, leadership training, and skills workshops.


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Institute for Research on Women

At the forefront of feminist research for over thirty years, the Institute for Research on Women (IRW) advances cutting-edge, interdisciplinary scholarship on gender, sexuality and women. Part of the School of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, the IRW was founded in 1977 by faculty and administrators seeking to expand feminist scholarship and activism beyond the university’s fledgling Women’s Studies program. Today, the IRW supports a broad range of programming designed to stimulate research on gender, sexuality and women within and across the disciplines, throughout and beyond Rutgers. Promoting faculty and student connections and building intellectual community are also central to the IRW’s mission.

Contact

160 Ryders Lane
New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8555
Ph. (732) 932-9072
Fx. (732) 932-0861
http://irw.rutgers.edu/
irw@rci.rutgers.edu


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Principal Staff

Yolanda Martínez-San Miguel, Ph.D., Director

Sarah Tobias, Ph.D., Associate Director
E-mail: stobias@rci.rutgers.edu

Marlene Importico, Program Coordinator
E-mail: importic@rci.rutgers.edu

Yomaira Figueroa, IRW Learning Community Coordinator
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The IRW fosters feminist research at Rutgers through creative programming tied to an annual theme. The weekly Faculty/Graduate Seminar brings together faculty and advanced graduate students from a broad range of disciplines and from all three Rutgers campuses. Participants present works-in-progress, addressing the IRW’s annual theme from a range of disciplinary and methodological perspectives. The Distinguished Lecture Series presents innovative research by prominent feminist scholars and activists from Rutgers and other universities, exploring the annual theme in depth. The Undergraduate Learning Community extends the strengths of the IRW’s programs and research community to advanced undergraduate students who attend the IRW’s lecture series, develop research projects related to the annual theme, and work with IRW seminar fellows as mentors. Recent annual themes have included The Culture of Rights/The Rights of Culture (2008-9), Gendered Agency (2009-10) and The Art & Science of Happiness (2010-11).
 
In addition to its thematic programming, the IRW regularly organizes a one-to-three day Spring Colloquium addressing emergent debates in feminist activism and scholarship. Previous topics include the intersections of labor, class and sexuality; immigrant women’s collective organizing and the tensions between gender and disability studies.
 
Other regular programs include a workshop on Negotiating Basics for Women Entering the Academic Job Market, featuring women faculty of different ranks from the sciences, social sciences and humanities, and a Graduate Student Forum on Feminist Scholarship, enabling graduate students to share and receive feedback on their research.

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Reports & Resources

Books

Gender and Culture at the Limits of Rights, edited by Dorothy L. Hodgson (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011), explores the concept of "women's rights as human rights” and the way in which a rights-based analysis can promote or limit the attainment of gender justice. Most of the essays in the volume were originally presented as part of the 2008-9 IRW seminar and its accompanying spring colloquium.

No Permanent Waves: Recasting Histories of U.S. Feminism, edited by Nancy Hewitt (Rutgers University Press, 2010) showcases a group of papers that were first presented at an IRW colloquium. The contributors "address issues of race, class and sexuality within histories of women's rights and feminism as well as the cultural and intellectual currents and social and political priorities that marked movements for women's advancement and liberation. The concept of waves surging and receding cannot fully capture these multiple and overlapping movements, chronologies, issues, and sites."

The papers collected in The Sex of Class: Women Transforming American Labor, edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble (Cornell University Press, 2007), examines the role sex plays in the workforce, as well as contemporary and historical domestic and global labor movements. 

The Journal of International Labor and Working-Class History issued a special edition on “Working-Class Subjectivities and Sexualities” in Spring 2006. Edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble and Victoria Hattam, several of the articles in this volume were first presented as papers at spring colloquium organized by the IRW and ILWCH in 2004. 

Gendering Disability, edited by Bonnie G. Smith and Beth Hutchison (Rutgers University Press, 2004), collects work presented at a three-day IRW conference that brought together gender studies and disabilities studies scholars.

Feminist Locations: Local and Global, Theory and Practice edited by Marianne DeKoven (Rutgers University Press, 2001), is based on scholarship presented at the IRW from 1995 to 1998.

Transitions, Environments, Translations: Feminisms in International Politics edited by Joan W. Scott, Cora Kaplan, and Debra Keates (Routledge, 1997), from work presented at a conference jointly presented by the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton and the IRW.

With the Women's Rights Litigation Clinic at Rutgers Law School-Newark, the IRW co-sponsored The Project on Reproductive Rights Laws for the 1990s which culminated in the 1989 Rutgers University Press volume Reproductive Laws for the 1990s, co-edited by Sherrill Cohen and Nadine Taub.

Describing the impetus for Changing Our Own Words: Essays on Criticism, Theory and Writing By Black Women (Rugters University Press, 1989), Board of Governors Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English Cheryl Wall writes, “I took the idea for a one-day conference to then-IRW director Carol Smith, who embraced it enthusiastically. The conference on October 22-23, 1987, was one of the most gratifying experiences of my career. The room for the symposium was filled with many of the most brilliant scholars and writers of my generation. The book became one of the foundational texts in black feminist criticism. I will forever be grateful for the support of the IRW.”

Women, Households, and the Economy, edited by Lourdes Beneria and Catharine R. Stimpson (Rutgers University Press, 1987), collects papers presented at a two-day conference stemming from a grant from the Russell Sage Foundation “to bring together a group of scholars on the cutting edge of the thinking about women and the economy.”

Working Papers

Revised and condensed versions of work presented at our weekly seminar have been published in four volumes. Copies are available on request from the IRW. 
 
Femininities, Masculinities, and The Politics of Sexual Difference(s): Working Papers from the 2003-2004 Seminar, edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble, Beth Hutchison and Amanda B. Chaloupka
 
Reconfiguring Class and Gender: Working Papers from the 2002-2003 Seminar, edited by Dorothy Sue Cobble, Amanda B. Chaloupka, and Beth Hutchison
 
Modes of Knowledge and Action: Working Papers from the Women in the Public Sphere Seminar 1998-1999, edited by Beth Hutchison
 

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Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

 Visiting Global Scholars

As part of its commitment to foster feminist research at Rutgers and beyond, the IRW hosts feminist researchers from around the world as visiting global scholars. Visiting global scholars are able to pursue their own research and writing in a supportive environment and access Rutgers’ unique feminist resources. They also participate in the IRW seminar, present public lectures to the university community and speak in classes and community forums.


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Center for Gender Studies

The influence of teaching and learning about gender issues touches virtually every aspect of human life. The Center for Gender Studies is committed to providing women and men with knowledge and experience that facilitate intelligent and informed choice and communication regarding gender issues. Knowledge and experience empower individuals to function as competent decision makers in their own lives; sensitivity and awareness enable individuals to arrive at wise decisions and communicate them effectively. The Center seeks to serve as a responsible broker of gender-relevant knowledge and experience for students and other members of the academic community, which necessarily implies service to broader local, national, and international constituencies. The mission is global; the focus is on service to the multi-cultured society in which we live.

Contact


Radford, VA 24142
Ph. 540-831-6644
Fx. 540-831-6798
http://www.radford.edu/~gstudies
gstudies@radford.edu


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Principal Staff

Hilary Lips, Ph.D., Director & Professor and Chair, Department of Psychology
Ph. 540-831-5361
E-mail: hlips@runet.edu/hlips@radford.edu
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Projects & Campaigns

Click here for all recent projects.


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Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Eleanor Kemp Memorial Award for Undergraduate Research

Every year, this award is given out to one or two undergraduate students whose research is relevant to gender or women. Funds for this award come form a small endowment.

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Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study

The mission of the Radcliffe Institute is to create an academic community where individuals can pursue advanced work in any of the academic disciplines, professions, or creative arts. Within that broad purpose, it sustains a continuing commitment to the study of women, gender, and society.

Contact

10 Garden Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Ph. (617) 495-8601
Fx. (617) 496-4640
http://www.radcliffe.edu
info@radcliffe.edu


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Principal Staff

Lizabeth Cohen, Dean

Nancy F. Cott, Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Foundation Director of the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America

Marilyn Dunn, Executive Director of the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America

Jeanne Follansbee, Academic Dean of the Radcliffe Institute

Matthew E. Kernkraut, Associate Dean for External Relations

Nisha Mongia, Administrative Dean of the Radcliffe Institute

Susan S. Pintus, Associate Dean of Finance

Judith Vichniac, Associate Dean of the Fellowship Program

Rebecca E. F. Wassarman, Director of Academic Ventures
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The Schlesinger Library

A repository of 80,000 volumes and 13,000 linear feet of manuscripts, Schlesinger is the preeminent library documenting the history of women in America. Its holdings include letters, diaries, and personal papers of women and families. The library also houses records of women's organizations, books about women, culinary history, women's periodicals, photographs, videotapes, and oral histories. Prominent collections include the papers of Amelia Earhart, Betty Friedan, and others. The library also administers research grants and sponsors exhibitions and other public programs.

Henry A. Murray Research Center

A singularly valuable archive of longitudinal social science data, the Center serves as a resource for research on the changing lives of American women. The Center's primary purpose is to promote the use of existing social science data to further explore human development and change. A national archive of more than 270 studies is available to researchers from all levels and disciplines, free of charge. The center also sponsors conferences and workshops on methodological and substantive issues.

Academic Engagement Programs

As part of its mission to create an academic community where individuals can pursue advanced work, Radcliffe sponsors a range of programs that engage Harvard faculty and students in new scholarly and research endeavors. Academic Engagement Programs also serves the public by hosting lectures, conferences, and symposia that aim to increase understanding about cutting-edge research.


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Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Fellowship Program

As a fellow, you will focus on your individual project while benefiting from a dynamic, multidisciplinary community at Harvard University. Only 5 percent of applicants are selected each year. Fellows—women and men—are at the forefront of the arts, journalism, humanities, sciences, and social sciences.

Harvard Student Research Partnerships

Our Radcliffe Institute Research Partnership Program matches students with leading artists, scholars, scientists, and professionals.

The partnership is designed to be mutually beneficial. Fellows act as mentors, while students provide research assistance, acquire valuable research skills, and participate in the Institute’s rich intellectual life.

Graduate Student Fellow

As a graduate student fellow, you are expected to reside in Cambridge during your fellowship year. You will participate in the Radcliffe Institute Fellowship Program by attending weekly fellows' talks and lunches. You are also invited, though not required, to present your own work in a talk to the fellows. 

Carol K. Pforzheimer Student Fellowships

The Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America invites Harvard undergraduates to do research in the library's collections by applying for competitive awards up to $2,500. The research may be carried out in conjunction with a project for academic credit, although this is not required.

Research Support Grants

The Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America invites scholars whose research requires use of the library's collections to apply for research support.

Applications will be evaluated on the significance of the research and the project's potential contribution to the advancement of knowledge as well as its creativity in drawing on the library's holdings. Grants of up to $3,000 will be given on a competitive basis to cover travel expenses, living expenses (up to $125 per diem), photocopying, and other incidental research expenses, but not the purchase of durable equipment.

Dissertation Grants

The Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America invites scholars whose dissertation research requires use of the library's collections to apply for research support.

Applications will be evaluated on the significance of the research and the project's potential contribution to the advancement of knowledge as well as its creativity in drawing on the library's holdings. Grants of up to $3,000 will be given on a competitive basis to cover travel expenses, living expenses (up to $125 per diem), photocopying, and other incidental research expenses, but not the purchase of durable equipment.

Oral History Grants

The Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America invites scholars who are conducting oral history interviews relevant to the history of women or gender in the United States to apply for support of up to $3,000.

This grant stipulates that the interviews take place in accordance with guidelines of the Oral History Association, that consent is obtained from interviewees for their words to be viewed by researchers worldwide, and that true copies or transcripts of the original recording of the oral interviews, as well as copies of the consent forms, be deposited in the Schlesinger Library.


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Five College Women's Studies Research Center

The Five College Women’s Studies Research Center was founded in 1991 as a site for international scholarly activity on issues relating to women and gender. Located at 79 and 83 College Street on the Mount Holyoke College campus in South Hadley, Massachusetts, it is supported by the Five College consortium of Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Smith Colleges and the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The five institutions have a thirty-five year history of cooperation and innovation in higher education and boast one of the largest concentrations of women’s and gender studies scholars anywhere in the world.

Contact

50 College Street
South Hadley, MA 01075
Ph. (413) 538-2275
Fx. (413) 538-3121
http://www.fivecolleges.edu/fcwsrc
fcwsrc@fivecolleges.edu


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Principal Staff

Karen Remmler, Director

Elizabeth M. Lehman, Assistant Director
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Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

"Race, Gender, and New Media"

Trea Andrea M. Russworm, Ph.D
A research practicum and new course focused on the study of race and gender dynamics in new media production.  The practicum and course will culminate in several projects and archives for supporting further research in these areas.  
 
 
Kate Singer, Ph.D
Research that aims to explore how technology and cyberspace has been represented in art, specifically in relationship to women or to the feminine more theoretically. 
 
 
Leda Cooks, Ph.D
This course brings together the study of gender, culture, identity, and new social movements with the material practices of organizing, cooking and sharing bread with others in the community.
 

Mari Castañeda, Ph.D, Martha Fuentes-Bautista, Ph.D, Bernadine Mellis, MFA, and Demetria Rougeaux Shabazz, Ph.D.
We will develop a network of critical media scholars, digital media-makers, educators, activists, and students engaged in feminist media justice work in the Five Colleges and surrounding area, at the hub of which will be a team-taught Feminist Media Justice Colloquium drawing on local media activism resources.
 
 
Banu Subramaniam, Ph.D 
This project is aimed at enhancing the gender and technology components of courses across the curriculum in the Department of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies at the University of Massachusetts, while also strengthening the department's online presence.  Three courses: Feminist Engagements with Biomedicine: Health, Ethics, and the Nature of Difference, Biology of Difference, and Gender & Technology--will be newly developed or extensively revised, developing in each online components; the last is being developed as a blended course. 
 
Ford Curricular Crossings
 
From 1995-1998, the Center's Curricular Crossings grant, our first international initiative, addressed intersections between area studies and women's studies relevant to women's health and welfare on a global scale. Funds from Ford were used to bring seven researchers to the Center from Africa, Latin America, the Middle East and South Asia to conduct studies and work with faculty to recast area studies courses to better reflect the situation of women worldwide, and to make women's studies courses more international in scope. More than one hundred Five College faculty participated in various aspects of the program from conferences to symposia to informal discussions. These collaborations resulted in a rich collection of new curricular materials.

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Ann Ida Gannon Center for Women and Leadership

The Gannon Center for Women and Leadership within Loyola University Chicago is dedicated to the development of women as scholars and leaders. The center aims to provide outstanding role models and mentors and to offer resources and research data that enable women to expand upon their workplace, community, and academic contributions. The four areas of activity of the center are: Women and Leadership Archives, Women Studies Program, Institute for Women and Leadership, and a Heritage Room representing Mundelein College.

Contact

1032 W. Sheridan Road
Chicago, IL 60660
Ph. 773-508-8430
Fx. 773-508-8492
http://www.luc.edu/gannon/
gannoncenter@luc.edu


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Principal Staff

Dawn A. Harris, Ph.D., Director
E-mail: gannoncenter@luc.edu


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Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

Baum Speaker Series

In 2006, the Gannon Center for Women and Leadership became the fortunate recipient of a bequest from the estate of the late Ann and Alvin Baum Family for a speaker series. The series invites women of national and international renown to frame an informed discussion with members of our Loyola community, our neighborhood and city on issues at the intersection of women and leadership, public policy and social justice.

 


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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Gannon Scholars

The Gannon Scholars Leadership Program is a four-year progressive program that engages students in the development of leadership, service and scholarship. We provide opportunities for leaders to investigate and analyze areas of concern in our suffering world in order to creatively design and apply workable solutions to build a more just social world order. Working collaboratively within the University and with global and local partners, we promote an innovative and interdisciplinary approach to shape women leaders for the 21st Century.

Faculty Fellows Program

To encourage research on women and their contributions to society, and to promote active learning and scholarship, the Gannon Center for Women and Leadership is pleased to sponsor the Faculty Fellowship Program in Women's Studies Scholarship. Funded by the Gannon Center's Endowment, up to two fellows will be appointed for the Spring semester each year and released from a semester of teaching. (The fellowship does not include release from the faculty member's other departmental or college duties. Faculty applying for the program should negotiate these duties with his/her chair and/or Dean.) Special consideration will be given to the study of women and leadership.

Johnson Scholarship

The Carroll and Adelaide Johnson Scholarship Fund offers rising juniors of Loyola University Chicago opportunities to conduct interdisciplinary research related to a social justice issue that is focused on women and leadership. The Johnsons established the fund through Loyola University's Gannon Center for Women and Leadership for students with demonstrated financial need.

Visiting Scholars Program

The Visiting Scholar Program brings researchers from around the world to Loyola for a month to a year to study issues of concern to women. The primary purpose of the program is to provide research support for a scholar conducting research on women's issues. The Visiting Scholar is awarded an office within the lakeside center, a computer and Internet access, library privileges and the friendly support of a community of feminists. The Gannon Center is located on the second floor of Piper Hall. Its location on the northeast side of Chicago offers easy access to public transportation for research work in notable libraries and archives in the area as well as exceptional cultural opportunities. The center has a developing Women and Leadership Archives that may be helpful to some scholars.

WISER (Women in Science Enabling Research)

The WISER program was designed in 1993 to provide undergraduate women at Loyola University Chicago with an introduction to laboratory research, and to create a community of scientists through which undergraduate women could be mentored and encouraged toward careers in the sciences. Students are welcome to participate in and attend lectures, panel discussions, and workshops organized by WISER. Undergraduate students are also invited to apply to the Laura L. Mayer Summer Internship Program as a means of gaining laboratory experience.


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Women and Public Policy Program at the John F. Kennedy School of Government

The Women and Public Policy Program of Harvard Kennedy School closes gender gaps in economic opportunity, political participation, health and education by creating knowledge, training leaders and informing public policy and organizational practices.
 
Our research provides evidence-based insights on the role of gender in shaping economic, political and social opportunities available to individuals. We identify successful interventions and measure their impact on women, men, and society, then share recommendations on what policies, organizational practices and leadership techniques help close involuntary gaps.
 
We train today’s leaders and prepare future leaders to create a more gender equal world, while providing women with skills and tools to successfully navigate existing systems.

Contact

79 John F. Kennedy Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Ph. (617) 495-8143
Fx. (617) 496-6154
http://www.ksg.harvard.edu/wappp
WAPPP@harvard.edu


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Principal Staff

Danielle Boudrow, Coordinator and Assistant to the Executive Director
Ph. (617) 496-9157
E-mail: danielle_boudrow@harvard.edu

Naisha Bradley, Program Manager
Ph. (617) 496-6609
E-mail: naisha_bradley@harvard.edu

Nicole Carter, Associate Director for Finance & Administration
Ph. (617) 495-1354
E-mail: nicole_carter@harvard.edu

Kerry Conley, Communications Manager
Ph. (617) 495-8330
E-mail: kerry_conley@harvard.edu

Megan Farwell, Research Manager
Ph. (617) 496-4786
E-mail: megan_farwell@hks.harvard.edu

Heather McKinnon Glennon, Financial and Administrative Coordinator
Ph. (617) 384-7575
E-mail: heather_mckinnon@harvard.edu

Alicia Hammond, Associate
Ph. (617) 495-8756
E-mail: alicia_hammond@hks.harvard.edu
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Economic Opporunity

Our goals are to inform decision makers across all sectors on what policies, organizational practices and leadership techniques help close gender gaps and to train today’s and tomorrow’s leaders on how to create a more gender equal world, and to empower women to navigate systems effectively.
 
 
The Gender and Political Opportunity area integrates the study of gender and politics to understand gender dynamics in political action, discourse and within governmental structures. This area examines research of representation and participation within political structures to discover which practices yield the most effective results regarding gender equity. The goal is to share these strategies that enable women to participate and succeed in politics.

 
 
 
Closing the Global Gender Gap: A Call to Action is an initiative led by the Women and Public Policy Program in collaboration with the Center for International Development at the Harvard Kennedy School that aims to leverage Harvard University’s capacity for rigorous research and convening power toward creating gender equality.
 
The purpose of this initiative is threefold: to examine and quantify the impact of specific policy interventions, to develop a theory of change, and to stimulate innovative ideas and policy action in order to close the global gender gaps across four areas. These areas include economic participation and opportunity, educational attainment, health and survival, and political empowerment. There is enormous rhetoric about women’s empowerment—this initiative’s goal is to shed new light on the channels that successfully effect change.

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Reports & Resources

 

Ina Ganguli, Ricardo Hausmann and Martina Viarengo. International Labour Review (8 APR 2013)
Anti-statism and difference feminism in international social movements
Mansbridge, J. (2003). Anti-statism and Difference Feminism in International Social Movements. International Feminist Journal of Politics, 5, 3, 355-360.

Are outside offers an answer to the compensation negotiation dilemma for women?

Bowles, H.R. & Babcock, L. (2009). Are outside offers an answer to the compensation negotiation dilemma for women? Academy of Management Annual Meeting Proceedings.

Claiming fatherhood: Race and the dynamics of paternal involvement among unmarried men

Edin, K., Tach, L., & Mincy, R. (2009). Claiming Fatherhood: Race and the Dynamics of Paternal Involvement among Unmarried Men. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 621, 1, 149-177.

The cultural politics of everyday discourse: The case of “male chauvinist” 

Mansbridge, J., & Flaster, K. (2007). The Cultural Politics of Everyday Discourse: The Case of "Male Chauvinist". Critical Sociology, 33, 4, 627-660.

Do traditional institutions constrain female entrepreneurship? A field experiment on business training in India

Field, E., Jayachandran, S., & Pande, R. (2010). Do traditional institutions constrain female entrepreneurship? A field experiment on business training in India.American Economic Review, 100, 2, 125-129.

Exploring gendered behavior in the field with experiments: Why public goods are provided by women in a Nairobi slum

Greig, F., & Bohnet, I. (2009). Exploring gendered behavior in the field with experiments: Why public goods are provided by women in a Nairobi slum. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 70, 1-9.

Female leadership raises aspirations and educational attainment for girls: A policy experiment in India

Beaman, L., Duflo, E., Pande, R., & Topalova, P. (2012). Female leadership raises aspirations and educational attainment for girls: A policy experiment in India.Science, 335, 6068, 582-586.

Gender and persistence in negotiation: A dyadic perspective. 

Bowles, H. R., & Flynn, F. (2010). Gender and Persistence in Negotiation: A Dyadic Perspective. Academy of Management Journal, 53, 4, 769-787.

Gender differences in research grant applications and funding outcomes for medical school faculty

Waisbren, S. E., Bowles, H., Hasan, T., Zou, K. H., Emans, S. J., Goldberg, C., Gould, S., Levin, D., Lieberman, E., Loeken, M., Longtine, J., Nadelson, C., Patenaude, A.F., Quinn, D., Randolph, A.G., Solet, J.M., Ullrich, N., Walensky, R., Weitzman, P., Christou, H. (2008). Gender Differences in Research Grant Applications and Funding Outcomes for Medical School Faculty. Journal of Women's Health, 17, 2, 207-214.

Gender in job negotiations: A two-level game

Bowles, H. R., & McGinn, K. L. (2008). Gender in Job Negotiations: A Two-Level Game. Negotiation Journal, 24, 4, 393-410.

Introduction: Special section: Gender in negotiation

Bohnet, I., & Bowles, H. R. (2008). Introduction: Special section: Gender in negotiation. Negotiation Journal, 24, 4, 389-392.

Is there reciprocity in a reciprocal-exchange economy? Evidence of gendered norms from a slum in Nairobi, Kenya

Greig, F. & Bohnet, I. (2008). Is there reciprocity in a reciprocal-exchange economy? Evidence of gendered norms from a slum in Nairobi, Kenya. Economic Inquiry, 46, 1, 77-83.

“Male chauvinist,” “feminist,” “sexist,” and “sexual harassment”: Different trajectories in feminist linguistic innovation
 
Mansbridge, J., & Flaster, K. (2005). Male chauvinist, feminist, sexist, and sexual harassment: Different trajectories in feminist linguistic innovation. American Speech, 80, 3.

Moving teenagers out of high-risk neighborhoods: How girls fare better than boys

Clampet-Lundquist, S., Edin, K., Kling, J. R., & Duncan, G. J. (2011). Moving teenagers out of high-risk neighborhoods: How girls fare better than boys. American Journal of Sociology, 116, 4, 1154-1189.

Quota problems: Combating the dangers of essentialism 

Mansbridge, J. (2005). Quota Problems: Combating the Dangers of Essentialism. Politics & Gender, 1, 4, 622-638.

Parenting as a “package deal”: Relationships, fertility, and nonresident father involvement among unmarried parents

Tach, L., Mincy, R. B., & Edin, K. (2010). Parenting as a "Package Deal": Relationships, Fertility, and Nonresident Father Involvement Among Unmarried Parents.Demography, 47, 1, 181-204.

Poverty and the American family: A decade in review

Edin, K., & Kissane, R. J. (2010). Poverty and the american family: A decade in review. Journal of Marriage and Family, 72, 3, 460-479.

Powerful women: Does exposure reduce bias?

Beaman, L., Chattopadhyay, R., Duflo, E., Pande, R., & Topalova, P. (2009). Powerful women: Does exposure reduce bias? Quarterly Journal of Economics,124, 4, 1497-1540.

The relationships contexts of young disadvantaged men

Tach, L., & Edin, K. (2011). The Relationship Contexts of Young Disadvantaged Men. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 635, 1, 76-94.

Sex differences in research grant applications and funding outcomes for medical school faculty. 

Waisbren, S. E., Bowles, H., Hasan, T., Zou, K. H., Emans, S. J., Goldberg, C., Gould, S., Christou, H. (2008).
Gender differences in research grant applications and funding outcomes for medical school faculty. Journal of Women's Health (2002), 17,2, 207-14.

Should blacks represent blacks and women represent women? A contingent “yes”

Mansbridge, J. (1999). Should Blacks Represent Blacks and Women Represent Women? A Contingent "Yes". Journal of Politics, 61, 3, 628-657.

Social incentives for gender differences in the propensity to initiate negotiation: Sometimes it does hurt to ask. 

Bowles, H. R., Babcock, L., & Lai, L. (2007). Social incentives for gender differences in the propensity to initiate negotiations: Sometimes it does hurt to ask.Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 103, 1, 84-103.

Status and distrust: The relevance of inequality and betrayal aversion

Hong, K., & Bohnet, I. (2007). Status and distrust: The relevance of inequality and betrayal aversion. Journal of Economic Psychology, 28, 2.)

Toward a theory of backlash: Dynamic resistance and the central role of power

Mansbridge, J., & Shames, S. L. (2008). Toward a Theory of Backlash: Dynamic Resistance and the Central Role of Power. Politics and Gender, 4, 4, 623-633.

Trust and the reference points for trustworthiness in gulf and western countries

Bohnet, I., Zeckhauser, R., & Herrmann, B. (2010). Trust and the reference points for trustworthiness in gulf and western countries. Quarterly Journal of Economics,125, 2, 811-828.
 
 
Cohen, Dara Kay, Amelia Hoover Green, and Elisabeth Jean Wood, February 2013. United States Insistute of Peace.
 
The closing of the gender gap in education: Does it foretell the closing of the employment, marriage, and motherhood gaps?

Ganguli, I. Hausmann, R., & Viarengo, M. (2011). The closing of the gender gap in education: Does it foretell the closing of the employment, marriage, and motherhood gaps? (Working paper). 

The elasticity of trust: How to promote trust in the Arab Middle East and the United States

Bohnet, I., Herrmann, B., Al-Ississ, M., Robbett, A., Al-Yahia, K.,& Zeckhauser, R. (2010). The elasticity of trust: How to promote trust in the Arab Middle East (Working paper).
 

Desai, S.D., Chugh, D., & Brief, A. (2012). Marriage structure and resistance to the gender revolution in the workplace (Working paper). 

Performance and information: The role of organizational demography

Bohnet, I. & Saidi, F. (2011). Performance and information: The role of organizational demography (Working paper).

When performance trumps gender bias: Joint versus separate evaluation

Bohnet, I., van Geen, A., Bazerman, M. H. Norris, P. (2012). When performance trumps bias: Joint versus separate evaluation (Working paper).
 

Norris, P. (2012). Gender equality in elected office in Asia Pacific: Six actions to expand women’s empowerment.

Militarizing men: Gender, conscription, and war in post-Soviet Russia

Eichler, M. (2012). Militarizing men: Gender, conscription, and war in post-Soviet Russia. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press.

Promises I can keep: Why poor women put motherhood before marriage.

Edin, K., & Kefalas, M. (2005). Promises I can keep: Why poor women put motherhood before marriage. Berkeley: University of California Press.

When Johnny and Jane come marching home: How all of us can help veterans

Caplan, P. J. (2011). When Johnny and Jane come marching home: How all of us can help veterans. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

Why we lost the ERA 

Mansbridge, J. J. (1986). Why we lost the ERA. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 
 

Edin, K. & Tach, L. (2012). Becoming a parent: Social contexts of fertility during young adulthood. In A. Booth (Ed.), Early adulthood in the family context (185-220). New York: Springer.

Daddy, baby, momma, maybe: Low-income urban fathers and the “package deal” of family life

Edin, K., Nelson, T., & Reed, J.M. (2011). In M.J. Carlson & P. England (Eds.), Social class and changing families in an unequal America (85-107). Palo Alto: Stanford University Press.

Feminism

Mansbridge, J. & Okin, S.M. (2007). Feminism. In R. Goodin, P. Pettit, & T. Pogge (Eds.), A companion to contemporary political philosophy, 2nd edition (332-359). Oxford: Blackwell.

Making a way out of no way: How mothers meet basic family needs while moving from welfare to work.

Clampet-Lundquist, S., Edin, K., London, A., Scott, E., & Hunter, V. (2004). Making a way out of no way: How mothers meet basic family needs while moving from welfare to work. In A.C. Crouter & A. Booth (Eds.), Work-family challenges for low-income parents and their children (203-242). Malwah: Lawrence Earlbaum Associates.

Political reservation and substantive representation: Evidence form Indian Village Councils

Beaman, L., Duflo, E., Pande, R., & Topalova, P. (2011). Political reservation and substantive representation: Evidence form Indian Village Councils. In S. Bery, B. Bosworth & A. Panagariya (Eds.), India Policy Forum 2010-2011. Brookings Institution Press and the National Council of Applied Economic Research: Washington, D.C. and New Delhi.

Politics as a male domain and empowerment in India

Beaman, L., Pande, R., & Cirone, A. (2011). Politics as a male domain and empowerment in India. In S. Francheschet, M.L. Krook, & J.M. Piscopo (Eds.), The impact of gender quotas. New York: Springer

Untapped potential in the study of negotiation and gender inequality in organizations

Bowles, H. R., & McGinn, K. L. (August 01, 2008). Chapter 2: Untapped Potential in the Study of Negotiation and Gender Inequality in Organizations. Academy of Management Annals, 2, 1.)

Whatever happened to the ERA?

Mansbridge, J. (2003). Whatever happened to the ERA? In S. Schwarzenbach & P. Smith (Eds.), Women and the United States constitution: History, interpretation, and practice (365-378). New York: Columbia University Press.

Wombfare: The religious basis of fertility politics

Toft, M. (2011). Wombfare: The religious basis of fertility politics. In J.A. Goldstone, E. Kauffman, & M.D. Toft (Eds.), Political demography: Identity, institutions, and conflict. Boulder, CO: Paradigm Publishers.

Writing as a Democrat and a Feminist 

Mansbridge, J. (2003). Writing as a Democrat and a feminist. In B. Glassner & R. Hertz (Eds.), Our studies, ourselves: Sociologists’ lives and work (127-138). New York: Oxford University Press.
 
 
By Rohini Pande and Deanna Ford. Background Paper for the World Development Report 2012.
 
 
 
Financial Times, November 26, 2011.
 
 
By Iris Bohnet. Financial Times, October 13, 2010.

"Microcredit is not the Enemy." 
 
By Rohini Pande et al. Financial Times, December 12, 2010.

“Can Political Affirmative Action for Women Reduce Gender Bias?” 
 
By Rohini Pande et al. Vox, January 8, 2009.

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Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Summer Fellowship Program

The Women and Public Policy Program provides stipends for summer internships that focus on closing gender gaps across the globe. Over the past decade the Women and Public Policy Program has enabled Harvard graduate students to complement their academic work with field experience in the US and internationally. WAPPP offers up to $6,500 for students to work in the field for a minimum of eight weeks on gender-focused projects and research.
 
 
From Harvard Square to the Oval Office: A Political Campaign Practicum (Oval Office) is a non-partisan initiative of the Women and Public Policy Program that provides a select group of Harvard graduate students with the training and support they need to ascend in the electoral process at the local, state and national levels. Our students form a robust network of women in government who support each other as they advance their careers. We believe that providing these tools and building a supportive network within the ranks of professional politics are necessary steps in correcting the large scale gender imbalance in the United States' government.

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