Women's, Gender & Feminist Studies

In 1970, the field of women’s, gender and feminist studies was launched and was able to thrive in the ensuing years. NCRW was established in 1982 to create a supportive network for the burgeoning women’s research movement. Today, there are more than 900 women’s studies programs in the US with more than 10,000 courses offered on college campuses. Much of the curriculum is interdisciplinary and, in many instances, mainstreamed across subject areas. From the social sciences to liberal arts, fine arts and the sciences, feminist theory and framing (especially the intersection of race, gender and class) is having an important impact across disciplines in academia and beyond.

Campus Action Project 2008-2009: Where the Girls Are: Promoting Equity for All

"Women and Girls" is a comprehensive look at girls' and women's educational progress over the past 35 years, from elementary school to college and beyond. Despite overall gains, the report highlights specific groups of women and girls for whom progress has been slower. The objective of this year's CAP program is to provide a platform for campus programming that is informed by this research.

Report: “Women, Work and the Academy: Strategies for Responding to ‘Post-Civil Rights Era’ Discrimination.”

Report: "Women, Work and the Academy: Strategies for Responding to ‘Post-Civil Rights Era' Discrimination." This report is based on the Virginia C. Gildersleeve Conference, organized so as to take stock of the extant research and interventions and to chart a course forward. The report highlights the effects of a diffuse set of barriers to women's participation.

URL: 
http://www.barnard.edu/bcrw/newfeministsolutions/reports/NFS2-Women_Work_and_the_Academy.pdf

Expert Profile

Location: 
United States
33° 44' 56.382" N, 84° 23' 16.7352" W

Beverly Guy Sheftall, Ph.D., is the founding director of the Women's Research and Resource Center and the Anna Julia Cooper Professor of Women's Studies at Spelman College.  She is also adjunct professor at Emory University's Institute for Women's Studies where she teaches graduate courses. At the age of sixteen, she entered Spelman College where she majored in English and minored in secondary education.  After graduation with honors, she attended Wellesley College for a fifth year of study in English.  In 1968, she entered Atlanta to pursue a master's degree in English; her thesis was entitled, "Faulkner's Treatment of Women in His Major Novels."  A year later she began her first teaching job in the Department of English at Alabama State University in Montgomery, Alabama.

Location

Atlanta, GA
United States
33° 44' 56.382" N, 84° 23' 16.7352" W

WOMEN’S EQUALITY FORUM: Daddy, can a man be Prime Minister?

By Gwendolyn Beetham*

When I was in graduate school in London, one of my professors told a cute story about his daughter, born during the Thatcher era, who as a small child had asked him whether a man could be Prime Minister. The point that my professor was trying to make was that having more women in positions of power does make a difference in how women’s roles are perceived by society at large.


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WOMEN’S EQUALITY FORUM: Achieving Political Equality by Living It

By Tonni Brodber*

Linda Basch: From your perspective, what is the unfinished work of women’s political equality?

Tonni Brodber: In the English-speaking Caribbean women’s participation in political leadership ranges from a high of 13% in Jamaica to a low of 0% in Belize, with many countries like St. Kitts and Nevis and St Lucia hovering at 6.7% and at 5.6% respectively. In the face of such paltry numbers, it almost pains me to say that it is my belief that the unfuinished work of women’s political equality is the lack of quality and diversity.


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