Title IX

Title IX has significantly improved women and girls’ access to educational opportunities as well as protection from discrimination and sexual harassment. The law protects students, faculty and staff in all institutions of learning from kindergarten through post-secondary. It also prohibits discriminatory practices based on pregnancy, childbirth, miscarriage or sexual orientation. Title IX has been instrumental in advancing women’s athletics and, since its enactment, steadily increased the number of girls and women participating in school sports. Title IX addresses the availability, quality and kinds of benefits, opportunities and treatment that athletes receive. How Title IX applies to other educational areas, in particular science and technology, is a source of increasing interest and debate.

Ticket Office Sexism: The Gender Gap in Pricing for NCAA Division I Basketball

Member Organization: 
Date/Time: 
03/04/2010
Lunchtime Presentation
  
Laura Pappano and Allison J. Tracy, Ph.D.

 Location: Cheever House 

 For more details>>

 

AAUW's Lisa Maatz Responds to State of the Union Address

Lisa Maatz, AAUW's director of public policy and government relations, responds to President Obama's State of the Union address.  

Video URL: 
Untitled
See video

FAST FACT: GENDER EQUITY IN ATHLETICS DURING DIFFICULT ECONOMIC TIMES

November 16, 2009 posted by Kyla Bender-Baird

As the economy dips, schools are tightening their belts. Unfortunately—but not surprisingly—a new fact sheet released by the National Women’s Law Center reveals that girls are bearing the brunt of budget cuts. According to the fact sheet,


<< Back to the Full Blog

Kelly Kulick becomes first woman to win PBA Tour title

Kulick became the first woman to win a PBA Tour title on Sunday, beating Chris Barnes in the final of the 45th Tournament of Champions.

URL: 
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/bowling/2010-01-24-kelly-kulick-tour-of-champions_N.htm

Women's Sports Foundation

The Women’s Sports Foundation—the leading authority on the participation of women and girls in sports—advocates for equality, educates the public, conducts research and offers grants to promote sports and physical activity for girls and women.

Founded by Billie Jean King in 1974, the Women’s Sports Foundation builds on her legacy as a champion athlete, advocate of social justice and agent of change. We strive for gender equity and fight discrimination in sports.

Our work shapes public attitude about women’s sports and athletes, builds capacities for organizations that get girls active, provides equal opportunities for girls and women, and supports physically and emotionally healthy lifestyles.

The Women’s Sports Foundation is recognized worldwide for its leadership, vision, strength, expertise and influence.

Contact

1899 Hempstead Turnpike
East Meadow, NY 11554
Ph. (516) 542-4700, 1(800) 227-3988
Fx. (516) 542-4716
http://www.womenssportsfoundation.org
Info@WomensSportsFoundation.org


Back

Principal Staff

Kathryn Olson, Chief Executive Officer

Stacy L. Holand, Athlete Marketing Manager
E-mail: sholand@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Yolanda L. Jackson, Senior Director of Athlete Marketing and Promotions
E-mail: YJackson@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Karen Kranitz, Executive Assistant to the CEO and Board of Trustees
E-mail: KKranitz@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Shari M. Levitz, Annual Giving and Membership Manager
E-mail: SLevitz@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Gwendolyn Singleton, Data Entry Clerk
E-mail: GSingleton@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Chris Voelz, Leadership Gifts Officer
E-mail: CVoelz@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Stephen Collins, Information Technology Manager
E-mail: SCollins@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Barry M. Giaquinto, Chief Financial and Operations Officer
E-mail: BGiaquinto@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Felice Harris, Accounting Manager
E-mail: FHarris@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Lindsay Hock, Web Editor
E-mail: LHock@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Aleia Naylor, Senior Marketing Officer
E-mail: ANaylor@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Liz Ruttenberg, SHENetwork Project Manager
E-mail: lruttenberg@womenssportsfoundation.org

Sarah Axelson, Program Associate
Ph. (516) 542-4700 x148
E-mail: SAxelson@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Jessica M. Blubaugh, Senior Events Manager
E-mail: JBlubaugh@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Stacey Careri, Foundation and Government Funding Manager
E-mail: SCareri@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Candice Dixon, GoGirlGo! Atlanta Program Coordinator
E-mail: CDixon@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Jennifer L. Eddy, Senior Director of Programs and Events
E-mail: JEddy@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Elizabeth L. Flores, Program Officer
E-mail: LFlores@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Cicley Gay, GoGirlGo! Senior Program Officer
E-mail: CGay@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Kerry Milhaven, Events Coordinator
E-mail: KMilhaven@WomensSportsFoundation.org

Whitney Post, GoGirlGo! Boston Director
E-mail: WPost@WomensSportsFoundation.org
Back

Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

GoGirlGo!

GoGirlGo!, our award winning curriculum and sports education program, works to improve the health of sedentary girls and keeps girls involved in physical activity by supporting programs and organizations that work with girls.

 


Back

Reports & Resources

Click here for all publications.


Back

Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

GoGirlGo! Grants

Our GoGirlGo! grants award organizations who seek to enhance the lives of girls using sports, physical activity and life lessons taught through our GoGirlGo! curriculum.

Travel and Training Fund

Since 1984, we have awarded grants to more than 1300 individual athletes and teams – including figure skaters Michelle Kwan and Rachael Flatt, diver Mary Ellen Clark, ski jumper Alissa Johnson, swimmer Mallory Weggemann and the US National Water Polo Team.

 


Back

Publication: WREI has just released the new sixth edition (2008) of Women in the Military: Where They Stand

Publication: WREI has just released the new sixth edition (2008) of Women in the Military: Where They Stand," which includes information on active duty, reserve and Guard forces and on women veterans as well as updated statistics and a chronology of important policy and legislative milestones. WREI has worked in various coalitions to promote and protect Title IX. The center director has spoken at various women's studies departments in universities across the country and to women's groups during the summer Olympics on the 35th anniversary of Title IX.

URL: 
http://www.wrei.org/

The National Women’s Law Center (NWLC)

URL: 
http://www.nwlc.org

Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Founded in 1974, the Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University creates knowledge and seeks to implement change to promote gender equality. Our current focus is Moving Beyond the Stalled Gender Revolution. We are bringing together an intellectually diverse group of scholars to provide new insights into the barriers to women's advancement and to propose novel and workable solutions to advancing gender equality.

Contact

589 Capistrano Way
Stanford, CA 94305-8640
Ph. (650) 723-1994
Fx. (650) 725-0374
http://gender.stanford.edu/
gender-email@stanford.edu


Back

Principal Staff

Lori Nishiura Mackenzie, Executive Director
PH. (650) 723-1994
Email: lorim@stanford.edu

Shelley J. Correll, Director, Clayman Institute
Ph. (650) 723-1994
E-mail: scorrell@stanford.edu

Ann Enthoven, Program Manager
E-mail: ann.enthoven@stanford.edu

Andrea Rees Davies, Director of Programs and Research
E-mail: ardavies@stanford.edu

Wendy Skidmore, Program Associate

Marion Groh Marquardt, Web Specialist
Email: marionm@stanford.edu
Back

Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

Ms. at 40 and the Future of Feminism

Celebrate the 40th anniversary of Ms. magazine in January 2012 at Stanford University. A keynote speech by Ms. founding editor, Gloria Steinem, will be the centerpiece of a Winter Quarter series of events that looks back on what Ms. has meant to its readers over the last 40 years and that looks ahead to what feminism may mean for the next generation.  
 
 
According to national studies, women hold more than half of all professional occupations in the U.S. but fewer than 24 percent of all computing-related occupations, representing a huge pool of untapped talent. The numbers are not moving in favor of increasing women's participation in technology; in 2008 women earned only 18 percent of all computer science degrees. Back in 1985, women earned 37 percent of CS degrees, nearly double today's share.

The Clayman Institute for Gender Research conducted two studies looking at the participation of women in technology and offering new ideas and solutions for increasing the role women play in the development and use of technology.
 
 
The lectures will take place in Winter Quarter at Stanford University. Lecturers will be selected competitively. Nominations by must include a description of the contribution of the nominee to advancing gender equality. Special emphasis will be placed on inviting women of color, women who reach across traditional disciplinary boundaries, and women who play a public role in advancing gender equality. Nominations are accepted on a rolling basis as lecture slots are still available. Nominators are encouraged to contact the Clayman Institute [email] to discuss potential nominees and nomination requirements prior to submitting a nomination.
 
The Clayman Institute will provide publicity and will cover the costs of travel, a small honorarium, and networking events and meals.
 
 
"Art at the Institute" exhibits artists, female and male, whose work critically engages with contemporary discourses around gender. Work seen at Serra House ranges from paintings to photography, computer manipulated images, weaving, prints, and mixed media, and illustrates artists' rich use of imagery, form, political perspectives, and grrrl attitude. The program will highlight the ways contemporary art takes part in the ongoing dialogues surrounding gender. 
 
 
The Clayman Institute supports efforts that translate our research and programs into actions for change. We have posted videos, discussion guides, and other ways to keep the conversation going. Sometimes, research is the first stop on the way to change.

Back

Reports & Resources

 
Meeting the needs and expectations of dual-career academic couples - while still ensuring the high quality of university faculty - is one of the great challenges facing universities. Academic couples (those with both partners working in an academic environment) represent a deep pool of talent. Yet, dual-career academic hiring often remains difficult and controversial. The Clayman Institute's 2008 study, Dual-Career Academic Couples: What Universities Need to Know, surveyed 30,000 faculty at 13 of the nation's leading public and private research universities. The report reviews practices, policies and programs for administrators to successfully work with the hiring and retaining of dual-career academic couples. Our pages contain resources for academic institutions and dual-career couples alike.

Aging

Yalom, Marilyn & Carstensen, Laura (eds). Inside the American Couple. ( Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2002>

Difficult Dialogues Program - Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Aging in the 21st Century consensus report. ( Stanford, CA: Stanford University, 2002)

Economic and social status of women

Clayman Institute. 2008. Climbing The Tech Ladder; Obstacles and Solutions for Mid-Level Women in Information Technology. Written by A. Henderson, C. Simard, S. Gilmartin, L. Schiebinger, and T. Whitney.

Strober, Myra and Agnes Miling Keneko Chan. The Road Winds Uphill All the Way: Gender, Work, and Family in the United States and Japan. (Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1999)

Family

Clayman Institute. 2008. Dual-Career Academic Couples: What Universities Need To Know. Written by L. Schiebinger, A. Henderson, and S. Gilmartin.

Yalom, Marilyn. A History of the Wife. ( New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers Inc., 2001)

Yalom, Marilyn and Thorne, Barrie (eds). Rethinking the Family. (Albany, NY: State University New York Press, 1990)

Feminist Thought and Scholarship

Rhode, Deborah L. Speaking of Sex: The Denial of Gender Inequality. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1997)

Rhode, Deborah L. Theoretical Perspectives on Sexual Difference. (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1990)

Boxer, Marilyn Jacoby. When Women Ask the Questions: Creating Women's Studies in America. (Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998)

Freedman, Estelle. No Turning Back. ( Westminster, MD: Ballantine Books, 2002)

Global Issues

Walker-Moffat, Wendy. The Other Side of the Asian American Success Story. (San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1995)

Mahadevi Varma. Translated by Neera Kuckerja Sohoni. Sketches from My Past: Encounters with India's Oppressed. (Boston, MA: Northeastern University Press, 1997)

Mankekar, Purnima. Screening Culture, Viewing Politics: Television, Womanhood and Nation in Modern India. ( Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2000)

Zheng, Wang. Women in the Chinese Enlightenment: Oral and Textual Histories. (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, Berkeley, 1999)

Health and Health Care

Litt, Iris. Taking Our Pulse: The Health of America's Women. (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1997)

History

Freedman, Estelle. Maternal Justice: Miriam Van Waters and the Female Reform Tradition. (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1996)

Gelles, Edith. First Thoughts: Life and Letters of Abigail Adams. (New York, NY: Twayne Publishers, 1998)

Gelles, Edith. Portia: The World of Abigail Adams. (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1992)

McCurry, Stephanie. Masters of Small Worlds: Yeoman Households, Gender Relations and the Political Culture of Antebellum South Carolina Low Country. (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1995)

Offen, Karen. European Feminisms, 1700-1950: A Political History. ( Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2000)

Schiebinger, Londa. Plants and Empire: Colonial Bioprospecting in the Atlantic World ( Harvard University Press, 2004)
Yalom, Marilyn. A History of the Breast. (New York, NY: Knopf, 1997)

Science

Schiebinger, L., (ed.). 2008. Gendered Innovations in Science and Engineering. Stanford University Press, 2008 was published on March 12, 2008.  

Schiebinger, Londa. Nature's Body: Gender in the Making of Modern Science (Beacon Press, 1993; Rutgers University Press, 2004)

Schiebinger, Londa. Has Feminism Changed Science? (Harvard University Press, 1999)

Schiebinger, Londa. The Mind Has No Sex? Women in the Origins of Modern Science (Harvard University Press, 1989)

Sexuality

Lewin, Ellen. Inventing Lesbian Cultures in America. (Boston, MA: Beacon Press, 1996)

Mintz, Beth & Rothblum, Esther (eds). Lesbians in Academia: Degrees of Freedom. (New York, NY: Routledge, 1997)


Back

Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

Postdoctoral Research Fellowships

The Clayman Institute offers a two-year postdoctoral fellowship that focus on the Institute's theme, "Beyond the Stalled Revolution: Reinvigorating Gender Equality in the Twenty-first Century." Recent Ph.D.'s in all disciplines of the humanities and social sciences whose research focuses on gender are eligible. We encourage scholars with a strong interest in interdisciplinary methods to apply. While in residence at the Institute, Postdoctoral Scholars are expected to participate in Clayman Institute activities throughout the academic year in addition to pursuing their own research.

Graduate Dissertation Fellowships

The Clayman Institute’s Graduate Dissertation Fellowships (GDF) are awarded to outstanding Stanford doctoral students who are engaged in research on women and/or gender. The fellowships will provide financial support for top gender scholars as they complete their dissertations, while encouraging interdisciplinary connections for their research. Clayman GDFs will have offices at the Clayman Institute, where they will participate in the intellectual life of the Clayman Institute as well as take part in professional development workshops during the academic year.  GDFs will be contributing to the writing and research efforts of the Clayman Institute. Fellowship funding is for three quarters: two quarters of research assistantship and one quarter teaching assistantship. In addition to the stipend, GDFs will receive $1,000 in research funding.

Marilyn Yalom Research Fund

The Marilyn Yalom Research Fund supports currently enrolled Stanford Ph.D. candidates working in the humanities on issues concerning women and gender in the humanities.  The research funds support original research or conference costs. Dr. Yalom has been part of the Clayman Institute since 1978, having served as both Associate Director and Acting Director. She is currently a Senior Scholar, and is well known as an internationally acclaimed historian of women's and gender issues.

Majorie Lozoff Graduate Prize

The Marjorie Lozoff Prize is awarded annually by the Marjorie Lozoff Fund for Research on Women and Gender to promote scholarship in areas that further women's development. All currently registered Stanford University graduate students, in any academic or professional discipline, are eligible. The range of research topics include, but are not limited to: men and women's role within the family; the role of women and gender in science, medicine, and engineering; women's participation in the professions and other areas of work; women as entrepreneurs; women and gender in developing societies; women and gender cross-culturally. Preference will be given to original research on current social issues.

Myra Strober Prize

The Myra Strober Prize honors the best Gender News article written by a Stanford graduate or undergraduate student.  The $1,500 annual prize highlights news articles about women’s education, work, family, or the nexus of work and family.


Back

Women's Resource Center

The Women's Resource Center is an integral part of Washington State University's commitment to equity and diversity. The Center works to promote a safe and supportive climate that enables women to engage as full and active participants within the university community. The Women's Resource Center helps transform the educational environment into a more inclusive and progressive institution by assisting, supporting, and mentoring women at Washington State University.

The Women's Resource Center develops programs to celebrate women's diversity and contributions, while actively confronting societal challenges and obstacles through activism and working for change. Our programs address gender, race, class, and their intersections, recognizing the relevance of these inter-related social issues. Offering resources and educational programs to members of our university, we engage the larger constituencies to act as change agents for a more diverse and inclusive educational system.

Contact


Pullman, WA 99164-4005
Ph. (509) 335-6849
Fx. (509) 335-4377
http://www.women.wsu.edu/
kim_barrett@wsu.edu


Back

Principal Staff

Turea Erwin, Director & NEW Leadership Inland Northwest Coordinator
Ph. (509) 335-8200
E-mail: turea_erwin@wsu.edu

Kim Barrett, Program Support Specialist
Ph. (509) 335-4386
E-mail: kim_barrett@wsu.edu

Stephanie Russell, YWCA of WSU Program Coordinator
Ph. (509) 335-2572
E-mail: stephanie.russell@email.wsu.edu

Joseph Pacific, Program Coordinator-Women's Transit and Campus Walking Services
Ph. (509) 335-1856
E-mail: jpacific@wsu.edu
Back

Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

 
A core pillar of the Women's Resource Center, Women's Transit strives to extend the values of inspiration, encouragement, and empowerment to all students at Washignton State University. The primary goal of this program is to act as a resource to reduce the incidents of sexual assault in the community. Students who feel safe getting to and from classes, work, and social events are far more likely to succeed than students who are scared to simply live their lives while at school. We also believe that giving back to the community is incredibly important to a well-rounded education. We give nearly all students who apply the opportunity to learn valuable skills in communication, crisis management, and sexual assault risk reduction.
 
 
The Coalition for Women Students (CWS) was formed in 1912 as the Association for Women Students (AWS) by the Washington State College women students. The term “coalition” was adopted in the fall of 1993 to express a common vision for the student groups involved. A coalition is comprised of distinct groups or persons in alliance for joint action. In this case the joint action is heightening awareness of issues pertaining to women locally and globally.
 
 
APAW is committed to coordinating student programs that heighten awareness of Pacific and Asian women’s issues. APAW’s programs empower community and individual pride, celebrate our rich cultures, and highlight our diverse contributions. The Association of Pacific and Asian Women fosters leadership development opportunities for women by bringing ideas and vision into action on an individual and group level. Women’s leadership roles are supported and fostered within our organization.
 
 
The Black Women's Caucus (BWC) serves as a support system for African American Women on the WSU campus. Its main focus is to serve as an instrument through which African American women are able to express their concerns about issues they face globally as well as locally. BWC is also concerned with educating other students about the pioneering roles and major contributions of African American women in this society. Membership is open to all students who share the concerns of Black Women's Caucus.
 
 
Mujeres Unidas represents the interests and issues of Chicanas/Latinas at WSU and coordinates activities and opportunities of interest to multicultural women students. Members contribute to community projects and provide peer support for Chicanas and Latinas. In addition, MU provides women with the opportunity to gain leadership training and experience.
 
 
The purpose of the Native American Women's Association (NAWA) is to address the needs and concerns of Native American people, with a special emphasis on issues that affect Native American women. NAWA encourages women of color to assume leadership roles on campus and become actively involved in the community.
 
 
The YWCA of WSU is a member association of the YWCA of the USA. We have been part of the WSU community since 1895 and are proud to be part of this women's membership movement.

 


Back

Reports & Resources

Center News

Opportunities, Grants & Fellowships

 
Whether you are looking to give two hours or fourty hours of your time this semester, Women's Transit and Campus Walking Services wants to bring you on as part of the team. No prior experience in ANYTHING is necessary. We will train everyone is driving, dispatching, and walking. You don't even need a driver license (we obviously won't place you as a driver, but there are many other things that you can do)!

 


Back

Wellesley Centers for Women

At the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW), Wellesley College, we believe that disciplined, relevant research and theory paired with innovative training and action programs are key building blocks for social progress.
 
Since 1974, WCW has conducted interdisciplinary studies on issues such as: gender equity in education, sexual harassment in schools, child care, adolescent development, gender violence, and women’s leadership—studies that have influenced private practices and public policy.
 
WCW staff members provide professional development for educators, child caregivers, and youth workers that encourage children’s social-emotional development and enhance learning environments and safety.
 
Other WCW scholars have dedicated themselves to the prevention of psychological problems, the enhancement of psychological well-being, and the search for a more comprehensive understanding of human deve

Contact

106 Central Street
Wellesley, MA 02481-8203
Ph. 781-283-2500
Fx. 781-283-2504
http://www.wcwonline.org
newswcw@wellesley.edu


Back

Featured Events

Employment Opportunities

Projects & Campaigns

Child and Adolescent Development

Scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women have conducted research studies and evaluations on issues related to child and adolescent development, including issues around race, ethnicity, immigrant status, and identity; the effects of early child care; the value of physical activity; preventing depression; examining unique family dynamics; and exploring sexuality and evaluating sex-education programming.

Childcare

Scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women have studied the ability of public schools to prepare young children for lifelong learning and have shaped local, state, and federal policies. Our groundbreaking research, policy development, and training programs set the standards for out-of-school time, and continue to inform the field in new areas, including physical activity programming.

 
Scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW) have conducted research on a range of educational issues, including quality early education; equitable opportunities in STEM fields and literacy; and bullying prevention and sex-education programming. Scholars and trainers from WCW have also developed curricula and facilitated programs that promote equity and diversity and social-emotional learning in educational settings. Our research has raised public consciousness about serious education issues and has informed public policy.
 
 
Scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women have conducted numerous research studies on issues related to gender violence, including bullying- and sexual harassment-prevention programs in schools, and patterns of and interventions for intimate partner violence, including family violence and teen dating violence.
 
 
Work by scholars at the Wellesley Centers for Women led to Relational-Cultural Theory, an understanding that has dramatically changed counseling and psychotherapy practices. Through training institutes, this work continues to be developed and implemented. Researchers committed to the prevention of depression in at-risk youth have undertaken studies to identify effective intervention programming for adolescents and families. Trainers and educators at the Centers develop curricula and facilitate training to promote social-emotional learning in elementary schools.
 
 
Scholars are the Wellesley Centers for Women have conducted research on economic implications of public policy; undertaken studies and audits; facilitated network building; and produced valuable resources for advocates, policy makers, and legal professionals in the U.S. and abroad. This work covers a broad range of issues related to the social and economic development of women, children, and persons with disabilities.
 
 
Scholars at the Wellesley Centers undertake research initiatives that explore issues affecting work/life balance, including child care, work-leave policies, and gender roles. Research and action programs that address women’s leadership inform business practice and policy in the U.S. and within our global-network-partner communities. The Women’s Review of Books, a special publication of the Centers, puts women’s perspectives and voices at the center of literary contributions.

Back

Reports & Resources

For all publications, click here.


Back

Center News

Syndicate content